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I'm doing some string manipulation, and am looping through a string with a string iterator, and under certain conditions insert a character into the string. Here is the code:

string * const Expression::process(char * const s)
{
    if(s == NULL)
    {
        printf("(from Expression::process())\n > NULL data");
        return NULL;
    }

    string *rtrn = new string(s);
    string garbage;

    //EDIT
    rtrn->erase(remove(rtrn->begin(), rtrn->end(), ' '), rtrn->end());

    for(string::iterator j = rtrn->begin(); (j+2) != rtrn->end(); j++)
    {
        if(Operator::isValid(&*j, garbage) != Operator::SYM && *(j+1) == '-' &&            (Operator::isValid(&(*(j+2)), garbage) != Operator::INVALID))
            rtrn->replace(j+1, j+2, "+-");
    }

    rtrn->insert(rtrn->begin(), '(');
    rtrn->append(")");
    for(string::iterator k = rtrn->begin(); k+1 != rtrn->end(); k++)
    {
        if(*k == '-' && !Operator::isValidNum(*(k+1)))
            rtrn->replace(k, k+1, "-1*");
        if((Operator::isValid(&*(k+1), garbage) != Operator::INVALID && (Operator::isValid(&*(k+1), garbage) != Operator::SYM || *(k+1)=='(')) &&
            (Operator::isValid(&*k, garbage) == Operator::VAR || Operator::isValidNum(*k) || *k==')') &&
        !(Operator::isValid(&*k, garbage) == Operator::NUM && Operator::isValid(&*(k+1), garbage) == Operator::NUM))
        {
            if(Operator::isValid(&*k, garbage) == Operator::SYM)
            {
                if(opSymb::valid[garbage]->getArguments())
                    rtrn->insert(k+1, '*');
            }
            else
            {
                rtrn->insert(k+1, '*');
            }
        }
    }

return rtrn;
}

When s is equal to "20x(5x+3)-6x(5x^2+11/2)", I get a runtime error at rtrn->insert(k+1, '*'); under the else statement when it gets to "5x^2" in the string. Basically, when it makes the 6th insertion, it crashes on me and complains about the iterator + operator being out of range. Although, when I'm debugging, it does pass the correct offset. And it does successfully insert the char into the string, but after the function executes, the iterator is pointing to corrupt data.

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1  
Your erasing loop should be a call to std::remove (with the erase-remove idiom, of course). –  chris Mar 31 '13 at 3:53
    
Suddenly not working is often in the same class of problems of "it works by coincidence". –  Nathan Ernst Mar 31 '13 at 7:16
    
The erase isn't the issue. –  bathtub Mar 31 '13 at 14:44
    
string *rtrn = new string(s); I weep for your code –  jalf Mar 31 '13 at 14:47
    
Well I'm trying to learn, so actual explanation of why that's bad practice or how it should be implemented would be helpful. Save the non-constructive criticism –  bathtub Mar 31 '13 at 15:09

2 Answers 2

for(string::iterator i = rtrn->begin(); i != rtrn->end(); i++) { if(*i == ' ') rtrn->erase(i); }

There are errors in this and all code snippets like this: for loop can`t be used for deleting element from a container, becase erase() - invalidates all iterators related to the container,
I offer you to use while loop instead, here is a short example from another question I answered:

string::iterator it = input.begin();

while (it != input.end())
{
     while( it != input.end() && isdigit(*it))
     {
          it = input.erase(it);
     }
     if (it != input.end())
         ++it;
}
share|improve this answer
    
So the erasing is corrupting the data? I don't think that's the problem though, because for the string I pass in this scenario, there are no spaces and it never deletes any elements –  bathtub Mar 31 '13 at 14:30
    
No, erasing does not corrupt data, but it does invalidate iterators pointing into the string –  jalf Mar 31 '13 at 14:48
    
Okay, well, that might be a problem in a different instance, but erase was never called on this data. –  bathtub Mar 31 '13 at 14:49
1  
With std::string, it is not just erase that invalidates iterators, but every modifying member function (though in practice, it might be limited to those members that affect the length of the string). –  Bart van Ingen Schenau Mar 31 '13 at 15:14
    
Okay. This comment actually explains it. How would I safely add/insert memory/characters into the string. Do I need to use resize or something? –  bathtub Mar 31 '13 at 15:25

So after research and help from you guys, it seems I have to refine my code so that any string functions such as erase, insert, or replace writes over the iterator passed to the function. So I need to change my code to something like this

for(string::iterator k = rtrn->begin(), m=k+1; m != rtrn->end(); k=m, m=k+1)
{
    if(*k == '-' && !Operator::isValidNum(*m))
        rtrn->replace(k, m, "-1*");
    if((Operator::isValid(&*m, garbage) != Operator::INVALID && (Operator::isValid(&*m, garbage) != Operator::SYM || *m=='(')) &&
    (Operator::isValid(&*k, garbage) == Operator::VAR || Operator::isValidNum(*k) || *k==')') &&
    !(Operator::isValid(&*k, garbage) == Operator::NUM && Operator::isValid(&*m, garbage) == Operator::NUM))
    {
        if(Operator::isValid(&*k, garbage) == Operator::SYM)
        {
            if(opSymb::valid[garbage]->getArguments())
        rtrn->insert(m, '*');
        }
        else
        {
            m=rtrn->insert(m, '*');
        }
    }
}
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