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Two nested div's, the outer is identified by the ID and the inner is identified by a class:

<div id="theID">
    <div class="aClass">Class inside ID</div>
</div>

Let's say we have rules for both class and ID

.aClass {color: green; }
#theID { color: yellow; }

Per my understanding both rules apply to the text, so the one with higher specificity (#theID) should win.

However for some reason the class rule wins and the text is rendered green.

Why is that?

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1  
I encourage you to read the whole of section 6 of the CSS 2.1 spec It explains the process of establishing the used values for elements, including how the cascade works, specificity's place in that, and where in the process inheritance applies. –  Alohci Mar 31 '13 at 2:28

4 Answers 4

#theID is more specific to the outer div (direct style, as opposed to inherited style) so all text within there will be yellow. However .aClass is more specific to the inner div so everything inside it will be green (the direct style) not yellow (the inherited style).

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The use of the word "specific" here is confusing, considering that CSS has a very, er, specific, definition of specificity. –  BoltClock Mar 31 '13 at 10:57

Thanks everyone. In other words, specificity prioritisation is only used if there are several rules applied DIRECTLY to the element.

Otherwise the parent's style sheet applies which is calculated similarly.

One more illustration:

<div id="theID">
    <div class="aClass">
      <p>Class inside ID and within P</p>
    </div>
</div>

And CSS:

.aClass p {
    text-transform: lowercase;
}
#theID p {
    text-transform: uppercase;
}

Here both rules apply directly to the <p> element, buth of those two the second applies having higher specificity due to presence of an ID selector.

So the resulting text will be uppercase.

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Yes, this is correct. Specificity becomes a non-issue when the rules target different elements altogether. –  BoltClock Mar 31 '13 at 11:58

Browser collects/reads the css informations from outer to inner elements.

Outer element will be called first and then the inner elements.

<div id="theID">
   I am Yellow
   <div class="aClass">I am Green</div>
</div>

another example:

<div id="theID">
   I am Yellow
   <div class="aClass">
       <span style="color:purple">
          I am purple
       </span>
   </div>
</div>

Last elements style will always win.

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Every element has all CSS properties. In this case, there are two div elements, and each of them has its own color property. Those properties are set here explicitly for both elements, with no conflicting CSS rules, so there is no question about specificity or inheritance.

The text “Class inside ID” is textual content of the inner div element, so it gets its color. The color setting for the outer element would affect any text inside that element that is not wrapped in an inner element with its own color set, but there is no such text, so the setting has no effect.

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