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I have a hash of arrays.

%HoA = (
    'C1' =>  ['1', '3', '3', '3'],
    'C2' => ['3','2'],
    'C3' => ['1','3','3','4','5','5'],
    'C4'  => ['3','3','4'],
    'C5' => ['1'],
);

I would like to write a subroutine that returns a "sub copy" hash of arrays that contains the first N keys (and their values) of the original hash of arrays.

Something like this

my %HoA2 = new_partition(\%HoA, 3);

And it returns a new HoA data structure:

%HoA = (
    'C1' =>  ['1', '3', '3', '3'],
    'C2' => ['3','2'],
    'C3' => ['1','3','3','4','5','5'],
 );

Is there a way to do this by scratch without using a module?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There are no "first N elements", as the order of hash keys is not defined and thus, cannot be relied upon.

If you want any three elements instead of first three, you could use

%HoA = @HoA{ ( keys %HoA )[0..2] };
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Okay, I was just wondering if it was possible. I should probably remove my question before I get thumb downs. –  cooldood3490 Mar 30 '13 at 20:48
3  
It being impossible doesn't make it a bad question. Other people may need the same answer in the future. There is no need to remove it. –  jwueller Mar 30 '13 at 20:48
    
yeah I agree. this is actually good know. –  cooldood3490 Mar 30 '13 at 20:50
    
You can have a hash that retains the order in which keys are added. See: metacpan.org/module/Tie::IxHash –  ugexe Mar 30 '13 at 21:26
1  
Added a snippet that gets any three elements (as opposed to the first three). –  ikegami Mar 31 '13 at 2:04

As has been correctly stated, the order of elements in a hash is undefined. But if you can impose your own order on the elements, then it is simple enough to extract the elements that you require:

my %HoA = (
    'C1' => ['1', '3', '3', '3'],
    'C2' => ['3','2'],
    'C3' => ['1','3','3','4','5','5'],
    'C4' => ['3','3','4'],
    'C5' => ['1'],
);

# Use an array slice to grab the first 3 keys from a sorted list of %HoA keys.
# Use map to create a new hash that contains the keys and the values from the
# original hash:
my %HoA2 = map { $_ => $HoA{$_} } (sort keys %HoA)[0..2];

# Alternatively, specify the exact keys that you require:
my %HoA3 = map { $_ => $HoA{$_} } qw(C1 C2 C3);

# { C1 => [1, 3, 3, 3], C2 => [3, 2], C3 => [1, 3, 3, 4, 5, 5] }

Update

As Borodin points out, the above method copies references, so changes to one hash will be reflected in the other:

push @{$HoA{C1}}, 9;

# %HoA2 and %HoA3:
# { C1 => [1, 3, 3, 3, 9], C2 => [3, 2], C3 => [1, 3, 3, 4, 5, 5] }

To prevent that, copy the array itself:

my %HoA4 = map { $_ => [@{ $HoA{$_} }] } qw(C1 C2 C3);
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2  
This may be what is wanted, but it copies the array references, so if the data in the new hash is modified the changes will also be reflected in the old hash. To replicate the arrays as well, use my %HoA3 = map { $_ => [@{ $HoA{$_} }] } qw(C1 C2 C3) instead. –  Borodin Mar 30 '13 at 21:31
    
Borodin: thanks, good point. –  Mike Mar 31 '13 at 6:57

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