Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Assume we have a function that returns one million integer vectors of length 30 each with smallish entries (between -100 and 100, say). Assume further that the output has only about 30000 unique vectors, the rest being duplicates. What is a good data structure and algorithm to retrieve the list of unique output vectors? Preferably the solution should scale well when the proportion of 3% unique vectors is roughly constant.

This question is mostly about the data structure, but I'm planning to implement this in C++ using the STL, so any hints on the implementation are welcome too.

  • The naive algorithm is to store the list of known vectors (potentially sorted lexicographically). When a new vector arrives we can check if it is already in the list using a loop (or search in a sorted list).
  • Hashing: Let's assume the vectors are stored in C-arrays. What is a good hash function for integer vectors? A drawback I see is that every component of every vector is touched at least once. This seems too much already.
  • Would any tree data structure be good? For instance we could store the value in the first component of all seen vectors as roots and then the value in the second component as their children, ...

I don't have a computer science background. I would also be greatful for pointers to literature where I could learn how to approach such problems in general.

share|improve this question
1  
Are those complete duplicates meaning that even the order within the duplicate vectors is the same? Are those vectors all of the length of 30? –  Alexey Frunze Mar 31 '13 at 10:06
    
@AlexeyFrunze I don't fully understand; what's the order of a vector? –  G. Bach Mar 31 '13 at 10:16
    
@G.Bach Not of, within. The order of numbers in vectors deemed duplicate. –  Alexey Frunze Mar 31 '13 at 10:18
    
@AlexeyFrunze Yes, they are 'complete duplicates' in your terminology and they are all of the same length. For example (-1,2,3) is not a duplicate of (-1,3,2) and both must be kept. –  Thomas Mar 31 '13 at 10:18
    
Hashing lets you decide the memory vs. speed trade-off, which is good. I do not think you can avoid "touching each element at least once". –  brian beuning Mar 31 '13 at 11:51

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

What you're proposing is sometimes called a look-aside table; a secondary table used for various lookup purposes. In your case, you have a number of different possible ways of organizing this table. The most obvious is to not organize it, and use linear search to see if the next element is already known. Since the table will end up containing some 30000 elements, that's probably not a good idea. From the standard library (at least in C++11), there are two possibilities: std::set and std::unordered_set. std::set uses some form of balanced tree, so makes at most lg n comparisions for each lookup (around 15 for 30000 elements); std::unordered_set is a hash table, and with a good hash function, will require as small constant number of comparisons: you should be able to get it down to under 2 on the average (but possibly at a cost of more memory—the lower the load factor, the less the probability of a collision). As you mention, you do have the extra cost of calculating the hash function, and as you point out, this does involve visiting each element in the vector; in the binary tree, all that it required in each comparison is that enough elements are compared to determine order—in many cases, that may be just one or two. (But if you say that there are a lot of duplicates... you cannot detect a duplicate until you've visited all 30 entries, since any one may vary.) The only way to know which solution will actually be faster is to measure both, using typical data; for a data set such as you describe (many duplicates), I suspect the hash table will win, but it's far from certain.

Finally, you can use some sort of non-binary tree. If you can really limit the values to a specific range (e.g. -100..100), you can use an ordinary vector or array with pointers to the subnodes, indexing directly with the element value, transposed as necessary. You then just walk the tree until either you find a null pointer, or you reach the end. The maximum depth of the tree will be 30, and in fact, every element will be 30 deep, but typically, you'll find that the element is unique before getting that deep. I suspect (but again, you'ld need to measure) that in your case, with many duplicates, this will in fact be significantly slower than the previous two suggestions. (And it would be a lot more work on your part, because I'm not aware of any existing implementations.)

As for hashing, just about any form of linear congruent hashing should be sufficient: FNV, for example. Most of the documentation for such hashes concerns strings (arrays of char), but they tend to work just as well with any integral type. I've generally used something like:

template <typename ForwardIterator>
size_t
hash( ForwardIterator begin, ForwardIterator end )
{
    size_t results = 2166136261U 
    for ( ForwardIterator current = begin; current != end; ++ current ) {
        results = 127 * results + static_cast<size_t>( *current );
    }
    return results;
}

My choice of 127 as a multiplier is largely based on speed in older systems: multiplying by 127 is a lot faster than most of the other values which give good results. (I have no idea whether this is still true. But multiplication is still a relatively slow operation on many machines, and the compiler will convert 127 * x into something like x << 7 - x if that is faster.) The distribution with the above algorithm is about as good as that for FNV, at least with the data sets I've tested.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer. I played around with this a bit, and the hash table is a lot slower than I expected. The computation of the hash function is about 3 times more expansive than 30 comparisons which are the worst case look-up in a trie. Also the std::unordered_map does several 30-loop comparisons when searching in a bucket. I guess the second problem can be rectified by optimizing bucket number etc. So far the trie turned out to be a lot faster. –  Thomas Mar 31 '13 at 20:01
    
OK, I got it working fast with stl::unordered_set now. I made some implementation errors. Thanks again. –  Thomas Mar 31 '13 at 21:59

A radix map would be ideal, but you would need to implement it as there is not an implementation in the std library.

share|improve this answer
    
Would it be ideal? In his case, it means a depth of 30, where as for 30000 distinct values, a balanced B-tree would have a depth of about 15. (Of course, the comparison is cheaper: you are guaranteed that you only look at one element per level, where as in the B-tree, it's certain that you'll sometimes have to look at more than one. Still, the number of elements you have to look at is probably not that significant, since after the first, all of the rest are in cache.) –  James Kanze Mar 31 '13 at 11:07

Calculate a CRC representation of the values in the first vector. You now have one number which represents your 30 values. That number is likely to be unique with respect to the rest of the vectors but it is not guarenteed.

Take the CRC value as the key, and a pointer to the actual vector and insert it into a multimap {CRC, VectorPointer}.

Now for each remaining vector calculate the CRC, and look that up in the multimap.

If you don't find it, insert the {CRC, VectorPointer}. If you do find it, iterate though the matches and compare the data elements to decide if it is identical. If it is discard the new vector. If it is not, then insert the {CRC, VectorPointer}.

Rinse and Repeat until all 30,000 vectors have been processed.

You have your unique set iteratable in the multimap.

share|improve this answer
    
This is basically hashing with a tree. You get similar results by using a hash container that stores the full hash value in each bucket and comparing the full hash value before comparing the keys. –  brian beuning Mar 31 '13 at 11:54
    
@brianbeuning There is one difference between calculating the CRC and calculating a hash code---it's a lot more expensive to calculate the CRC. –  James Kanze Mar 31 '13 at 23:48

Let's say that you have N vectors of length K, and there are only M unique of them.

  • Hashing + hashmap

You can calculate the hash of every vector in O(K) time, check whether you already have such a vector in your hashmap and inserting new vector in O(1) time both. For hash function you can simply use polinomial hash without modulus, just storing hashes in 64-bit type and ignoring overflows. Implementation is very simple and it will work in O(N*K) time requiring O(M*K) memory. If you need to sort the elements first, the time will be O(N*K*log(K))

  • Radix tree

I think you should not use radix tree here because you will still need to look through each element of each vector. That is so because if you don't have such a vector in a tree you'll need to insert all of its elements, and if you have such a vector you'll need to go down to the leaf of the tree to see that you have really inserted such a vector before. So the asymptotiсs remain the same, but you'll need to implement the tree by yourself and it is not a very good idea :)


Looks like it is easy to show that you need at least to read all the elements of vectors. That is so because in every moment you have two possibilities - you have found current vector before and you need to read all its elements to the end to identify it, or you haven't found current vector before and you need to read all its elements to sort and save them. Yet if vectors were already sorted, you will need to read elements only to the first mismatch. But lets imagine that first 30000 vectors were unique, then you'll need to read all others vectors to the end to determine that they are not unique, no matter what algorithm or data structure you'll use. And finally we get that you need to read almost all the vectors to the end :)

If your values are really in range (-100, 100) and there are only 30 values in vector, you can notice that such vector can be saved in four 64-bit integers because you have only 8*30 = 240 bits of data in it. But it is just another idea to play with, and I don't think that any implementation using it will work faster than hashing + hashmap.

share|improve this answer
    
I agree that most of the time I will have to do 30 comparisons to find that the vector was already there. However, computing the hash function takes a lot longer than 30 comparisons. In my experiments the trie is by far the fastest. –  Thomas Mar 31 '13 at 20:05
    
Wow. Hashing requires one addition and one multiplication per symbol. When working with the trie requires some work with pointers, unless you implement your trie with the array. So you say that one addition and one multiplication is faster than getting something from the memory? –  Mikhail Melnik Apr 5 '13 at 17:23

Hashing: ... A drawback I see is that every component of every vector is touched at least once. This seems too much already.

In the worst case, how else can you compare two vectors without looking at both at least once? No, really, if you have 1,1,1 and 2,2,2 the comparison/matching ends immediately. But if you have 1,2,3 and 1,2,3?

Anyway, here's one way you could solve your problem. The implementation can be definitely improved.

#include <iostream>
#include <map>
#include <vector>
#include <list>
#include <cstdint>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <ctime>

using namespace std;

const int TotalVectorCount = 1000000;
const int UniqueVectorCount = 30000;
const int VectorLength = 30;

typedef vector<int> Vector;

typedef unsigned long long uint64;

void GenerateRandomVector(Vector& v)
{
  v.reserve(VectorLength);
  // generate 30 values from -100 to +100
  for (int i = 0; i < VectorLength; i++)
    v.push_back(rand() % 201 - 100);
}

bool IdenticalVectors(const Vector& v1, const Vector& v2)
{
  for (int i = 0; i < VectorLength; i++)
    if (v1[i] != v2[i])
      return false;

  return true;
}

// this lets us do "cout << Vector"
ostream& operator<<(ostream& os, const Vector& v)
{
  for (int i = 0; i < VectorLength; i++)
    os << v[i] << ' ';

  return os;
}

uint64 HashVector(const Vector& v)
{
  // this is probably a bad hash function,
  // but it seems to work nonetheless
  uint64 h = 0x7FFFFFFFFFFFFFE7;
  for (int i = 0; i < VectorLength; i++)
    h = h * 0xFFFFFFFFFFFFFFC5 + v[i];
  return h & 0xFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF;
}

Vector UniqueTestVectors[UniqueVectorCount];

void GenerateUniqueTestVectors()
{
  map<uint64,char> m;
  for (int i = 0; i < UniqueVectorCount; i++)
  {
    for (;;)
    {
      GenerateRandomVector(UniqueTestVectors[i]);
      uint64 h = HashVector(UniqueTestVectors[i]);

      map<uint64,char>::iterator it = m.find(h);

      if (it == m.end())
      {
        m[h] = 0;
        break;
      }
    }
  }
}

bool GetNextVector(Vector& v)
{
  static int count = 0;
  v = UniqueTestVectors[count % UniqueVectorCount];
  return ++count <= TotalVectorCount;
}

int main()
{
  srand(time(0));

  cout << "Generating " << UniqueVectorCount << " unique random vectors..."
       << endl;
  GenerateUniqueTestVectors();

#if 0
  for (int i = 0; i < UniqueVectorCount; i++)
    cout << UniqueTestVectors[i] << endl;
#endif

  cout << "Generating " << TotalVectorCount << " random vectors with only "
       << UniqueVectorCount << " unique..." << endl;

  map<uint64,list<Vector>> TheBigHashTable;

  int uniqCnt = 0;
  int totCnt = 0;

  Vector v;
  while (GetNextVector(v))
  {
    totCnt++;

    uint64 h = HashVector(v);

    map<uint64,list<Vector>>::iterator it = TheBigHashTable.find(h);

    if (it == TheBigHashTable.end())
    {
      // seeing vector with this hash (h) for the first time,
      // insert it into the hash table
      list<Vector> l;
      l.push_back(v);

      TheBigHashTable[h] = l;
      uniqCnt++;
    }
    else
    {
      // we've seen vectors with this hash (h) before,
      // let's see if we've already hashed this vector
      list<Vector>::iterator it;
      bool exists = false;

      for (it = TheBigHashTable[h].begin();
           it != TheBigHashTable[h].end();
           it++)
      {
        if (IdenticalVectors(*it, v))
        {
          // we've hashed this vector before
          exists = true;
          break;
        }
      }

      if (!exists)
      {
        // we haven't hashed this vector before,
        // let's do it now
        TheBigHashTable[h].push_back(v);
        uniqCnt++;
      }
    }
  }

#if 0
  cout << "Unique vectors found:" << endl;
  map<uint64,list<Vector>>::iterator it;
  for (it = TheBigHashTable.begin();
       it != TheBigHashTable.end();
       it++)
  {
    list<Vector>::iterator it2;
    for (it2 = it->second.begin();
         it2 != it->second.end();
         it2++)
      cout << *it2 << endl;
  }
#endif

  cout << "Hashed " << uniqCnt << " unique vectors out of " << totCnt << " total" << endl;

  return 0;
}

Output (ideone) in 1.12 seconds with 12848 kB RAM used:

Generating 30000 unique random vectors...
Generating 1000000 random vectors with only 30000 unique...
Hashed 30000 unique vectors out of 1000000 total

Now, the same with fewer and shorter unique vectors, so they can be printed in the console:

Output (ideone) in 0.14 seconds with 3040 kB of RAM used:

Generating 10 unique random vectors...
-45 75 1 -71 -83 97 10 -18 89 -10 
-11 60 18 -54 -90 77 19 -90 -7 -31 
-15 -65 -47 88 25 -56 4 39 -20 39 
-64 -14 -37 -13 15 -70 -66 -75 12 73 
-35 -99 32 83 98 -8 59 16 2 -98 
86 37 -63 -62 24 62 -68 78 -50 -38 
17 -64 48 80 -26 -87 61 8 -62 -28 
-70 -47 -27 62 86 -29 -97 44 37 -45 
-4 -28 92 -17 -40 -35 -56 -58 -57 -55 
5 10 -19 -48 -61 5 -35 100 -88 -47 
Generating 1000000 random vectors with only 10 unique...
Unique vectors found:
86 37 -63 -62 24 62 -68 78 -50 -38 
17 -64 48 80 -26 -87 61 8 -62 -28 
5 10 -19 -48 -61 5 -35 100 -88 -47 
-4 -28 92 -17 -40 -35 -56 -58 -57 -55 
-11 60 18 -54 -90 77 19 -90 -7 -31 
-15 -65 -47 88 25 -56 4 39 -20 39 
-35 -99 32 83 98 -8 59 16 2 -98 
-45 75 1 -71 -83 97 10 -18 89 -10 
-64 -14 -37 -13 15 -70 -66 -75 12 73 
-70 -47 -27 62 86 -29 -97 44 37 -45 
Hashed 10 unique vectors out of 1000000 total
share|improve this answer
    
I agree that most of the time I will have to do 30 comparisons to find that the vector was already there. However, computing the hash function takes a lot longer than 30 comparisons. Also your implementation stores the hash-values in a map which gives back the logarithmic search time in the length of the list... –  Thomas Mar 31 '13 at 20:06
    
Maps-sorted-trees can be changed to maps-hash-tables in mere seconds, just rename map to unordered_map. The run time visually improves. –  Alexey Frunze Mar 31 '13 at 22:50

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.