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I have diffs that I postprocess and want to flatten out equal lines. Here is one example:

Foo
-Bar
+Bar
Baz

I want to squash the lines down that are equal so they don't show up in the diff anymore. This is pretty simple with

-(.*)\n\+\1\n

The problems start when I have multi-line matches like:

-Foo
-Bar
+Foo
+Bar

Any ideas? Or should I not do a RegEx and write a simple parser? Or does one already exist?

Some backstory if there is a better solution. I'm diffing two files to see if they are the same. Sadly the outputs are nearly identical but need some postprocessing, for example

-on line %d
+on line 8

so I'm going through and converting known strings to other known strings and then I'm trying to check if the diff is empty or still is different.

share|improve this question
    
Why don't you apply the diff result to the original file with patch ( jungels.net/articles/diff-patch-ten-minutes.html ) and re-run diff? That could be implemented in 5 minutes. –  Michael W Mar 31 '13 at 14:16

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You could use s modifier and positive lookahead:

  • with s modifier you can also match new line with dot
  • with positive lookahead you can find occurances of the match without making it a part of the match (which skips everything in between...).

Here is sample matching at regexpal.

Here is C# regex sample that should be close to what you need:

var sourceString = @"-Foo
    +Foo
    la
    -Bar
    +Foo
    la
    -Ko
    +Bar
    la
    +Ko
    -Ena
    asdsda
    -Dva
    +Ena
    +Dva
    ";
Regex ItemRegex = new Regex(@"(?s)\-(.*?)\n(?=(.*?)(\+\1))", RegexOptions.Compiled);
foreach (Match ItemMatch in ItemRegex.Matches(sourceString))
{
    Console.WriteLine(ItemMatch);
}
share|improve this answer

I've done some simpler analysis of diff output before, so I have a Perl script that gave me a basis to start from. Consider the following two data files, file.1 and file.2.

file.1

Data

Foo
Bar 1
Baz

I want to squash the lines down that are equal so they don't show up in the diff anymore. This is pretty simple with

-(.*)\n\+\1\n

The problems start when I have multi-line matches like:

Foo 2
Bar 2

Etc.

file.2

Data

Foo
Bar 10
Baz

I want to squash the lines down that are equal so they don't show up in the diff anymore. This is pretty simple with

-(.*)\n\+\1\n

The problems start when I have multi-line matches like:

Foo 20
Bar 20

Etc.

Raw diff output

The raw unified diff output is:

--- file.1  2013-03-30 18:58:35.000000000 -0700
+++ file.2  2013-03-30 18:58:48.000000000 -0700
@@ -1,7 +1,7 @@
 Data

 Foo
-Bar 1
+Bar 10
 Baz

 I want to squash the lines down that are equal so they don't show up in the diff anymore. This is pretty simple with
@@ -10,7 +10,7 @@

 The problems start when I have multi-line matches like:

-Foo 2
-Bar 2
+Foo 20
+Bar 20

 Etc.

Post-processed output

Now, after post-processing, all the digit strings have been replaced with ##, so the post-processed file looks like:

--- file.1  2013-03-30 18:58:35.000000000 -0700
+++ file.2  2013-03-30 18:58:48.000000000 -0700
@@ -1,7 +1,7 @@
 Data

 Foo
-Bar ##
+Bar ##
 Baz

 I want to squash the lines down that are equal so they don't show up in the diff anymore. This is pretty simple with
@@ -10,7 +10,7 @@

 The problems start when I have multi-line matches like:

-Foo ##
-Bar ##
+Foo ##
+Bar ##

 Etc.

This is the input to the program that will analyze whether the differences are still real or not.

To be truly useful, we have to isolate the header lines (--- and +++) and keep them. For each block of diffs that starts @@, we need to capture adjacent lines of - and + lines, and:

  1. Check that the number of lines is the same for + and -
  2. Check that the contents of the - lines is the same as the contents of the + lines.
  3. Remember that although the sample data doesn't show it, you can have several blocks of - and + lines in a single @@ section.
  4. If there are no differences left in the @@ block, the whole block can be discarded.
  5. If there are differences, then we need to output the header lines if they were not previously output.
  6. If there are differences, then output the whole block of diffs.

Rinse and repeat.

My programming language of choice for this is Perl.

checkdiffs.pl

#!/usr/bin/env perl
use strict;
use warnings;
use constant debug => 0;

my $file1;
my $file2;
my $header = 0;

OUTER:
while (my $line = <>)
{
    chomp $line;
    print "[$line]\n" if debug;
    if ($line =~ m/^--- /)
    {
        $file1 = $line;
        $file2 = <>;
        chomp $file2;
        print "[$file2]\n" if debug;
        if ($file2 !~ m/^\+\+\+ /)
        {
            print STDERR "Unexpected file identification lines\n";
            print STDERR "$file1\n";
            print STDERR "$file2\n";
            next OUTER;
        }
        $header = 0;    # Have not output file header yet

        my @lines;
        my $atline;

        last OUTER unless defined($line = <>);
INNER:
        while ($line =~ m/^@@ /)
        {
            chomp $line;
            print "@[$line]\n" if debug;
            $atline = $line;
            @lines  = ();

            while (defined($line = <>) && $line =~ m/^[- +]/)
            {
                chomp $line;
                print ":[$line]\n" if debug;
                push @lines, $line;
            }
            # Got a complete @@ block of diffs
            post_process($atline, @lines);

            last OUTER if !defined($line);
            next INNER if ($line =~ m/^@@ /);
            print STDERR "Unexpected input line: [$line]\n";
            last OUTER;
        }
    }
}

sub differences
{
    my($pref, $mref) = @_;
    my $pnum = scalar(@$pref);
    my $mnum = scalar(@$mref);
    print "-->> differences\n" if debug;
    return 0 if ($pnum == 0 && $mnum == 0);
    return 1 if ($pnum != $mnum);
    foreach my $i (0..($pnum-1))
    {
        my $pline = substr(${$pref}[$i], 1);
        my $mline = substr(${$mref}[$i], 1);
        return 1 if ($pline ne $mline);
    }
    print "<<-- differences\n" if debug;
    return 0;
}

sub post_process
{
    my($atline, @lines) = @_;

    print "-->> post_process\n" if debug;
    # Work out whether there are any differences left
    my @plines = ();    # +lines
    my @mlines = ();    # -lines
    my $diffs  = 0;
    my $ptype  = ' ';   # Previous line type

    foreach my $line (@lines)
    {
        print "---- $line\n" if debug;
        my ($ctype) = ($line =~ m/^(.)/);
        if ($ctype eq ' ')
        {
            if (($ptype eq '-' || $ptype eq '+') && differences(\@plines, \@mlines))
            {
                $diffs = 1;
                last;
            }
            @plines = ();
            @mlines = ();
        }
        elsif ($ctype eq '-')
        {
            push @mlines, $line;
        }
        elsif ($ctype eq '+')
        {
            push @plines, $line;
        }
        else
        {
            print STDERR "Unexpected input line format: $line\n";
            exit 1;
        }
        $ptype = $ctype;
    }

    $diffs = 1 if differences(\@plines, \@mlines);

    if ($diffs != 0)
    {
        # Print the block of differences, preceded by file header if necessary
        if ($header == 0)
        {
            print "$file1\n";
            print "$file2\n";
            $header = 1;
        }
        print "$atline\n";
        foreach my $line (@lines)
        {
            print "$line\n";
        }
    }

    print "<<-- post_process\n" if debug;
    return;
}

Tested with the data file, and with three variants:

$ perl checkdiffs.pl data
$ perl checkdiffs.pl data.0
--- file.1  2013-03-30 18:58:35.000000000 -0700
+++ file.2  2013-03-30 18:58:48.000000000 -0700
@@ -1,7 +1,7 @@
 Data

 Foo
-Bar #0
+Bar ##
 Baz

 I want to squash the lines down that are equal so they don't show up in the diff anymore. This is pretty simple with
$ perl checkdiffs.pl data.1
--- file.1  2013-03-30 18:58:35.000000000 -0700
+++ file.2  2013-03-30 18:58:48.000000000 -0700
@@ -10,7 +10,7 @@

 The problems start when I have multi-line matches like:

-Foo #0
-Bar ##
+Foo ##
+Bar ##

 Etc.
$ perl checkdiffs.pl data.2
--- file.1  2013-03-30 18:58:35.000000000 -0700
+++ file.2  2013-03-30 18:58:48.000000000 -0700
@@ -1,7 +1,7 @@
 Data

 Foo
-Bar #0
+Bar ##
 Baz

 I want to squash the lines down that are equal so they don't show up in the diff anymore. This is pretty simple with
@@ -10,7 +10,7 @@

 The problems start when I have multi-line matches like:

-Foo ##
-Bar #0
+Foo ##
+Bar ##

 Etc.
$ 

Does that meet your requirements?

share|improve this answer

I think this might work (unless you have repeated pairs):

   sed 's/^[-+]//' filename | perl -ne 'print unless $seen{$_}++'

Replace starting +/- with null string. Then pick only unique lines.

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