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public void deleteItem(int target) 
{
    int index = 0;
    CarNode item = head;

    while(item != null)
    {

        CarNode next = (item.node).node;
        CarNode previous = item;

        if (index == target)
        {

            previous.setNode(next);

        }

    item = element.node
    index++;

    }
}

Yeah, I don't know if I understood well, but I got told that you can use reference and don't have to directly refer to an object of the linked list in order to perform changes on the linked list.

A node contains the Car object and the node of another element of the LinkedList, right, so the reference is basically a clone that points to the same object as the original, but how come that the original is ignored and the reference takes precedence over the original when we modify the node of the reference? Sorry, it didn't make any sense to me and I've been scratching my head for hours over this.

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2  
I suggest you review what a reference is and rephrase your question. It is very hard to figure out what you're having trouble with. "the reference takes precedence over the original when we modify the node of the reference" doesn't seem to make much sense, even in the context of your code. Can you edit your post and rephrase the specific question? –  Jim Garrison Mar 31 '13 at 4:13
    
by reference i mean next and previous as opposed to item. –  user2089523 Mar 31 '13 at 4:16
    
Show us the definition of CarNode... and also, the line CarNode next = (item.node).node; seems to both contain an error (one of those nodes should be a next) and may also imply that the next pointer is in the data being stored in the list, and not in the listnode, which would be a design problem. –  Jim Garrison Mar 31 '13 at 4:22
    
private class CarNode { private Car car; private CarNode node; } –  user2089523 Mar 31 '13 at 4:27
    
do you want the entire class? because it only has your typical getters and setters. –  user2089523 Mar 31 '13 at 4:28

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The code should look like this:

public void deleteItem(int target) 
{
    int index = 0;
    CarNode item = head;
    CarNode prev = null;

    while(item != null)
    {
        if (index == target) {
            if (prev == null) {
                head = item.getNode();
                return; // We've removed the target.
            } else {
                prev.setNode(item.getNode());
                return; // We've removed the target.
            }
        }
        prev = item;
        item = item.getNode();
        index++;
    }
}

So let's break this down:

int index = 0;
CarNode item = head;
CarNode prev = null;

We need two variables: one to store the element we're looking at, the other to store the previous element (which we will use to reconnect the list once we remove an element). To start, our current is the head, and our previous doesn't exist. index will let us know when we reach the target.

while(item != null)

We want to iterate until we've hit the end of the list, marked by a null node.

if (index == target) {
    if (prev == null) {
        head = item.getNode();
        return; // We've removed the target.
    } else {
        prev.setNode(item.getNode());
        return; // We've removed the target.
    }
}

If we've found the target, we remove it. If previous is null, then the target was the head, so we move the head to the 2nd element. Otherwise, we make the previous node's reference to be the current node's reference, which cuts the current node out of the list. Once we remove the target, we are done, so we return.

prev = item;
item = item.getNode();
index++;

Update the previous and current nodes. Both are moved forward one node. Index is incremented.

How about an illustrated example:

Take a list of size 3. It looks like this:

1

We now call list.deleteItem(1); This instantiates a prev and a next node. next points to the first node, and prev is null.

2

Our target is 1, so we move to the next node. Now prev points to what next used to point to, and next points to the 2nd object in the list (the one we want to remove).

3

We remove it by setting the prev node's reference to be the next node's reference.

4

When we return from the method, java garbage collection does its job, and we're left with:

5

Tada! Node removed from the list!

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ahh i have difficulty parsing it, but what does return do exactly? –  user2089523 Mar 31 '13 at 4:59
    
prev.node = item.node; and previous.setNode(next); are equivalent, right? –  user2089523 Mar 31 '13 at 5:01
    
return ends the current method. And as for previous.setNode(next), that would actually be the right call, if node is not public. I'll edit that. Hold on. –  Jimmy Lee Mar 31 '13 at 5:03
public void deleteItem(int target) 
{
    int index = 0;
    CarNode item = head;

    CarNode next = null;
    CarNode previous = null;

    // stop when the linked-list ends
    while(item != null)
    {
        // the tail has no next node
        if (item.node != null)
            next = item.node.node;
        else
            next = null;

        // if targetIndex exist, remove it
        //     "logically" from the linekd-list
        if (index == target)
        {
            previous.setNode(next);
            break;
        }

        // today is tomorrow's yesterday
        previous = item;
        item = item.node;
        index++;

    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Ah thanks, so there were a few errors, but no major logic errors. buw why did you break;? –  user2089523 Mar 31 '13 at 4:57
    
check now @user2089523, I did break when we remove the target, since the target is associated with index\unique key, if it was associated with a value we can deal with multiple occurrences –  Khaled A Khunaifer Mar 31 '13 at 4:59
    
@user2089523 Khaled's use of break is the same as my use of return (for this case, at least): it just serves to exit the method when we're done. –  Jimmy Lee Mar 31 '13 at 5:11
    
@user2089523 Jimmy's use of return is okay, personally I suggest avoid using return to break from a loop, return in the middle of a function is like abort, using break instead should enhance maintainability if in the future the function is modified .. –  Khaled A Khunaifer Mar 31 '13 at 5:30
    
@user2089523 Alright. If you wanted to, you could substitute break in the places that I use return. It would do the same thing. Either way. –  Jimmy Lee Mar 31 '13 at 5:33

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