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I need a regex to validate passwords with the following specs:

It must be between 6 and 20 characters with at least one upper case letter, one lower case letter and one digit

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10  
What have you tried? Can you add anything to this question to make it read less like a "do my work for me" request? –  Michael Petrotta Oct 15 '09 at 16:09
    
it's unlikly people will do your homework –  Jan Bannister Oct 15 '09 at 16:20
2  
Actually it's very likely, but you'll pay the price in reputation. –  Beta Oct 15 '09 at 16:32
1  
I don't understand why people get so bent out of shape when someone requests help writing a regular expression. It's a valid question perfectly acceptable for StackOverflow. Either help, or don't. –  Steve Wortham Oct 15 '09 at 16:43
1  
@Steve: well, since you asked, it bothers me because a) it's a common human response to be annoyed by someone asking for help, but unwilling to help themselves, and b) the tone makes it clear to me that the OP will use the answer, but not attempt to understand it, and his software (which I might use someday) will be the worse for it. –  Michael Petrotta Oct 15 '09 at 17:09
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3 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I think this works:

^(?=.*[A-Z])(?=.*[a-z])(?=.*[0-9]).{6,20}$

Here it is with test cases in Regex Hero.

The idea is to use positive lookaheads to ensure that at least one lower case letter, one upper case letter, and one digit are contained within the password. And then as a last step I simply specify a dot to allow any characters in the 6-20 character range.

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1  
+1: loved this, ty –  Rubens Farias Oct 15 '09 at 16:15
    
That does not work. That will pass values of 100 or more characters. –  John Gietzen Oct 15 '09 at 16:16
1  
Will that match a string like "a1A===="? That would seem to meet Jangwenyi's criteria. –  Jim Lewis Oct 15 '09 at 16:17
1  
Good, but this doesn't prevent other characters from breaking the length limit. Also, strictly speaking Jangwenyi didn't say that only [a-zA-Z0-9]{6} were required. So %%%Aa1 should be allowed and ABCDEabcde1234512345%%%%%%%%% should be forbidden, but your regex does the opposite. –  Beta Oct 15 '09 at 16:20
1  
No, yeah, I understand that regexps are powerful, but there are often so many pitfalls and unforeseen issues that they end up being overly complicated and unreliable. –  John Gietzen Oct 15 '09 at 17:52
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Regexes are used for searching, not for validation. You should not strive to do this in a single regex.

That being said, since you are looking for character classes, and since regexes support them very well, I would suggest using two or three regexes, checking for a match of each one.

    bool IsPasswordValid(string password)
    {
        if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(password) ||
            password.Length > 20 ||
            password.Length < 6)
        {
            return false;
        }
        else if(!Regex.IsMatch(password, "\d") ||
            !Regex.IsMatch(password, "[a-z]") ||
            !Regex.IsMatch(password, "[A-Z]"))
        {
            return false;
        }
        else
        {
            return true;
        }
    }

This is WAY more efficient than trying to encode all of the possible combinations in an overly complicated Regex.

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Regexes are used all the time for validation. –  Steve Wortham Oct 15 '09 at 16:08
3  
Agreed, but that is not what they are made for. The regex to FIND all valid IP addresses is WAY simpler and more efficient than the regex to VALIDATE an IP address. Regexes are a search tool. Useful for validation, yes, but not made for it. –  John Gietzen Oct 15 '09 at 16:10
2  
I agree and this is much easier to read and maintain. Think about someone trying to maintain the other regexes posted. –  JonMR Oct 15 '09 at 16:17
2  
It is completely incorrect to say that regular expressions are not used for validation. Regular expressions were invented as a way to concisely characterize membership rules for regular languages. The regular languages are those languages whose members can be decided, ie, verified, by a finite state machine. That regular expressions can be used for search came later in the history of the study of regular languages. If this subject interests you, I started (but never completed) a series of articles on it: blogs.msdn.com/ericlippert/archive/tags/Regular+Expressions/… –  Eric Lippert Oct 15 '09 at 17:32
1  
@Eric, I stand corrected. –  John Gietzen May 17 '11 at 20:30
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This allows spaces and special characters, but should follow your specs:

^(?=.*\d)(?=.*[A-Z])(?=.*[a-z]).{6,20}$

I use Expresso to help test my .Net regular expressions.

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