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I was trying to make this text change matrix movie like effect in JavaScript.The basic concept was that there is a div present in html and JavaScript take that div's inner text and manipulate it to create the continuously changing random text effect like in matrix movie. I am quite new to JavaScript, I am having hard time figuring out the logic behind the animation like the each steps, one step after another like what will happen next in whole animation process.

Anyways, I tried to make it on my own but as you can suspect i failed.

Here is my code :

<html>
<head>
    <script>

        var text = document.getElementById("text").innerText;
        var length_var = text.length;
        var possible = [];
        var possible_text ="ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz0123456789";
        var counter = 0;
        var arr_text = [];

        var new_func = function(){
            arr_text[Math.floor(Math.random() * length_var)] = possible.charAt(Math.floor(Math.random() * possible.length));
            alert(arr_text);

        };

        var call_func = function(){

            for(var i=0; i<=possible_text.length; i++){
                possible[i] = possible_text.charAt(i);
            }

            for(var i=0; i<= length_var ; i++){
                arr_text[i] = text.charAt(i);
            }

            setInterval(new_func, 100);

        };

    </script>
</head>
<body onload="call_func()">

    <div id="text">
        Hello There!
    </div>
</body>
</html>

What I was planning to do can be seen on this page, as I was highly motivated to do this effect on my own.

Link : http://events.ccc.de/congress/2012/wiki/Main_Page

The header text of the page contains such animation.

Please Help

share|improve this question
    
Probably more suited to code review. –  RobG Mar 31 '13 at 4:00
    
ok, now i have posted there as well –  monk Mar 31 '13 at 4:10
    
@monk the link you've given has an expired SSL certificate. –  ShuklaSannidhya Mar 31 '13 at 4:16
    
you can remove the 's' from https. its a chaos communication congress latest event wiki page. –  monk Mar 31 '13 at 4:20

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This changes the string sequentially.

function main() {
    "use strict";
    var counter = 0, all = "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz0123456789";
    var $_inter = setInterval(function() {
        var text = document.getElementById("text");
        text.innerHTML = text.innerHTML.substring(0, counter) + all.charAt(Math.floor(Math.random()*all.length)) + text.innerHTML.substring(counter+1);
        counter = (counter+1)%text.innerHTML.length;
    }, 100);
}
window.onload = main;
share|improve this answer

The crux of the program that's on the site (which is really, really ugly) involves creating an array of "haXX0r-like" characters, and then injecting them and removing them from the text.

They also speed up and slow down their process, and bounce between doing an addition pass and a removal pass, from what I saw on my quick read-through.

The downside of their code are that it's all a bunch of loops slopped together, with a bunch of "if"s to contain two or three loops, one after the other... ...and then they add "mode-switching" to that, where they say "if we're in mode-1 add stuff and do it quickly, and if we're in mode-2, remove stuff and lower the speed and if we're in this submode of either mode, set the speed accordingly, and if the speed is greater than this or less than that, and we're in this mode, then stop what we're doing, wait 5 seconds and call it again"...

...not pretty.

But they're starting with a quote, finding a random spot in the string, and then replacing the character at that spot with the character, plus the new "<", "?", "{", etc...

And speeding up and slowing down, as they add and remove the randomly-chosen character-type.

share|improve this answer
    
how can you change the character at particular position while storing it in an array and then replacing the same position character in web screen too? –  monk Mar 31 '13 at 4:40
    
i tried doing that using charAT but says left hand side assignment or something like that error.. i was doing like this string.charAt(i) = randompost.charAt(i) –  monk Mar 31 '13 at 4:41
    
@monk it was giving you a "left-hand side" error because .charAt() returns the letter at that position. If string.charAt(3) === "a"; then you were basically saying "a" = "{"; and the computer disagreed with you. var i = random(), start = string.slice(0, i), end = string.slice(i); string = start + characters(random()) + end; would be a quick and dirty way to modify the value of string to inject something between letters that are supposed to be there. –  Norguard Mar 31 '13 at 4:54
    
thankyou very much for clarifying me this. thankyou –  monk Mar 31 '13 at 5:01
    
@monk PS: random() doesn't actually exit, you'll have to make it, or use Math.floor(Math.random() * string.length). Putting that out there, just in case dealing with random numbers in JS is new to you. –  Norguard Mar 31 '13 at 5:06

Try this-

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
    <head>
        <script type="text/javascript">
        function randString(len) {
            "use strict";
               var i, out="", all ="ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz0123456789";
                for (i = 0; i < len; i++) {
                    out += all.charAt(Math.floor(Math.random()*all.length));
                }
            return out;
        }
        function main() {
            "use strict";
            var $_inter = setInterval(function() {
                var text = document.getElementById("text");
                text.innerHTML = randString(text.innerHTML.length);
            }, 100);
        }
        window.onload = main;
        </script>
    </head>
    <body>
        <div id="text">Hello World!</div>
    </body>
</html>
share|improve this answer
    
thankyou, one question though, why to use strict mode why not normally? –  monk Mar 31 '13 at 4:31
    
@monk I like to write JSLINT proof code. It's just your choice. –  ShuklaSannidhya Mar 31 '13 at 4:33
    
can you please help me change the texts, sequentially like first, the middle character then the first or the second and then the third like that –  monk Mar 31 '13 at 4:33
    
@Sann—so why is "use strict" only used in function context and not global? Why use CDATA in an HTML document? –  RobG Mar 31 '13 at 4:37
1  
@Sann CDATA in html really isn't needed at this point, unless you're trying to guarantee that your pages validate in html4.01-strict or xhtml... ...which is pointless, if you're using the html doctype. Doing things like using JS to comment CDATA which comments html-comments has been pointless since Netscape Navigator died. –  Norguard Mar 31 '13 at 5:08

If you want something that will randomise a string and slowly replace each character with the original, here's something that may suit. The replacement order is random too, so the string is replaced out of order but ends up with the original string.

A fancier solution is to give each letter its own timer with a different lag so they run at different speeds, and for different lengths of time. But that might suck some serious system resources for a big string.

function Randomiser(el, count, delay) {
  this.element = el;
  this.originalText = el.textContent || el.innerText || '';
  this.places = [];
  this.currentText = [];
  this.count = count || 3;   // iterations before fixing a character
  this.delay = delay || 100; // milliseconds between updates
  this.iteration = 0;
  this.startTime = new Date();

  var i = this.originalText.length;

  while (i--) {
    this.places[i] = [i];
  }
}

Randomiser.prototype.randomise = function() {
  var charSet = 'ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz0123456789';
  var i = this.places.length;

  while (i--) {
    this.currentText[this.places[i]] = charSet.charAt((Math.random() * charSet.length) | 0);
  }
  this.iteration += 1;
}

Randomiser.prototype.setContent = function() {
  var t = this.currentText.join('');

  if (typeof this.element.textContent == 'string') {
    this.element.textContent = t;
  } else {
    this.element.innerText = t;
  }
}

Randomiser.prototype.run = function() {
  var n;
  var temp = [];

  // If first run, randomise to initiate
  if (!this.iteration) {
    this.randomise();
  }

  // If there are places left
  if (this.places.length) {

    // If reached count, randomly remove one place and set its character
    // to the original value
    if (!(this.iteration % this.count)) {
      n = this.places.splice((Math.random() * this.places.length|0), 1)[0];
      this.currentText[n] = this.originalText.charAt(n);
    }

    // Randomise the string and call itself
    this.randomise(); 
    this.setContent();
    var randomiser = this;
    setTimeout(function(){randomiser.run();}, this.delay); 
  }
  // If no places left, end
}

// Kick it off
var r = new Randomiser(document.getElementById('text'), 5, 200);
r.run();

The above uses classic prototype inheritance, it could use a closure for the same thing. Also all those prototype functions could be put in a single object that is assigned to Randomiser.prototype.

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