Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In this Prolog code I intend to list the first N primes,

(...)

biggerPrime(N,P) :-
    isPrime(N),
    P is N,
    !.

biggerPrime(N,P) :-
    N1 = N+1,
    biggerPrime(N1,P).

primeListAcc(0,A,R,R) :- !.

primeList(N,L) :-
    primeListAcc(N,1,[],L).

primeListAcc(N,A,L,R) :-
    N1 is N-1,
    biggerPrime(A,P),
    A1 is P+1,
    primeListAcc(N1,A1,[P|L],R).

And it works fine if I want the list ordered backwards:

?- primeList(5,L).
L = [11, 7, 5, 3, 2].

But if I change the last line of the code from [P|L] to [L|P] like this:

primeListAcc(N,A,L,R) :-
        N1 is N-1,
        biggerPrime(A,P),
        A1 is P+1,
        primeListAcc(N1,A1,[L|P],R).

I get:

?- primeList(5,L).
L = [[[[[[]|2]|3]|5]|7]|11].

What am I missing? This is driving me mad!

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Great, so you've discovered the problem of adding elements to the end of a list. In Prolog, we can do it with

add(X,L,Z):- L=[X|Z].

wait, what? How to read this? We must know the calling convention here. We expect L and Z to come in as uninstantiated variables, and we arrange for L from now on to point to a newly created cons node with X at its head, and Z its tail. Z to be instantiated, possibly, in some future call.

IOW what we create here is an open-ended list, L = [X|Z] = [X, ...]:

primeList(N,L) :-
    primeListAcc(N,1,[],L).

primeListAcc(N,A,Z,L) :- N > 0,   % make it explicitly mutually-exclusive,
    N1 is N-1,                    %   do not rely on red cuts which are easily
    biggerPrime(A,P),             %   invalidated if clauses are re-arranged!
    A1 is P+1,                    
    L = [P|R],                    % make L be a new, open-ended node, holding P
    primeListAcc(N1,A1,Z,R).      % R, the tail of L, to be instantiated further

primeListAcc(0,A,R,R).            % keep the predicate's clauses together

We can see now that Z is not really needed here, as it carries the [] down the chain of recursive calls, unchanged. So we can re-write primeListAcc without the Z argument, so that its final clause will be

primeListAcc(0,A,R):- R=[].

Keeping Z around as uninstantiated variable allows for it to be later instantiated possibly with a non-empty list as well (of course, only once (unless backtracking occurs)). This forms the basis of "difference list" technique.


To answer your literal question - here, consider this interaction transcript:

1 ?- X=[a|b].

X = [a|b] 
2 ?- X=[a|b], Y=[X|c].

X = [a|b]
Y = [[a|b]|c] 

the [a|b] output is just how a cons node gets printed, when its tail (here, b) is not a list. Atoms, as numbers, are not lists.

share|improve this answer
    
Very useful and thorough, thank you! –  rgcalsaverini Nov 14 '13 at 18:23

Recall that a list is either the empty list [] or a term with functor '.' and two arguments, whose second argument is a list. The syntax [P|Ps] is shorthand notation for the term '.'(P, Ps), which is a list if Ps is a list (as is the case in your example). The term '.'(Ps, P), on the other hand, which can also be written as [Ps|P] (as you are doing), is not a list if P is not a list. You can obtain a reverse list with reverse/2.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.