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<input checked> vs <input checked="checked">

Both seem to work. On w3schools the first syntax is present.

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yep, should work in all major browsers –  Youn Elan Mar 31 '13 at 13:51

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Yes. This is valid.

Any boolean attribute doesn't have to have a value attached. Simply existing means "true".

The need to have a value comes from XML/XHTML where this syntax is not legal, though even in them, simply existing means "true" though the value depends on what spec you are adhering to (though the current whatwg spec does say that true and false are not valid values).

The whatwg current HTML standard has this to say about boolean attributes:

A number of attributes are boolean attributes. The presence of a boolean attribute on an element represents the true value, and the absence of the attribute represents the false value.

W3 HTML 5 essentially says that the value needs to be the lowercase ASCII value of the attribute name itself:

If the attribute is present, its value must either be the empty string or a value that is an ASCII case-insensitive match for the attribute's canonical name, with no leading or trailing whitespace.

This is echoed in the HTML 4.01 spec as well:

Boolean attributes may legally take a single value: the name of the attribute itself (e.g., selected="selected").

(thanks to Jukka K. Korpela for the links to the last two).

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By all HTML specs and drafts, the value of checked cannot be “anything at all.” On the contrary, the set of values is very limited. Browsers seem to accept any value, but this is not required in the specs. –  Jukka K. Korpela Mar 31 '13 at 14:27
    
@JukkaK.Korpela - Can you point me to where it says what is allowed? the only references I see is that true and false are not allowed. –  Oded Mar 31 '13 at 14:53
    
re HTML5 RC: w3.org/TR/html5/infrastructure.html#boolean-attributes says: “If the attribute is present, its value must either be the empty string or a value that is an ASCII case-insensitive match for the attribute's canonical name, with no leading or trailing whitespace.” –  Jukka K. Korpela Mar 31 '13 at 15:48
    
re HTML 4.01, w3.org/TR/REC-html40/intro/sgmltut.html#didx-boolean_attribute says: “Boolean attributes may legally take a single value: the name of the attribute itself (e.g., selected="selected").” –  Jukka K. Korpela Mar 31 '13 at 15:50
    
@JukkaK.Korpela - Thanks for that. Answer updated. –  Oded Mar 31 '13 at 15:56

Both are valid under HTML 4.01 specification, and both work in all browsers when the document is served with the HTML media type (text/html), which is what servers normally do. Some very early browsers accepted only the shorter form, but that’s very ancient history.

When served with an XML media type, such as those designed for XHTML, both make the document invalid and not even well-formed, so the browsers does not display the document at all, just an error message. In XHTML, the element needs to be <input checked="checked" />.

HTML5 drafts (and WHATWG “Living HTML”) does not change this much. It calls attributes like checked “boolean attributes”, which is misleading (values true and false are not accepted at all), but the syntactic rules are the same as for HTML 4.01, except that checked="" is allowed, too, and this attribute is only allowed when the type attribute is present and has the value radio or checkbox (which has always been the idea, but HTML5 proposes to make this a formal rule that will be checked by markup validators).

w3schools is very unreliable, see http://w3fools.com

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