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In my project I have a daemon process and a python UI to configure it.

One option is to start/stop the daemon. To do so the user have to provide the root password in order to call the stop the daemon. So clicking the stop button should show him the authentication popup (like in this link: http://i.stack.imgur.com/qcAk6.png

enter image description here

).

Could someone provide me a link or example on how to have it working ?

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Just as info I know that using gksudo is asking the root password in graphical mode, but it's not the same of I want. –  ZedTuX Mar 31 '13 at 11:03
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I don't know the answer, but I think you want to deal with PolicyKit. This question at Ask Ubuntu might be helpful in steering you in the right direction. askubuntu.com/questions/159722/… –  zigg Mar 31 '13 at 11:35
    
Thanks @zigg that's exactly what I was looking for! –  ZedTuX Mar 31 '13 at 11:44
    
After having tried it (so having a better understanding of PolicyKit) it's not what I was looking for (requesting root privileges to start a process) but it will be useful later :) Regarding my request I guess that only gksudo could be used to cover my point. –  ZedTuX Apr 6 '13 at 12:04

1 Answer 1

Sample Program using gksudo and subprocess:

#!/usr/bin/env python
import subprocess

# change gnome-terminal to command to start/stop daemon
call = ["gksudo", "--description", "Start daemon", "gnome-terminal"]

# runs, and doesn't block
proc = subprocess.Popen(call, stdout=subprocess.PIPE, stderr=subprocess.PIPE)

We can't assume the user didn't cancel the prompt so the daemon must be detected in another manner. If possible, D-Bus would be the best. See the tutorial for python.

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