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Is there a general purpose solution for preserving dom state so that when a user returns to a page by using back/forward, the whole page is in the exact state that they left it?

This post asks and answers why the behavior is inconsistent with different browsers and different javascript libraries...

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1195440/ajax-back-button-and-dom-updates

...but I am curious if anyone has a general solution to this problem that doesn't require reloading the page.

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2 Answers 2

I'm afraid there isn't, and there really can't be because we're talking about browser behavior that's completely discretionary and not standards-defined. You could use Ajax to aggressively synchronize relevant DOM state to a session on a server, and always restore from that state on page load, but that will preserve the most recent state for that page, not the state that was necessarily present at a given desired point in the browser history.

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2  
Wow, it seems like this must be a universal problem for a lot of people. Maybe I will save state to the server during unload so that I can be sure to have the very latest changes. I do wish that all the browsers behaved like FF 3+ and just did the right thing on this. –  Pete Oct 15 '09 at 20:53
    
Yes, score one for Firefox. –  Isaac Bolinger Mar 19 at 17:23

You can use this cache busting technique in rails to make it work in modern browsers (chrome, ie8+, ff 3.5+). This worked for me on my last project when we had ajax update the dom and had to navigate back and have the ajax updates persist.

response.headers["Cache-Control"] = "no-cache, no-store, max-age=0, must-revalidate"
response.headers["Pragma"] = "no-cache"
response.headers["Expires"] = "Fri, 01 Jan 1990 00:00:00 GMT"
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