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I am trying to make a simple program in Python that calculates the largest odd number out of the values x, y, z. How do I give the user an option to pick the values for x, y, and z?

So the program will ask what x, y, and z is and then say "x,y,z is the largest odd" or the numbers are all even.

What I have so far is below. Is this at least a decent start?

  # This program exmamines variables x, y, and z 
  # and prints the largest odd number among them

  if x%2 !== 0 and x > y and y > z:
      print 'x is the largest odd among x, y, and z'
  elif y%2 !== 0 and y > z and z > x:
     print 'y is the largest odd among x, y, and z'
  elif z%2 !== 0 and z > y and y > x:
     print 'z is the largest odd among x, y, and z'
  elif x%2 == 0 or y%2 == 0 or z%2 == 0:
     print 'even'

With thkang post, I now have:

  # This program exmamines variables x, y, and z 
  # and prints the largest odd number among them

  if x%2 !== 0:
    if y%2 !== 0:
      if z%2 !== 0:
        if x > y and x > z: #x is the biggest odd
        elif y > z and y > x: #y is the biggest odd
        elif z > x and z > y: #z is the biggest odd

      else: #z is even
        if x > y: #x is the biggest odd
        else: #y is the biggest odd

    else: #y is even
      if z%2 != 0: #z is odd
        if x > z: #x is the biggest odd
        else: #z is the biggest odd
      else: #y,z are even and x is the biggest odd

  else: #x is even
    if y%2 != 0 and z%2 != 0; #y,z is odd
      if y > z: #y is the biggest odd
      else: #z is the biggest odd
    else: #x and y is even
      if z%2 != 0: #z is the biggest odd
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Basically if you have an input like: 3, 7, 2. Your application will print 7. So the first thing to do is probably sort them and then check from the biggest to see if it is an odd, if any of them is odd, print it. If none of them is, print another message. –  Shane Hsu Mar 31 '13 at 18:25
    
This isn't a homework or take home interview question is it? :P –  Bjorn Tipling Mar 31 '13 at 18:27
    
@BjornTipling this is a question out of Intro to Comp and Programming Using Python. –  dustin Mar 31 '13 at 18:29
1  
Side note: python allows you to write x > y > z for x > y and y > z, an behaves as inteded. –  phg Mar 31 '13 at 18:29
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9 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

it would be better to filter the numbers, then sort them.

numbers = [x, y, z]

sorted_odd_nums = sorted((x for x in enumerate(numbers) if x[1]%2), 
                         key = lambda x:x[1], 
                         reverse=True)

if not sorted_odd_nums:
   # all numbers were even and filtered out.
elif sorted_odd_nums[0][0] == 0:
   # x is the biggest odd number
elif sorted_odd_nums[0][0] == 1:
   # y is the biggest odd number
elif sorted_odd_nums[0][0] == 2:
   # z is the biggest odd number

what it does:

enumerate(numbers) returns a sequence of (index, item) pairs. since original list was [x, y, z], we can keep the track of x, y, z even after filter and sort.

(x for x in enumerate(numbers) if x[1]%2) filters above enumeration if the second item in given tuple is not an even number.

sort( ... , key=lambda x:x[1], reverse=True) sorts filtered items using value of their second-indexed item(which is original number) in descending order.

user input

to read from user, the easiest way is using raw_input(py2) / input(py3k).

number = int(raw_input('enter a number: '))

using only if-statements

you'd have to nest if-statements. like:

if x%2: # x is odd
  if y%2: # y is odd
    if z%2: #z is odd
      if x>y and x>z: #x is the biggest odd number
      elif y>z and y>x: #y is the biggest odd number
      elif z>x and z>y: #z is the biggest odd number

    else: #z is even
      if x>y: #x is the biggest odd number
      else: #y is the biggest odd number
  else: #y is even
    if z%2: #z is odd
...
share|improve this answer
    
Or sort them and then just get the first largest odd number, that way you go through the list less often. Or you could prioritize oddness over value in a custom sort function. –  Bjorn Tipling Mar 31 '13 at 18:24
    
@thkang I am only in the if then else section of the book. This way may be more efficient but can we do it without I know? –  dustin Mar 31 '13 at 18:30
    
@dustin for x, y, z there are 8 cases of their parity (from x=odd, y=odd, z=odd to x=even, y=even, z=even) and 6 cases of putting them in a line(from x, y, z to z, y, x) which gives you 48 cases. It'd be a long if-elif-else statement! –  thkang Mar 31 '13 at 18:34
1  
@dustin condition x%2 is true if x%2 is not 0, which means x is an odd number. –  thkang Mar 31 '13 at 18:56
1  
@dustin your code lacks edge cases where only one number in x, y, z is odd, and the boolean not-equal operator is !=, not !== –  thkang Mar 31 '13 at 19:03
show 7 more comments

Approach

Avoid using if-stmts to find maximum. Use python builtin max. Use either generator or filter to find only the odd numbers.

Using builtins like this is safer/more reliable because it is simpler to compose them, the code is well-tested, and the code executes mostly in C (rather than multiple byte code instructions).

Code

def find_largest_odd(*args):
    return max(arg for arg in args if arg & 1)

or:

def find_largest_odd(*args):
    return max(filter(lambda x: x & 1, args))

Test

>>> def find_largest_odd(*args):
...     return max(arg for arg in args if arg & 1)
... 
>>> print find_largest_odd(1, 3, 5, 7)
7
>>> print find_largest_odd(1, 2, 4, 6)
1

and:

>>> def find_largest_odd(*args):
...     return max(filter(lambda x: x & 1, args))
>>> print find_largest_odd(1, 3, 5, 7)
7
>>> print find_largest_odd(1, 2, 4, 6)
1

If you pass an empty sequence or provide only even numbers, you will get a ValueError:

>>> find_largest_odd(0)
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "<stdin>", line 2, in find_largest_odd
ValueError: max() arg is an empty sequence

References

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try:
    largest = max(val for val in (x,y,z) if val % 2)
    print(largest)
except ValueError:
    print('Even')

Note that sorted is a O(n log n) operation, while max is O(n). The speed difference may not matter for sequences that are this short, but it is good practice to use the best tool for the job.

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something like this:

def get_max_odd(*lis):
    try:
         return sorted(i for i in lis if i%2)[-1] #IndexError if no odd item found
    except IndexError:    
         return "even"


In [8]: get_max_odd(1,2,3)
Out[8]: 3

In [9]: get_max_odd(2,4,6)
Out[9]: 'even'

In [10]: get_max_odd(2,5,6)
Out[10]: 5

In [11]: get_max_odd(2,4,6,8,9,10,20)
Out[11]: 9
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Incase anyone is looking for a simple solution using condition statements

x,y,z = 4,1,6
largest = None
if x%2:
 largest = x
if y%2:
 if y > largest:
  largest = y
if z%2:
 if z > largest:
  largest = z
if largest:
 print "largest number is" largest
else
 print "there are no odd numbers"
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This is the finger exercise from Ch.2 of Introduction to Computation and Programming Using Python by John V. Guttag. It's the recommended text for the MITx: 6.00x Introduction to Computer Science and Programming. The book is written to be used with Python 2.7.

'Write a program that examines three variables x,y and z, and prints the largest odd number among them. If none of them are odd, it should print a message to that effect.'

At this point the book has only introduced variable assignment and conditional branching programs and the print function. I know as I'm working through it. To that end this is the code I wrote:

if x%2 or y%2 or z%2 != 0: 
    if x <= y <= z or y <= x <= z:
        if z%2 != 0:
            ans = z
        elif y > x and y%2 != 0:
            ans = y
        else:
            ans = x

    elif z <= y <= x or y <= z <= x:
        if x%2 != 0:
            ans = x
        elif z > y and z%2 != 0:
            ans = z
        else:
            ans = y

    elif z <= x <= y or x <= z <= y:
        if y%2 != 0:
            ans = y
        elif x > z and x%2 != 0:
            ans = x
        else:
            ans = z
else:
    ans = 'None of them are odd'
print str(ans)

It seems to work for all the combinations I have tried, but it would be useful to know if it can be shortened bearing in mind my points from paragraph three. I appreciate it has been aswered, but by providing this answer, other users are more likely to come across it when searching for answers to the question in the book.

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I am working my way through the same book by Guttag (and Python 2.7). Others reading it may take cognisance that lists (or slicing them) haven't been introduced yet though I have used one in my solution (I think it works fine!?!). And you don't really need to reverse the list order if you would rather slice from the end instead of the beginning of the list.

First I created an empty list (lst). But before I use it I check if all of x, y and z are not odd (Guttag asks if 'none of them are odd'). Then, each variable in turn is checked to see if its odd and if it is, it gets added to the list. I sorted the list in a descending order (i.e. largest odd numbers to the front).. then check to make sure that it has at least one element (no point in printing an empty list) and then print the first element.

x,y,z = 111,45,67

lst = []
if x%2==0 and y%2==0 and z%2==0:
    print 'none of x,y or z is an odd number'
else:
    if x%2!=0:
        lst.append(x)
    if y%2!=0:
        lst.append(y)
    if z%2!=0:
        lst.append(z)
lst.sort(reverse = True)
if len(lst)!=0:
    print lst[:1]
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Assuming we aren't going to use something fancy :-) like the max and sort functions in python...I think it's safe to say than an "assignment" statement is fair game....we do after all have to assign x,y and z.

As such: I created my own variable called "largest" initialized as zero. I assign that variable the first odd number of x,y,z (interrogated in that order). Then I simply check the remaining values and if each one is greater than "largest" and is also an odd number then I make it the value of "largest" -- and check the next value. Once all the values are checked, "largest" holds the value of the largest odd number or zero (which means I never did find an odd number and I print a message to that effect.

This is the same method you could use to read an arbitrary number (perhaps 10) of values from a user and print the largest odd one after all values are entered. Just check each value as it's entered against the current "largest" one.

Yes, you do need to be careful to support negative odd numbers -- you need to handle the assignment of "largest" to the first odd number whether or not it's greater than zero.

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It's actually easier for me to to think about this problem with more values rather than only 3 (x,y,z). Suppose I show you a list of words Apple, dog, Banana, cat, monkey, Zebra, elephant... etc. Let's say there are 26 words denoted by variables a,b,c,d,e,f...x,y, and z.

If you need to find the "largest word" (in dictionary order) that begins with a lowercase letter, you don't need to compare every word with every other word. Our brains don't typically sort the entire list into order and then pick from the end either...well...mine doesn't anyway.

I just start at the front of the list and work my way through it. The first time I find a word that starts with a lowercase letter...I memorize it and then read until I get another lowercase word -- then I check which is larger and memorize just that word.... I never have to go back and check any of the others. One pass on the list and I'm done. In the list above...my brain immediately discards "Zebra" because the case is wrong.

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