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I'm somewhat new to javascript and I just wondered if this is even possible.

Consider this:

if(foo('1')){
    // do something
}
else if(foo('2')){
    // do something else
}
else if(foo('3')){
    // do something different
}
else if(foo('4')){
    // do something completely different
}
...
else if(foo(n)){
    ...
}

foo(stringValue) is a method returning either true or false but the catch is that I can't alter that method in any way (e.g. changing the return value). Now if I wanted to refactor the code I could probably put all the foo parameter values in a collection, create a method for each of the unique operations from the if-statements, iterate over all parameter values and call the appropriate method whenever foo(n) returned true, but that just seems like a very ugly way of doing it. Is there maybe a better way of achieving this using a switch-statement?

share|improve this question
    
Is the string parameter the only independent variable of 'foo'? Or, is can foo('1') come up with multiple different results? –  Ben Yep Mar 31 '13 at 16:12
    
Hi Ben, I'm not sure if I understand your question correctly. I'm not calling foo in any of the if-statements. Could you elaborate on your comment? –  boomshanka Mar 31 '13 at 16:18
    
There is a way of using a switch-statement (see Juhana's answer), but I don't think that is necessarily better. What's wrong with your code? –  Bergi Mar 31 '13 at 16:26
    
You are calling foo in all of the if statements, foo('1') is a call to foo. If the post below don't answer your question, then I don't understand the question. The best way of going about this depends on the circumstances. For example, if foo('1') always returns the same value, and you have this code in your program, you might as well say if(true) or if(false). if the stringValue to be sent as a parameter is not known, that is a different story entirely. –  Ben Yep Mar 31 '13 at 16:27
    
I see - I didn't see the answer from Juhana until after I posted the comment but it makes a lot more sense now. Thanks for the elaboration though. –  boomshanka Mar 31 '13 at 16:41

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There's this trick you can use if you want to use a switch statement (not sure if it's actually better):

switch( true ) {
    case foo('1'):
        // do something
        break;
    case foo('2'):
        // and so on
        break;
    default:
        // all returned false
}
share|improve this answer
    
agreed its actually the same thing. –  Parthik Gosar Mar 31 '13 at 16:14
    
Don't forget to break; :-) –  Bergi Mar 31 '13 at 16:27
    
@Bergi I assumed from the question that the OP knows how switch statements work, but good point, I'll add them anyway. –  Juhana Mar 31 '13 at 16:28
    
I think you're right - the more I think about this the more I'm convinced that there is no real way out of this as long as the content of the case-statements are unique. –  boomshanka Mar 31 '13 at 16:43

I would prefer this. Just separating the checking code from the processing code.

var array = ["1", "2", "3", "4"];
var iLength = array.length;
for(var i= 0; i < iLength ;i++)
{
    var strValue = array[i];
    if(foo(strValue))
    {
        break;
    }
}

switch(strValue)
{
    case array[0]:
    //perform operations here for case "1"
    break;
    case array[1]:
    //perform operations here for case "2"
    break;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is very similar to what I imagined. As I wrote to Juhana there's still the part of having to write the switch statement with all the cases. By the way thanks for providing an alternative solution! –  boomshanka Mar 31 '13 at 16:45

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