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I'm trying to implement a graph to store a list of data from a text file such as the following:

0,1 (node 0 links to 1)
0,2 (node 0 links to 2)
1,2 (node 1 links to 2)
2,1 (node 2 links to 1)

Anyways I come across trouble when it comes down to defining the structures. I'm torn between using a matrix or adjacent lists, but I think I will go with lists, I am just not sure how to define the structures. Should I use variable sized arrays, linked lists or something else? Which way would be the easiest?

struct grph{

};

struct node{

    //ID of the node
    int id;

};

Second, how do I store the data into this graph, this is where I come across the most trouble. Essentially, I thought it would be easy like linked lists where you just keep adding a node to the end. The difference here is that each node can point to many different nodes or to none at all. How do I link the graph structure with all the linked node structures?

When using linked lists for example, how would I store what node 0 connects to in the example above? I understand you use a matrix or list/array, but I'm seriously getting confused because of the lack of examples of such implementations in C. Any examples I found just made it much worse then I was before.

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4 Answers 4

This is just an example:

struct node{
        int id; 
        struct node **out;
        int num_out;
        /* optional: if you want doubly links */
        struct node **in;
        int num_in;
};

/* quick access to a node given an id */
struct node *node_list;

/* connect 'from' to 'to' */
void link(struct node *graph, int from, int to) {
        struct node *nfrom = &node_list[from], 
                    *nto   = &node_list[to];
        nfrom->num_out++;
        nfrom->out = realloc(nfrom->out, 
             sizeof(struct node*) * nfrom->num_out);
        nfrom->out[num_out-1] = nto;
        /* also do similar to nto->in if you want doubly links */
}
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It seems quite like my working, social networking... You could define the node and links seperately. In c language, you could define as:

struct graph_node{
    int id;
    struct node_following *following;
    struct graph_node *next_node;
}

struct node_following{
    int id;
    struct node_following *next_node;
}

For your example, the result is: root -> node0 -> node1 -> node2

The content of root might be: id = -1; following=NULL; next_node= node0

The content of node0 might be: id = 0; next_node = node1; following point to a list of node_following as: following -> {1, address of next node} -> {2, NULL}

The content of node1 might be: id = 1; next_node = node2; following point to a list of node_following as: following -> {2, NULL}

The content of node2 might be: id = 2; next_node = NULL; following point to a list of node_following as: following -> {1, NULL}

Essentially, it is a quesition on how to store a two-dimensional matrix. If the matrix is sparse, use the linked list. Otherwise, bitmap is a better solution.

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In answer to your first question: adjacency matrix vs adjacency lists? If you expect your graph to be dense, i.e. most nodes are adjacent with most other nodes, then go for the matrix as most operations are much easier on matrices. If you really need a transitive closure, then matrices are probably better also, as these tend to be dense. Otherwise adjacency lists are faster and smaller.

A graph would look as follows:

typedef struct node * node_p;
typedef struct edge * edge_p;

typedef struct edge
{       node_p  source, target;
        /* Add any data in the edges */
} edge;

typedef struct node
{       edge_p  * pred, * succ;
        node_p  next;
        /* Add any data in the nodes */
} node;

typedef struct graph
{       node_p  N;
} graph;

The N field of graph would start a linked list of the nodes of the graph using the next field of node to link the list. The pred and succ can be arrays allocated using malloc and realloc for the successor and predecessor edges in the graph (arrays of pointers to edges and NULL terminated). Even though keeping both successor and predecessors may seem redundant, you will find that most graph algorithms like to be able to walk both ways. The source and target field of an edge point back to the nodes. If you don't expect to store data in the edges, then you could let the pred and succ arrays point back directly to the nodes and forget about the edge type.

Don't try to use realloc on N in the graph because all the addresses of the nodes may change and these are heavily used in the remainder of the graph.

P.S: Personally I prefer circular linked lists over NULL ended linked lists, because the code for most, if not all, operations are much simpler. In that case graph would contain a (dummy) node instead of a pointer.

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You could do something like this:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

typedef struct
{
  void* pElements;
  size_t ElementSize;
  size_t Count; // how many elements exist
  size_t TotalCount; // for how many elements space allocated
} tArray;

void ArrayInit(tArray* pArray, size_t ElementSize)
{
  pArray->pElements = NULL;
  pArray->ElementSize = ElementSize;
  pArray->TotalCount = pArray->Count = 0;
}

void ArrayDestroy(tArray* pArray)
{
  free(pArray->pElements);
  ArrayInit(pArray, 0);
}

int ArrayGrowByOne(tArray* pArray)
{
  if (pArray->Count == pArray->TotalCount) // used up all allocated space
  {
    size_t newTotalCount, newTotalSize;
    void* p;

    if (pArray->TotalCount == 0)
    {
      newTotalCount = 1;
    }
    else
    {
      newTotalCount = 2 * pArray->TotalCount; // double the allocated count
      if (newTotalCount / 2 != pArray->TotalCount) // count overflow
        return 0;
    }

    newTotalSize = newTotalCount * pArray->ElementSize;
    if (newTotalSize / pArray->ElementSize != newTotalCount) // size overflow
      return 0;

    p = realloc(pArray->pElements, newTotalSize);
    if (p == NULL) // out of memory
      return 0;

    pArray->pElements = p;
    pArray->TotalCount = newTotalCount;
  }

  pArray->Count++;
  return 1;
}

int ArrayInsertElement(tArray* pArray, size_t pos, void* pElement)
{
  if (pos > pArray->Count) // bad position
    return 0;

  if (!ArrayGrowByOne(pArray)) // couldn't grow
    return 0;

  if (pos < pArray->Count - 1)
    memmove((char*)pArray->pElements + (pos + 1) * pArray->ElementSize,
           (char*)pArray->pElements + pos * pArray->ElementSize,
           (pArray->Count - 1 - pos) * pArray->ElementSize);

  memcpy((char*)pArray->pElements + pos * pArray->ElementSize,
         pElement,
         pArray->ElementSize);

  return 1;
}

typedef struct
{
  int Id;

  int Data;

  tArray LinksTo; // links from this node to other nodes (array of Id's)
  tArray LinksFrom; // back links from other nodes to this node (array of Id's)
} tNode;

typedef struct
{
  tArray Nodes;
} tGraph;

void GraphInit(tGraph* pGraph)
{
  ArrayInit(&pGraph->Nodes, sizeof(tNode));
}

void GraphPrintNodes(tGraph* pGraph)
{
  size_t i, j;

  if (pGraph->Nodes.Count == 0)
  {
    printf("Empty graph.\n");
  }

  for (i = 0; i < pGraph->Nodes.Count; i++)
  {
    tNode* pNode = (tNode*)pGraph->Nodes.pElements + i;

    printf("Node %d:\n  Data: %d\n", pNode->Id, pNode->Data);

    if (pNode->LinksTo.Count)
    {
      printf("  Links to:\n");

      for (j = 0; j < pNode->LinksTo.Count; j++)
      {
        int* p = (int*)pNode->LinksTo.pElements + j;
        printf("    Node %d\n", *p);
      }
    }
  }
}

void GraphDestroy(tGraph* pGraph)
{
  size_t i;

  for (i = 0; i < pGraph->Nodes.Count; i++)
  {
    tNode* pNode = (tNode*)pGraph->Nodes.pElements + i;
    ArrayDestroy(&pNode->LinksTo);
    ArrayDestroy(&pNode->LinksFrom);
  }

  ArrayDestroy(&pGraph->Nodes);
}

int NodeIdComparator(const void* p1, const void* p2)
{
  const tNode* pa = p1;
  const tNode* pb = p2;

  if (pa->Id < pb->Id)
    return -1;
  if (pa->Id > pb->Id)
    return 1;
  return 0;
}

int IntComparator(const void* p1, const void* p2)
{
  const int* pa = p1;
  const int* pb = p2;

  if (*pa < *pb)
    return -1;
  if (*pa > *pb)
    return 1;
  return 0;
}

size_t GraphFindNodeIndexById(tGraph* pGraph, int Id)
{
  tNode* pNode = bsearch(&Id,
                         pGraph->Nodes.pElements,
                         pGraph->Nodes.Count,
                         pGraph->Nodes.ElementSize,
                         &NodeIdComparator);

  if (pNode == NULL)
    return (size_t)-1;

  return pNode - (tNode*)pGraph->Nodes.pElements;
}

int GraphInsertNode(tGraph* pGraph, int Id, int Data)
{
  size_t idx = GraphFindNodeIndexById(pGraph, Id);
  tNode node;

  if (idx != (size_t)-1) // node with this Id already exist
    return 0;

  node.Id = Id;
  node.Data = Data;
  ArrayInit(&node.LinksTo, sizeof(int));
  ArrayInit(&node.LinksFrom, sizeof(int));

  if (!ArrayInsertElement(&pGraph->Nodes, pGraph->Nodes.Count, &node))
    return 0;

  qsort(pGraph->Nodes.pElements,
        pGraph->Nodes.Count,
        pGraph->Nodes.ElementSize,
        &NodeIdComparator); // maintain order for binary search

  return 1;
}

int GraphLinkNodes(tGraph* pGraph, int IdFrom, int IdTo)
{
  size_t idxFrom = GraphFindNodeIndexById(pGraph, IdFrom);
  size_t idxTo = GraphFindNodeIndexById(pGraph, IdTo);
  tNode *pFrom, *pTo;

  if (idxFrom == (size_t)-1 || idxTo == (size_t)-1) // one or both nodes don't exist
    return 0;

  pFrom = (tNode*)pGraph->Nodes.pElements + idxFrom;
  pTo = (tNode*)pGraph->Nodes.pElements + idxTo;

  // link IdFrom -> IdTo
  if (bsearch(&IdTo,
              pFrom->LinksTo.pElements,
              pFrom->LinksTo.Count,
              pFrom->LinksTo.ElementSize,
              &IntComparator) == NULL) // IdFrom doesn't link to IdTo yet
  {
    if (!ArrayInsertElement(&pFrom->LinksTo, pFrom->LinksTo.Count, &IdTo))
      return 0;

    qsort(pFrom->LinksTo.pElements,
          pFrom->LinksTo.Count,
          pFrom->LinksTo.ElementSize,
          &IntComparator); // maintain order for binary search
  }

  // back link IdFrom <- IdTo
  if (bsearch(&IdFrom,
              pTo->LinksFrom.pElements,
              pTo->LinksFrom.Count,
              pTo->LinksFrom.ElementSize,
              &IntComparator) == NULL) // IdFrom doesn't link to IdTo yet
  {
    if (!ArrayInsertElement(&pTo->LinksFrom, pTo->LinksFrom.Count, &IdFrom))
      return 0;

    qsort(pTo->LinksFrom.pElements,
          pTo->LinksFrom.Count,
          pTo->LinksFrom.ElementSize,
          &IntComparator); // maintain order for binary search
  }

  return 1;
}

int main(void)
{
  tGraph g;

  printf("\nCreating empty graph...\n");
  GraphInit(&g);
  GraphPrintNodes(&g);

  printf("\nInserting nodes...\n");
  GraphInsertNode(&g, 0, 0);
  GraphInsertNode(&g, 1, 101);
  GraphInsertNode(&g, 2, 202);
  GraphPrintNodes(&g);

  printf("\nLinking nodes...\n");
  GraphLinkNodes(&g, 0, 1);
  GraphLinkNodes(&g, 0, 2);
  GraphLinkNodes(&g, 1, 2);
  GraphLinkNodes(&g, 2, 1);
  GraphPrintNodes(&g);

  printf("\nDestroying graph...\n");
  GraphDestroy(&g);
  GraphPrintNodes(&g);

  // repeat
  printf("\nLet's repeat...\n");

  printf("\nCreating empty graph...\n");
  GraphInit(&g);
  GraphPrintNodes(&g);

  printf("\nInserting nodes...\n");
  GraphInsertNode(&g, 1, 111);
  GraphInsertNode(&g, 2, 222);
  GraphInsertNode(&g, 3, 333);
  GraphPrintNodes(&g);

  printf("\nLinking nodes...\n");
  GraphLinkNodes(&g, 1, 2);
  GraphLinkNodes(&g, 2, 3);
  GraphLinkNodes(&g, 3, 1);
  GraphPrintNodes(&g);

  printf("\nDestroying graph...\n");
  GraphDestroy(&g);
  GraphPrintNodes(&g);

  return 0;
}

Output (ideone):

Creating empty graph...
Empty graph.

Inserting nodes...
Node 0:
  Data: 0
Node 1:
  Data: 101
Node 2:
  Data: 202

Linking nodes...
Node 0:
  Data: 0
  Links to:
    Node 1
    Node 2
Node 1:
  Data: 101
  Links to:
    Node 2
Node 2:
  Data: 202
  Links to:
    Node 1

Destroying graph...
Empty graph.

Let's repeat...

Creating empty graph...
Empty graph.

Inserting nodes...
Node 1:
  Data: 111
Node 2:
  Data: 222
Node 3:
  Data: 333

Linking nodes...
Node 1:
  Data: 111
  Links to:
    Node 2
Node 2:
  Data: 222
  Links to:
    Node 3
Node 3:
  Data: 333
  Links to:
    Node 1

Destroying graph...
Empty graph.
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