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I am trying to implement wild cards in Java.

Here is the code I have :

public class Assign {

public boolean compare(String s1, String s2)
{
    char [] s3 = s1.toCharArray();
    char [] s4 = s2.toCharArray();
    int i,j;

    int k = 0;
    for(i=0;i<s3.length;i++)
    {
        for(j=0;j<s4.length;j++)
        {
            if(s3[i] == s4[j])
            {

                if(s4[j] == '*')
                {
                    i++;

                    if(s3[i] == s4[s4.length-1])
                    {
                        return true;
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }
    return false;
}
public static void main(String args[])
{
    Assign a = new Assign();
    boolean r = a.compare("a hello b", "a * b");
    System.out.println(r);
}
}

There will be two parameters to be passed to the function. One is a string and the other one is a regular expression.

Example cases are:

1) If string passed is "a hello b" and the regular expression is "a * b" then the function should return TRUE because in the place of * any number of characters can exist.

2) If string passed is "a X b" and the regular expression is "a ? b" then the return value should be TRUE because if there is a ? in regular expression then there should be only one character between a and b.

Like this it shall work for all cases. I think the logic I thought is fine but I ma having a trouble in the coding part.

I dont want to import Pattern and Matcher. Without them I have to complete this.

Kindly, anyone help me on this by specifying the correct code.

Thanking you

share|improve this question
    
You can call it something else, but regex is not defined like you have defined it. –  Pescis Mar 31 '13 at 10:27
    
Why don't you just take out the sub string between 'a' and 'b' and check. –  joey rohan Mar 31 '13 at 10:30
    
the specification you've provided is not very thorough. is this system strictly delimited by spaces? what exactly should happen if the match string is something like ???a??hello*!whatever? do the same rules apply? if your match strings will be as simple as your examples, you can split the strings by the space character and do some basic checks with a loop perhaps –  Alex Lynch Mar 31 '13 at 10:31

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Assuming that the regex will only contain either * or ? at any instance of time

I have written a simple program using substring() & indexOf(), which tires to evaluate the regex against the string to compare.

package problems;

public class WildCardCompare {

    public boolean compare(String str, String regex) {
        if(regex == null || str == null) {
            return false;
        }
        if(regex.equals("*")) {
            return true;
        }
        if(regex.equals("?") && str.length() == 1) {
            return true;
        }
        if(!regex.contains("*") && !regex.contains("?")) {
            return str.equals(regex);
        }

        String token = null;
        if(regex.contains("*")) {
            token = "*";
        }

        if(regex.contains("?")) {
            token = "?";
        }

        if(token != null) {
            //String before *, if any...
            String before = regex.substring(0, regex.indexOf(token));
            //String after *, if any...
            String after = regex.substring(regex.indexOf(token)+1, regex.length());

            boolean bmatches = true;
            if(before != null && before.length() != 0) {
                if(str.indexOf(before) == 0) {
                    bmatches = true;
                }
                else {
                    bmatches = false;
                }
            }
            boolean amatches = true;
            if(after != null && after.length() != 0) {
                if(str.indexOf(after) == (str.length() - after.length())) {
                    amatches = true;
                }
                else {
                    amatches = false;
                }
            }
            return bmatches && amatches;
        }

        return false;
    }

    public static void main(String args[])
    {
        boolean r;
        WildCardCompare compare = new WildCardCompare();
        r = compare.compare("a b hello", "a b *");
        System.out.println(r);
        r = compare.compare("a hello b", "a * b");
        System.out.println(r);
        r = compare.compare("a hello b", "aaaa*bbbb");
        System.out.println(r);
        r = compare.compare( "aaaaTbbbb", "aaaa*bbbb");
        System.out.println(r);
        r = compare.compare( "aT", "a?");
        System.out.println(r);
        r = compare.compare("AT",  "a?");
        System.out.println(r);
        r = compare.compare( "aXb", "a?b");
        System.out.println(r);
        r = compare.compare( "abc", "xyz");
        System.out.println(r);
    }
}

And here's the output.

true
true
false
true
true
false
true
false

I feel this program is NOT 'fool proof' and can only be taken as an example to solve the regex matching problem

PS: Please see http://programmers.stackexchange.com/ for many such kinds of problems

share|improve this answer
    
thank you so much @Sanbhat. Your code helped me a lot! –  Yashwanth Aluru Mar 31 '13 at 15:41

Use regular expressions. Don't reinvent the wheel.

share|improve this answer

As i said, you can do this extracting simple sub string's.Here I checked for one case, do same thing for other cases.

     public class Assign {

public boolean compare(String s1, String s2)
{ String s="";
    try
    {
 s=s1.substring(s1.indexOf('a')+2,s1.indexOf('b')-1);
    }
    catch(IndexOutOfBoundsException e)
    {
    return false;
    }
    System.out.println("string: "+s);

    if(s2.substring(2,3).equals("*")&&s.length()>=1)
    {return true;}
    else
        return false;

}
public static void main(String args[])
{
    Assign a = new Assign();
    boolean r = a.compare("a b hello", "a * b");
    System.out.println(r);
}
}

EDIT : May be i have not checked for all the cases.It's a way to approach.

share|improve this answer
    
I feel that this solution is not generic enough.. for example - boolean r = a.compare("a b hello", "a b *"); threw the IndexOutOfBoundException –  sanbhat Mar 31 '13 at 10:55
    
@sanbhat edited. –  joey rohan Mar 31 '13 at 11:01
    
Now the program is giving me 'false'.. But compare of "a b hello", "a b *" should return 'true'; –  sanbhat Mar 31 '13 at 11:05
    
we should convert the strings to the character array and then we have to compare them. the main problem is, if there is a '*' in the second array. the first array is not getting skipped until it gets an element that matches with the last element of the second array –  Yashwanth Aluru Mar 31 '13 at 11:09
    
@sanbhat notice the comment by Alex Lynch, The info is not enough.Also i stated, i checked for "one case" i.e a hello b . –  joey rohan Mar 31 '13 at 11:12

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