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I am trying to write a simple recursion program that will print out the canonical sum of all of the integers preceding the input and the input itself. For example, entering 5 should print out "1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 5". The input must be greater than zero. A bump in the right direction would be appreciated.

import java.util.Scanner;

public class Quiz10 
{
    public static void main (String[] args)
    {
        int input;
        System.out.println("Please enter an integer greater than one: ");
        Scanner scan = new Scanner(System.in);
        input = scan.nextInt();
        sumReverse(input);
    }
    public static void sumReverse(int n)
    {
        int x = n;

        if(x == 1)
            System.out.print(x);
        else if(x > 0)
        {
            System.out.print(x + " + " + (x-1));
        }
        x--;
        sumReverse(x);
    }
}

Edit: with an input of 5 I am currently getting: "5 + 44 + 33 + 22 + 11Exception in thread "main" java.lang.StackOverflowError..."

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I'm assuming you're using '5' as input, yes? What output are you getting? –  Refugnic Eternium Mar 31 '13 at 8:31
    
With an input of 5 I get "5 + 44 + 33 + 22 + 11Exception in thread "main" java.lang.StackOverflowError" –  Johnny Mar 31 '13 at 8:33
    
Your recursive call is inconditional and that leads to a loop. –  PeterMmm Mar 31 '13 at 8:33
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8 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You need to recurse only in the good case. Here you recurse everytime so you get an infinite loop.

    else if(x > 0)
    {
        System.out.print(x + " + ");
        x--;
        sumReverse(x);
    }

Notice I also deleted the + (x - 1) as it will be printed in the next recursion.

share|improve this answer
    
Quick answer that straightened me right out. –  Johnny Mar 31 '13 at 8:38
    
By the way, is recursion a requirement? If not, a simple for (int x = n; x > 0; x--) would do the trick in a cleaner way –  Steph Mar 31 '13 at 8:47
    
Yeah, recursion was a requirement or I would have just used a loop. –  Johnny Mar 31 '13 at 8:53
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You're missing the termination condition. Try this:

public static void sumReverse(int n)
{
    if(n == 1) {
        System.out.print(n);
        return;
    }
    else if(n > 0)
    {
        System.out.print(n + " + " + (n-1));
    } else return;
    sumReverse(--n);
}

This function will stop once n hits 1 or if 1 is lower or equal than zero.

An alternative would be:

public static void sumReverse(int n)
{
    if(n == 1) System.out.print(n);
    else if(n > 0)
    {
        System.out.print(n + " + " + (n-1));
        sumReverse(--n);
    }        
}

This has the same effect.

share|improve this answer
    
Is the return necessary? –  Johnny Mar 31 '13 at 8:37
    
No, see the second function for an alternative. Also, you may want to remove the (n - 1), because it will lead to the 5 + 44 effect. –  Refugnic Eternium Mar 31 '13 at 8:38
    
Yes, I guess that's the whole point of recursion, huh? :) –  Johnny Mar 31 '13 at 8:41
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public class Main {

    public static String s = "";

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        int input;
        System.out.println("Please enter an integer greater than one: ");
        Scanner scan = new Scanner(System.in);
        input = scan.nextInt();
        String b=sumReverse(input);
        System.out.println(b);
    }

    public static String sumReverse(int n) {
        int x = n;

         if (x == 1) {
          s = "1" + s;
          return s;
        } else if (x > 0) {
           s ="+"+  Integer.toString(x) +s ;
           sumReverse(x - 1);
    }
        return s;

    }
}

The Output:

Please enter an integer greater than one: 
10 
1+2+3+4+5+6+7+8+9+10
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As you don't accumulate the sum, you can't compute it. The best would be to return it : to define a function summing until n and call it recursively.

I'll give it to you in pseudo-code as I understand you'd prefer to learn rather than to have your work done :

function sum(int n) -> int {
     if x==1 : return 1
     else : return n + sum(n-1)
}

Then you would print sum(n).

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public static void sumReverse(int n){
    if(n==0)
        return;

    if(n == 1){
        System.out.print(n);
    }else if(n > 0)
    {
        System.out.print(n + " + ");
        sumReverse(n-1);
    }

}
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add comment
  • You are not stopping the recursion.
  • You should add return after the recursion stop condition.
  • Another thing, remove the + (n-1) from the print in the else and you should be fine.
  • Plus, it's redundant to assign n to x. You can work directly on n.

Try to draw the recursion calls on paper and you'll better understand how it works.

public static void sumReverse(int n)
{
     if(n == 1) {
         System.out.print(n);
         return;
     }
     else if(n > 0)
     {
         System.out.print(n + " + ");
     }
     sumReverse(n-1);
}
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Would like to point out a few things: 1. This problem is not a usual candidate for recursion. 2. Your best bet if you intend to use recursion is to hold the return values as String and print finally in your main method as below. 3. Declaring a new variable x is really unnecessary.

public static void main (String[] args)
    {
        int input;
        System.out.println("Please enter an integer greater than one: ");
        Scanner scan = new Scanner(System.in);
        input = scan.nextInt();
        System.out.println(sumReverse(input));
    }
    public static String sumReverse(int n)
    {
        String a = "";
        if(n > 1)
        {
            return (n + "+" + sumReverse(n-1));
        }
        return "1";
    }
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public static void sum(int n){
  sumReverse(n-1);
  System.out.print(n);
}

public static int sumReverse(int n){
  if(n==1){
    return n;
  }
  System.out.print(sumReverse(n-1)+"+");
  return n;
}
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