Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have a class that checks whether a string is a palindrome or not. I have two questions.

1) Is this the most efficient way to check for palindrome? 2) Can this be implemented recursively?

public class Words {

    public static boolean isPalindrome(String word) {
    String pal = null;
    word = word.replace(" ", "");
    pal = new StringBuffer(word).reverse().toString();
    if (word.compareTo(pal) == 0) {
        return true;
    } else {
        return false;
    }

    }

}

Have a test class to test this... Doubt its needed but here it is anyways if anyone cares to try it out to be able to help me with any of the two questions above...

public class testWords {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
    if (Words.isPalindrome("a") == true) {
        System.out.println("true");
    } else {
        System.out.println("false");
    }
    if (Words.isPalindrome("cat") == true) {
        System.out.println("true");
    } else {
        System.out.println("false");
    }
    if (Words.isPalindrome("w o    w") == true) {
        System.out.println("true");
    } else {
        System.out.println("false");
    }
    if (Words.isPalindrome("   a  ") == true) {
        System.out.println("true");
    } else {
        System.out.println("false");
    }
    if (Words.isPalindrome("mom!") == true) {
        System.out.println("true");
    } else {
        System.out.println("false");
    }

    }

}

thanks in advance for any help and or input :)

share|improve this question
    
You might want to change what you consider to be valid characters when deciding if a phrase is a palindrome. For example, "Madam, I'm Adam" is a palindrome. – Andrew Morton Mar 30 '13 at 19:36
    
so i should try to get my program to ignore characters such as " ' " – choloboy7 Mar 30 '13 at 19:38
    
2  
First, filter out all the non-alphanumeric characters, then check for it being a palindrome. – Andrew Morton Mar 30 '13 at 19:55
    
return (word.compareTo(pal) == 0) saves on the if. – Andrew Morton Mar 30 '13 at 20:02
up vote 5 down vote accepted

To implement a 'palindrome check' recursively, you must compare if the first and last characters are the same. If they are not the same the string is most certainly not a palindrome. If they are the same the string might be a palindrome, you need to compare the 2nd character with the 2nd to last character, and so on until you have strictly less then 2 characters remaining to be checked in your string.

A recursive algorithm would look like this:

public static boolean isPalindrome(String word) {
  //Strip out non-alphanumeric characters from string
  String cleanWord = word.replaceAll("[^a-zA-Z0-9]","");
  //Check for palindrome quality recursively
  return checkPalindrome(cleanWord);
}
private static boolean checkPalindrome(String word) {
  if(word.length() < 2) { return true;  }
  char first  = word.charAt(0);
  char last   = word.charAt(word.length()-1);
  if(  first != last  ) { return false; }
  else { return checkPalindrome(word.substring(1,word.length()-1)); }
}
  • Note, that my recursion method is not most efficient approach, but simple to understand

  • Marimuthu Madasamy has a more efficient recursive method, but is harder to understand

  • Joe F has listed an equivalently efficient iterative method
    which is the best approach for implementation because it cannot cause a stack overflow error
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 This seems correct, would you mind explaining to OP why this works? – Benjamin Gruenbaum Mar 30 '13 at 19:41
1  
I think you mean word.length() < 2 for your base case. – Ajay Mar 30 '13 at 19:44
1  
@Ajay you are correct, thanks for spotting the typo – recursion.ninja Mar 30 '13 at 19:45
1  
Darn I thought I fixed that, internalPalindromeCheck should have been the checkPalindrome method. – recursion.ninja Mar 31 '13 at 14:25
1  
@choloboy7 the word.replaceAll("[^a-zA-Z0-9]",""); is a statement telling java to take the string, find all non alphanumeric characters, and replace them with the empty string. The confusing part I assume is "[^a-zA-Z0-9]". This called a Regular Expression (RegEx), they are a powerful and versatile tool. Definitely worth learning in time. – recursion.ninja Mar 31 '13 at 14:28

Here is another recursive solution but using array which could give you some performance advantage over string in recursive calls (avoiding substring or charAt).

private static boolean isPalindrome(final char[] chars, final int from,
        final int to) {
    if (from > to) return true;
    return chars[from] != chars[to] ? false 
                                    : isPalindrome(chars, from + 1, to - 1);
}

public static boolean isPalindrome(final String s) {
    return isPalindrome(s.toCharArray(), 0, s.length() - 1);
}

The idea is that we keep track of two positions in the array, one at the beginning and another at the end and we keep moving the positions towards the center.

When the positions overlap and pass, we are done comparing all the characters and all the characters so far have matched; the string is palindrome.

At each pass, we compare the characters and if they don't match then the string is not palindrome otherwise move the positions closer.

share|improve this answer
    
Your solution is elegant, but I fear it is to obtuse for a beginner to understand intuitively. Perhaps add some comments? – recursion.ninja Mar 30 '13 at 20:19
    
sure, let me expand that a bit. – Marimuthu Madasamy Mar 30 '13 at 20:24
    
+1 for a great explanation and slick code! – recursion.ninja Mar 30 '13 at 20:34

It's actually sufficient to only check up to the middle character to confirm that it is a palindrome, which means you can simplify it down to something like this:

// Length of my string.
int length = myString.length();

// Loop over first half of string and match with opposite character.
for (int i = 0; i <= length / 2; i++) {
    // If we find one that doesn't match then return false.
    if (myString.charAt(i) != myString.charAt(length - 1 - i)) return false;
}

// They all match, so we have found a palindrome!
return true;

A recursive solution is very possible but it is not going to give you any performance benefit (and probably isn't as readable).

share|improve this answer
    
I dont understand. Would one not need to check the second half of the word??? How can checking up to middle character guarantee it is a palindrome? – choloboy7 Mar 30 '13 at 20:00
2  
@choloboy7 Because you already checked the second half; When you check the first character you compare it to the last, when you compare the 2nd character you compare it to the 2nd to last. When you reach the middle all characters have been compared. – recursion.ninja Mar 30 '13 at 20:02
    
@awashburn of course :) makes full sense now, thanks! – choloboy7 Mar 30 '13 at 20:06

Can this be implemented Recursively?

YES
Here is example:

public static boolean palindrome(String str)
{
    if (str.length()==1 || str.length == 0)
    return true;
    char c1 = str.charAt(0);
    char c2 = str.charAt(str.length() - 1);
    if (str.length() == 2)
    {
        if (c1 == c2)
        return true;
        else
        return false;
    }
    if (c1 == c2)
    return palindrome(str.substring(1,str.length() - 1));
    else
    return false;
}
share|improve this answer
    
@awashburn: can you tell me those words apart from 0 length word where it fails? – Vishal K Mar 30 '13 at 20:19
    
so it means except for 0 length word, it is working fine for all other words..right? – Vishal K Mar 30 '13 at 20:22

My two cents. It's always nice to see the different ways people solve a problem. Of course this is not the most efficient algorithm memory or speed wise.

public static boolean isPalindrome(String s) {

    if (s.length() <= 1) { // got to the middle, no need for more checks
        return true;
    }

    char l = s.charAt(0); // first char
    char r = s.charAt(s.length() - 1); // last char

    if (l == r) { // same char? keep checking
        String sub = s.substring(1, s.length() - 1);
        return isPalindrome(sub);
    }

    return false;
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.