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In a database, I have a username table and I have jurisdiction table. I also have a intermediate table to assign a user to one or more jurisdictions.

employee table

  • userID (primary Key)
  • firstName
  • lastName

records:

+--------+-----------+----------+
| userID | firstName | lastName |
+--------+-----------+----------+
|      6 | John      | Doe      |
|     11 | lisa      | lopez    | 
+--------+-----------+----------+

jurisdictions table

  • jurId (Primary Key)
  • region

records:

+-------+--------------+
| jurID | jurisdiction |
+-------+--------------+
|     1 | California   |
|     2 | Texas        |
|     3 | Washington   |
|     4 | South Dakota |
|     5 | Alaska       |
|     6 | Ohio         |
+-------+--------------+

user_jurisdiction

  • userID (Foriegn Key pointing to employees userID)
  • jurID (Foriegn Key pointing to jurisdictions jurID)

records:

    +--------+-------+
    | userID | jurID |
    +--------+-------+
    |      6 |     2 |
    |      6 |     3 |
    |     11 |     2 |
    +--------+-------+

I've been trying for hours to come up with a sql statement that would select/list all the workers from "Texas". I've been using many altercations of this sql statement but no success:

SELECT  jurisdictions.jurisdiction,
        employees.firstName
FROM    jurisdictions,
        employees
        INNER JOIN user_jurisdictions
            ON  user_jurisdictions.jurID = jurisdictions.jurID AND 
                user_jurisdictions.userID = employees.userID
WHERE   jurisdictions.jurisdiction = "Texas";

But I have had no success. What sql statement would get a list of employees that are involved from jurisdictions.jurisdiction = "Texas";

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

What you are doing right now is you are producing catersian product from tables: employees and jurisdictions. The proper syntax of joins is to explicit define the type of join between two tables.

SELECT  a.*, c.*
FROM    employees a
        INNER JOIN user_jurisdiction b
            ON a.userID = b.userID
        INNER JOIN jurisdictions c
            ON b.jurID = c.jurID
WHERE   c.jurisdiction = 'Texas'

OUTPUT of the current query

╔════════╦═══════════╦══════════╦═══════╦══════════════╗
║ USERID ║ FIRSTNAME ║ LASTNAME ║ JURID ║ JURISDICTION ║
╠════════╬═══════════╬══════════╬═══════╬══════════════╣
║      6 ║ John      ║ Doe      ║     2 ║ Texas        ║
║     11 ║ lisa      ║ lopez    ║     2 ║ Texas        ║
╚════════╩═══════════╩══════════╩═══════╩══════════════╝

To further gain more knowledge about joins, kindly visit the link below:

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Thanks. Is "employees a" the same as "employees AS a"? –  dman Mar 31 '13 at 7:56
1  
@dhee yes. the AS keyword is optional. –  John Woo Mar 31 '13 at 7:57
    
Would my intermediate table benefit from a primary key even thought I am not using/need a primary key for it? –  dman Mar 31 '13 at 10:09
1  
no, jurisdictions.jurisdiction. Here's an example, ALTER TABLE jurisdictions ADD INDEX (jurisdiction) –  John Woo Mar 31 '13 at 10:43
1  
I think this is better than using SQL-86 standard (like the other answer has demonstrated) because it is prone to having cartesian result if you forget to add the joining condition on where clause. –  John Woo Mar 31 '13 at 10:47
SELECT 
 e.*
FROM 
 jurisdictions j, user_jurisdiction uj, employees e
WHERE
 uj.jurID = j.jurID AND 
 uj.userID = e.userID AND
 j.jurisdiction = 'Texas';
share|improve this answer
    
How come this statement works without a inner join? –  dman Mar 31 '13 at 10:38
    
It's an explicit join, equivalent to INNER JOIN syntax –  Miguel Prz Mar 31 '13 at 18:45

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