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I am implementing a user level thread library as an assignment. The memory allocation is done in the raw code itself. But it seems hard to understand what is happening in the code. Can anyone help me with an explanation.

void * malloc_stack() 
{
  /* allocate something aligned at 16
   */
   void *ptr = malloc(STACK_SIZE + 16);
   if (!ptr) return NULL;
   ptr = (void *)(((int)ptr & (-1 << 4)) + 0x10);
   return ptr;
}

Edit: Because the stack grows downwards, what is the address assigned to ptr? Is it the base of the stack or the top of the stack?

Assuming that the base is in a higher memory address and the top is at a lower memory address(because of growing downwards)

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closed as not a real question by H2CO3, luser droog, Anthon, femtoRgon, Raghunandan Mar 31 '13 at 19:21

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
A little context would not go a miss – Ed Heal Mar 31 '13 at 5:18
    
Do you mean the address of where ptr is stored or the value at the address where ptr is stored (meaning the address that ptr is pointing to)? – DanZimm Mar 31 '13 at 5:23
1  
@luserdroog: What? Most CPU hardware stacks (used by software to implement the call stack) grow downward. As an example, the x86 PUSH instruction decreases SP. – Ben Voigt Mar 31 '13 at 5:54
1  
BTW, this code is really bad and not portable. On many architectures int and void* don't have the same width. (uintptr_t)ptr & (UINTPTR_MAX << 4) should be used for the inner part. – Jens Gustedt Mar 31 '13 at 7:58
1  
I disagree with the votes to close this question. It is a teaching opportunity, obviously by all the activity it has garnered. I voted to leave open. Needs more activity. – Joe Frambach Mar 31 '13 at 18:24
up vote -1 down vote accepted

So if I understand the question correctly, you want help understanding this code

I'm going to assume you understand the first two lines of the function and the last one as well, so that only leaves

ptr = (void *)(((int)ptr & (-1 << 4)) + 0x10);

First we should look at (-1 << 4). Since you cast ptr I believe it is safe to assume that -1 will be considered an int as well and will become the value 0xFFFFFFFF (this would be assuming that your system's int has 4 bytes or 32 bits which I believe is a pretty universal thing nowadays. Next, since there's a shift we should look at the binary representation of this so -1 = 0xFFFFFFFF = 0b11111111111111111111111111111111 so shifting by 4... (-1 << 4) = 0b11111111111111111111111111110000 = 0xFFFFFFF0.

Next ptr is being anded to this value meaning that ptr will be forced to have end in 0000. Notice that when converting any sort of number with this format, it will be divisible by 16, thus aligning the ptr to 16. It then adds 0x10 to force the address to be inside the allocated region.

Hope this helps!

Edit: Because the stack grows downwards, what is the address assigned to ptr? Is it the base of the stack or the top of the stack?

Assuming that the base is in a higher memory address and the top is at a lower memory address(because of growing downwards)

As the guy in the comments pointed out: this behavior is very much so undefined. If this is for homework, as I suspect it is, I suggest you verify that this is the behavior of your machine (and likely the machine whoever is grading it is on). Otherwise to fix it you could simply replace -1 with 0xFFFFFFFF and then I believe the issue should become resolved (again I'm not consulting the c standard this is simply from an empirical perspective). Do note that in replacing -1 with 0xFFFFFFFFu what I explained should still make sense.

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In which world do we live in where an accepted answer has no references to back it up? It is not universal for an int to have 4 bytes or 32 bits. Left shifting negative values is undefined behaviour, regardless of what DanZimm would have us believe. – Seb Mar 31 '13 at 6:05
    
So first off I said 'i believe is a pretty universal thing' I did NOT claim it is, if whoever reads this as well believes that blindly then that would be their issue, it tends to be specific to what machine you're running on and your compiler etc. Next issue, I'm not sure what world you live in, but in my world -1 is the equivalent to 0xffffffff or the equivalent for different data type sizes. I BELIEVE its standard for machines nowadays to all shift the same - if you're trying to claim the the C compiler won't use the machine's shl instr then I'm not exactly sure what to say.... – DanZimm Mar 31 '13 at 6:42
    
Ahh, ok. You believe that C was designed to be compiled only on your architecture, or you don't care about other architectures. I won't mention other architectures again, though I do believe it's important for the OP to be aware that you don't care about other architectures. Which machine instruction will the cint and ch compilers use? – Seb Mar 31 '13 at 7:24
    
Again, I said I believe it's standard, I never asserted ANYWHERE that 'this is how computers work'. I simply made some assumptions in order to try and help the OP out. All in all I qualify everything I say and NEVER dismiss the possibility of me being wrong or anything of the such. As for your comment on cint, surely cint acts differently, also surely I doubt the OP is using cint. I'm not exactly too sure why you began attacking my assumptions, but I qualify them all implying that NONE of them are COMPLETELY correct - note that although I have done all this I believe I have helped the OP – DanZimm Mar 31 '13 at 7:34
1  
Perhaps 0xFFFFFFFFu – Ben Voigt Apr 9 '13 at 18:29

This looks like an implementation of aligned_malloc, which is useful when you have a processor (or coprocessor, or DMA-capable device) where some or all instructions (operations) can only work on aligned memory. In addition to instructions which outright fail on unaligned memory, alignment may impact atomicity.

It has nothing to do with the stack. By its nature, dynamic allocation cannot come from the stack, because allocations on the stack do not survive return to the calling function, but dynamic allocations must survive until the matching deallocation call.

(Put another way: A stack is, by definition Last-In-First-Out. Dynamic allocation is not LIFO, but can accommodate arbitrary ordering of lifetimes.)

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Look closer; It looks more like undefined behaviour, to me. All memory is aligned, though not all memory is aligned suitably for {insert specific purpose}. Dynamic allocation can come from where-ever the implementation chooses. A value can be removed from the beginning or middle of a stack with something like void *current; do { current = pop(stack); push(temp_stack, current); } while (current != value); pop(temp_stack); for (current = pop(temp_stack); current != NULL; current = pop(temp_stack)) { push(stack, current); } ... and added in a similar way. – Seb Mar 31 '13 at 6:50
    
@modifiablelvalue: Implementations of library functions such as aligned_malloc frequently rely on non-portable behavior. A different platform comes with a different library. I'm not sure how the rest of your comment is relevant -- dynamic memory is not allowed to work like that because you're changing the address of other objects! – Ben Voigt Mar 31 '13 at 12:13
    
This logic should extend on to explain why it's wrong to write code like this in C, but it goes in the wrong direction. If I didn't know better, I'd think you are an expert at OS internals. Alas! You don't know how paging works. OSes change the physical address of data all the time, move your data out of RAM and onto secondary storage. For this reason, things like aligned_malloc are meant to be implemented by the OS, which ensures that the correct alignment is kept regardless of physical address change. – Seb Apr 1 '13 at 5:29
    
Why can paging change the physical address of an object, while a stack-based underlying dynamic allocation algorithm can't? – Seb Apr 1 '13 at 5:40
    
@modifiablelvalue: The virtual address, which is what is stored in pointers potentially scattered everywhere, including encrypted pointers, doesn't change, and virtual and physical addresses have the same alignment (up to the page size, which is typically several kilobytes, much coarser than any alignment you'd care about). Physical addresses just aren't important for this discussion. – Ben Voigt Apr 1 '13 at 7:02

I am implementing a user level thread library as an assignment. The memory allocation is done in the raw code itself. But it seems hard to understand what is happening in the code. Can anyone help me with an explanation.

Sure. The C standard says: The result of E1 << E2 is E1 left-shifted E2 bit positions; vacated bits are filled with zeros. If E1 has an unsigned type, {irrelevant omission}. If E1 has a signed type and nonnegative value, and E1 × 2E2 is representable in the result type, then that is the resulting value; otherwise, the behavior is undefined.

Thus, -1 << 4 is undefined behaviour. Here's the C standard's explanation of undefined behaviour: behavior, upon use of a nonportable or erroneous program construct or of erroneous data, for which this International Standard imposes no requirements

Thus, there are no requirements of this code. It can do anything and everything, or nothing at all, and it needs no justification or logic to do so. It could rely on a faery dust sensor to operate correctly, for all we know...

Edit: Because the stack grows downwards, what is the address assigned to ptr? ...

What stack? That's not an address because it isn't guaranteed to point to an object; Treating it as though it is, is also undefined behaviour: if an lvalue does not designate an object when it is evaluated, the behavior is undefined.

Next question:

... Is it the base of the stack or the top of the stack?

It could be either, neither, anything or everything (including highly contagious faery cancer dust). Undefined behaviour...

Assuming that the base is in a higher memory address and the top is at a lower memory address(because of growing downwards)

... would be silly. Undefined behaviour...

This code may appear to function correctly on your system, with your configuration, but given a different OS, hardware, C standard library or compiler might malfunction. C wasn't designed to be compatible solely with your system, but with a large variety of systems; C code shouldn't be written like this! C was designed so that programs could be written portably or independently of OS, hardware, C standard library and compiler implementations! Which book are you reading?

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