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Is this:

if (myLongValue > 0) // 0 is displayed as int in Visual Studio tooltip

equal to:

if (myLongValue > 0L)

and is this using special opcode? (something like JZ - jump if zero in x86 asm).

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The 2 are perfectly equivalent in terms of IL. Let's take for example the following code snippet:

public static void Main(string[] args)
{
    long myLongValue = long.Parse("123");
    if (myLongValue > 0)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("ok");
    }
}

It gets compiled to the following IL (in Release mode):

.method public hidebysig static void Main(string[] args) cil managed
{
    .entrypoint
    .maxstack 2
    .locals init (
        [0] int64 myLongValue)
    L_0000: ldstr "123"
    L_0005: call int64 [mscorlib]System.Int64::Parse(string)
    L_000a: stloc.0 
    L_000b: ldloc.0 
    L_000c: ldc.i4.0 
    L_000d: conv.i8 
    L_000e: ble.s L_001a
    L_0010: ldstr "ok"
    L_0015: call void [mscorlib]System.Console::WriteLine(string)
    L_001a: ret 
}

Now replace if (myLongValue > 0) with if (myLongValue > 0L) and you get strictly equivalent IL.

A more optimal IL would have been this but unfortunately I am unable to make the compiler emit it:

.method public hidebysig static void Main(string[] args) cil managed
{
    .entrypoint
    .maxstack 2
    .locals init (
        [0] int64 myLongValue)
    L_0000: ldstr "123"
    L_0005: call int64 [mscorlib]System.Int64::Parse(string)
    L_000a: stloc.0 
    L_000b: ldloc.0 
    L_000c: ldc.i8.0 
    L_000d: ble.s L_001a
    L_0010: ldstr "ok"
    L_0015: call void [mscorlib]System.Console::WriteLine(string)
    L_001a: ret 
}

Here we don't need a conv.i8 instruction because we have directly pushed the supplied value of type Int64 onto the evaluation stack as an int64.

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In your first example, the operator > has a left-hand side which is long (System.Int64) and a right-hand side which is int (System.Int32). Since the C# specification does not define an overload of the > operator with that signature, we have to check if some conversion applies to one (or both) of the arguments (operands).

There exists an implicit conversion from int to long. The conversion in the other direction is not implicit. Therefore the right-hand side gets converted by a widening conversion, and the overload operator >(long x, long y) is used.

Since in this case, the right-hand side int is a compile-time literal, the compiler can do the widening of the constant, and so there's no difference between your two examples after compilation. Another answer has demonstrated what the output IL looks like.

So what if instead you had:

ulong myULongValue = XXX;
if (myULongValue > 0)
    ...

In general, there's no implicit conversion from int (signed) to ulong (unsigned). However, when the int is a compile-time constant (literal) that happens to be non-negative, there does exist a conversion. So my example above still works (and produces the same as if (myULongValue > 0ul)).

But for non-constant int, it has to fail:

ulong myULongValue = XXX;
int zero = 0;               // not const
if (myULongValue > zero)    // will NOT compile!
    ...
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Thanks for rich answer :) –  zgnilec Mar 31 '13 at 20:52

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