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For a method of Graphics class :fillOval, what does x and y denote ? The documentation says :

x - the x coordinate of the upper left corner of the oval to be filled.
y - the y coordinate of the upper left corner of the oval to be filled.

I do not understand this. What does it mean ?

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2 Answers 2

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x - the x coordinate of the upper left corner of the oval to be filled.
y - the y coordinate of the upper left corner of the oval to be filled.

See the image:

enter image description here

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On a piece of paper, draw a rectangle. Then draw an oval inside the rectangle, filling up the rectangle as much as possible (the oval should touch all 4 sides of the rectangle once).

The top-left corner of the square is (x,y)

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In this picture,all the 9 buttons have been drawn while keeping the x,y as (0,0). What does that mean? –  saplingPro Mar 31 '13 at 9:54
    
@saplingPro Perhaps there was a transformation between drawing the circles? If they were truly draw at the same coordinates, then there would only appear to be one circle. –  user166390 Mar 31 '13 at 9:56
    
Perhaps there was a transformation between drawing the circles..I didn't understand this –  saplingPro Mar 31 '13 at 9:56
    
@saplingPro I added a link. If there are still questions of how all the buttons can be drawn at the "same coordinates" (i.e. (0,0)), add a link showing the code that renders it like this to the main question and add this (sub) question to the main question as well - I suspect that a transformation is being applied. –  user166390 Mar 31 '13 at 9:58
    
Let me tell you , I first used IDE to place buttons,then those buttons shape was changed as JButton b = new RoundButton(). The roundbutton class has all the code that makes the button..So is this what you call transformation ? –  saplingPro Mar 31 '13 at 10:00

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