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I am implementing a class called Sprt (basically a smart pointer as a exercise) and below is the declaration. I have omitted the implementation for clarity. Also there are 2 classes to test it. I have included their codes. But when I write test code in the function basic_tests_1 I get compiler errors. I didnot clearly understand how to solve it. What is the problems?

#include <iostream>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <assert.h>

namespace my {
    template <class T>
    class Sptr {
    private:
        //some kind of pointer
            //one to current obj
        T obj;
        size_t reference_count;
            //one to original obj
    public:
        Sptr();

        template <typename U> 
        Sptr(U *);

        Sptr(const Sptr &);

        template <typename U> 
        Sptr(const Sptr<U> &);

        template <typename U> 
        Sptr<T> &operator=(const Sptr<U> &);

        void reset();

        T* operator->() const
        {return &obj;};

        T& operator*() const
        {return obj;};

        T* get() const
        {return &obj;};

    };
}


using namespace std;
using namespace my;
/* Basic Tests 1 ================================================================================ */

class Base1 {
    protected:
        Base1() : derived_destructor_called(false) {
            printf("Base1::Base1()\n");
        }
    private:
        Base1(const Base1 &); // Disallow.
        Base1 &operator=(const Base1 &); // Disallow.
    protected:
        ~Base1() {
            printf("Base1::~Base1()\n");
            assert(derived_destructor_called);
        }
    protected:
        bool derived_destructor_called;
};

class Derived : public Base1 {
        friend void basic_tests_1();
    private:
        Derived() {}
        Derived(const Derived &); // Disallow.
        Derived &operator=(const Derived &); // Disallow.
    public:
        ~Derived() {
            printf("Derived::~Derived()\n");
            derived_destructor_called = true;
        }
        int value;
};


void basic_tests_1() {


    // Test deleting through original class.
    {
        // Base1 created directly with Derived *.
        {
            Sptr<Base1> sp(new Derived);
            {
                // Test copy constructor.
                Sptr<Base1> sp2(sp);
            }
        }
        // Base1 assigned from Sptr<Derived>.
        {
            Sptr<Base1> sp2;
            {
                Sptr<Derived> sp(new Derived);
                // Test template copy constructor.
                Sptr<Base1> sp3(sp);
                sp2 = sp;
                sp2 = sp2;
            }
        }
    }
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {

    cout << "Hello world";
    basic_tests_1();

    return 0;
}

Here is the compiler error:

Sptr.cpp: In destructor ‘my::Sptr<Base1>::~Sptr()’:
Sptr.cpp:109:9: error: ‘Base1::~Base1()’ is protected
Sptr.cpp:8:8: error: within this context
Sptr.cpp: In function ‘void basic_tests_1()’:
Sptr.cpp:142:39: note: synthesized method ‘my::Sptr<Base1>::~Sptr()’ first required here 
Sptr.cpp: In member function ‘my::Sptr<Base1>& my::Sptr<Base1>::operator=(const my::Sptr<Base1>&)’:
Sptr.cpp:107:16: error: ‘Base1& Base1::operator=(const Base1&)’ is private
Sptr.cpp:8:8: error: within this context
Sptr.cpp: In function ‘void basic_tests_1()’:
Sptr.cpp:156:23: note: synthesized method ‘my::Sptr<Base1>& my::Sptr<Base1>::operator=(const my::Sptr<Base1>&)’ first required here 
Sptr.cpp: In instantiation of ‘my::Sptr<T>::Sptr(U*) [with U = Derived; T = Base1]’:
Sptr.cpp:142:39:   required from here
Sptr.cpp:102:9: error: ‘Base1::Base1()’ is protected
Sptr.cpp:56:20: error: within this context
Sptr.cpp:109:9: error: ‘Base1::~Base1()’ is protected
Sptr.cpp:56:20: error: within this context
Sptr.cpp: In instantiation of ‘my::Sptr<T>::Sptr(const my::Sptr<T>&) [with T = Base1]’:
Sptr.cpp:145:35:   required from here
Sptr.cpp:102:9: error: ‘Base1::Base1()’ is protected
Sptr.cpp:61:38: error: within this context
Sptr.cpp:109:9: error: ‘Base1::~Base1()’ is protected
Sptr.cpp:61:38: error: within this context
Sptr.cpp: In instantiation of ‘my::Sptr<T>::Sptr() [with T = Base1]’:
Sptr.cpp:150:25:   required from here
Sptr.cpp:102:9: error: ‘Base1::Base1()’ is protected
Sptr.cpp:50:16: error: within this context
Sptr.cpp:109:9: error: ‘Base1::~Base1()’ is protected
Sptr.cpp:50:16: error: within this context
Sptr.cpp: In instantiation of ‘my::Sptr<T>::Sptr(U*) [with U = Derived; T = Derived]’:
Sptr.cpp:152:45:   required from here
Sptr.cpp:120:9: error: ‘Derived::Derived()’ is private
Sptr.cpp:56:20: error: within this context
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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Looks like your base1 destructor should be made public. You should also declare it as virtual as well or the derived class destructor will not be called correctly. Also, you are defining the operator= in base1 and derived as private and then trying to use them when you assign one instance of your shared ptr to another in the test code. The remaining errors relate to the base1 constructor being protected, which means you can't instantiate it directly. You could make the constructor public if you really want to create base1 objects.

share|improve this answer
    
It still has errors from the error ‘Base1& Base1::operator=(const Base1&)’ is private to below. If I make all methods public too this error stays. –  footy Mar 31 '13 at 2:08
1  
+1 to making the destructor virtual. Also, why is it that a smart pointer class is not exactly storing a pointer but a value. Shouldn't this be T* obj? Apart from that, doing as JS recommends should/will work. If it doesn't do update with the new code and the new errors you get after you've made those change. –  user2184879 Mar 31 '13 at 5:16

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