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I am trying to run a very large Z3 python program, as the following sample:

 S,   (cl_3,cl_39,cl_11, me_32,m_59,m_81 …………) = EnumSort('S',['cl_3','cl_39','cl_11','me_32','me_59','me_81', …………..])
#########################################  
def fun(h1 , h2):
    conds = [
    (cl_3, me_32),
    (cl_39, me_59),
    (cl_11, me_81),
    ...
    ]
    and_conds = (And(h1==a, h2==b) for a,b in conds)
    return Or(*and_conds)

#######################################
def fun2(m1 , m2):
    conds = [
    (cl_3, me_32),
    (cl_39, me_59),
    (cl_11, me_81),
    ...
    ]
    and_conds = (And(m1==a, m2==b) for a,b in conds)
    return Or(*and_conds)
#######################################
def fun3(y1 , y2):
    conds = [
    (cl_3, me_32),
    (cl_39, me_59),
    (cl_11, me_81),
    ...
    ]
    and_conds = (And(y1==a, y2==b) for a,b in conds)
    return Or(*and_conds)

I have used a set constraint to retrieve the matched models; the matched model will be retrieved based on the function arguments, as the following:

s = Solver()
x1 = Const('x1', S)
x2 = Const('x2', S)
x3 = Const('x3', S)

s.add(fun(x1,x2))
s.add(fun2(x2,x3)
.
.
.
s.add(fun3(x3,x1)

print s.check()
print s.model()

But, I am getting the following error

ValueError: need more than 2123 values to unpack
share|improve this question
    
What's with the indentation?? –  Schoolboy Mar 31 '13 at 17:41
    
This is a sample of a very large program , based on the arguments passing –  Jordan England Mar 31 '13 at 17:44
    
Please give the full error, the stack trace shows us exactly where this happens and makes it clearer why - giving us only the error line makes this much harder to debug. –  Lattyware Mar 31 '13 at 18:13
2  
Also, please tell me that the '....'s you have inserted are not covering 2123+ names you are unpacking into. –  Lattyware Mar 31 '13 at 18:15
1  
@Lattyware I fear that's what he is doing. :facepalm: –  Tobia Mar 31 '13 at 18:18
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1 Answer

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This is not good coding practice:

S, (cl_3, cl_39, cl_11, me_32, m_59, m_81...) = EnumSort(...)

Instead of defining hundreds of named variables like that, you should use a list of names, a list of values, and build a dict to map them:

names = ['cl_3', 'cl_39'...] # don't write this list by hand, if you can avoid it
# eg.: ['cl_{}'.format(i) for i in range(50)] + ['m_{}'.format(i) for i...]

S, values = EnumSort('S', names)

if len(names) != len(values):
    raise Exception('...')

name_to_value = dict(zip(names, values))

# then you can use name_to_value['cl_3'] and so on
share|improve this answer
    
The golden rule is that if you are spending a lot of time doing the same thing again and again, the computer should be doing it, not you. Data structures will make your life easier. –  Lattyware Mar 31 '13 at 18:19
    
could you please explain further with sample example based on my code –  Jordan England Mar 31 '13 at 18:19
    
@JordanEngland Given you didn't give us a complete example, I imagine it will be hard for anyone to produce one. Simplify your example down and maybe an answer will follow suit. –  Lattyware Mar 31 '13 at 18:20
1  
@JordanEngland The only "advanced" code in there is dict(zip(N,V)) which takes an ordered list (or tuple) of names N and a corresponding list of values V and builds a dict, mapping each name to its value. Eg: ages = dict(zip(['John', 'Mary'], [20, 35])). Everything else is just basic Python. The main point is do not write down 2123 variable names by hand. –  Tobia Mar 31 '13 at 18:24
    
@JordanEngland Please be sure to mark this answer as accepted, unless you need more information. –  Tobia Apr 16 '13 at 9:54
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