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I'm currently working on Java for Android. I try to implement the FFT in order to realize a kind of viewer of the frequencies.

Actually I was able to do it, but the display is not fluid at all. I added some traces in order to check the treatment time of each part of my code, and the fact is that the FFT takes about 300ms to be applied on my complex array, that owns 4096 elements. And I need it to take less than 100ms, as my thread (that displays the frequencies) is refreshed every 100ms. I reduced the initial array in order that the FFT results own only 1028 elements, and it works, but the result is deprecated.

Does someone have an idea ?

I used the default fft.java and Complex.java classes that can be found on the internet.

For information, my code computing the FFT is the following :

int bytesPerSample = 2;
Complex[] x = new Complex[bufferSize/2] ;

for (int index = 0 ; index < bufferReadResult - bytesPerSample + 1; index += bytesPerSample)
{
// 16BITS = 2BYTES

    float asFloat = Float.intBitsToFloat(asInt);


    double sample = 0;
    for (int b = 0; b < bytesPerSample; b++) {
        int v = buffer[index + b];
        if (b < bytesPerSample - 1 || bytesPerSample == 1) {
                v &= 0xFF;
        }
                        sample += v << (b * 8);
     }

    double sample32 = 100 * (sample / 32768.0); // don't know the use of this compute...
    x[index/bytesPerSample] = new Complex(sample32, 0);
}


    Complex[] tx = new Complex[1024]; // size = 2048 

///// reduction of the size of the signal in order to improve the fft traitment time
for (int i = 0; i < x.length/4; i++)
{

    tx[i] = new Complex(x[i*4].re(), 0);

 }

// Signal retrieval thanks to the FFT
fftRes = FFT.fft(tx);
share|improve this question
    
I would start by replacing Complex with primitives types, i.e doubles. It's a lot of work and you'll have to deal with parallel arrays. This step alone will give you a big speed increase. Creating objects is intrinsically expensive and, they are created on the heap and subject to garbage collection. I suspect that if you examine logcat, or use the heap viewer, you will see a lot of garbage collection which will kill your frame rates. Primitives are created on the method stack which is not subject to garbage collection and is simply thrown away when the method exits. –  Simon Mar 31 '13 at 20:26
    
If @Simon's idea doesn't get enough performance, a high performance native FFT library like FFTW (fftw.org) is the next step. –  Gene Apr 1 '13 at 0:53

3 Answers 3

I don't know Java, but you're way of converting between your input data and an array of complex values seems very convoluted. You're building two arrays of complex data where only one is necessary.

Also it smells like your complex real and imaginary values are doubles. That's way over the top for what you need, and ARMs are veeeery slow at double arithmetic anyway. Is there a complex class based on single precision floats?

Thirdly you're performing a complex fft on real data by filling the imaginary part of your complexes with zero. Whilst the result will be correct it is twice as much work straight off (unless the routine is clever enough to spot that, which I doubt). If possible perform a real fft on your data and save half your time.

And then as Simon says there's the whole issue of avoiding garbage collection and memory allocation.

Also it looks like your FFT has no preparatory step. This mean that the routine FFT.fft() is calculating the complex exponentials every time. The longest part of the FFT calculation is working out the complex exponentials, which is a shame because for any given FFT length the exponentials are constants. They don't depend on your input data at all. In the real time world we use FFT routines where we calculate the exponentials once at the start of the program and then the actual fft itself takes that const array as one of its inputs. Don't know if your FFT class can do something similar.

If you do end up going to something like FFTW then you're going to have to get used to calling C code from your Java. Also make sure you get a version that supports (I think) NEON, ARM's answer to SSE, AVX and Altivec. It's worth ploughing through their release notes to check. Also I strongly suspect that FFTW will only be able to offer a significant speed up if you ask it to perform an FFT on single precision floats, not doubles.

Google luck!

--Edit--

I meant of course 'good luck'. Give me a real keyboard quick, these touchscreen ones are unreliable...

share|improve this answer
    
Good answer. ARMs are veeeery slow at double arithmetic anyway Do you have any reference for this? Received wisdom, and my Googling, suggest that there is little difference in speed - ignoring memory usage. –  Simon Apr 1 '13 at 10:35
    
Hmmm, interesting. I doubt that the ARM core, with only a few tens of thousands of transistors, uses many of them for floating point math. That means the math has to be done the long way, so it's not going to be fast. Whereas an X86 core has millions of transistors to play with so Intel and especially AMD (the HPC crowd pleaser) can afford to blow a lot of them on a decent parallel FPU coprocessor. –  bazza Apr 1 '13 at 19:28
    
ARM's NEON however is an unknown quantity to me. I suspect that it's well set up for single precision math, that being adequate for video and audio work (the main users of math performance on ARM powered devices). That's also how Motorola setup the Altivec, and I suspect Intel have done the same with SSE. –  bazza Apr 1 '13 at 19:30
    
Thank you for the complement anyway :) I have no reference for ARMs specifically, just an observation that on every other CPU I've ever user (AMD, Intel, PowerPC & Cell) double is alway way slower than real. I don't anticipate ARM being any different. One observation - some C compilers treat float as double anyway (something to do with FPU hardware I think). I don't know Java at all, but might it be doing something similar? –  bazza Apr 1 '13 at 19:44

First, thanks for all your answers. I followed them and made two test :

  • first one, I replace the double used in my Complex class by float. The result is just a bit better, but not enough.

  • then I've rewroten the fft method in order not to use Complex anymore, but a two-dimensional float array instead. For each row of this array, the first column contains the real part, and the second one the imaginary part. I also changed my code in order to instanciate the float array only once, on the onCreate method.

And the result... is worst !! Now it takes a little bit more than 500ms instead of 300ms. I don't know what to do now.

You can find below the initial fft fonction, and then the one I've re-wroten. Thanks for your help.

// compute the FFT of x[], assuming its length is a power of 2
public static Complex[] fft(Complex[] x) {
    int N = x.length;

    // base case
    if (N == 1) return new Complex[] { x[0] };

    // radix 2 Cooley-Tukey FFT
    if (N % 2 != 0) { throw new RuntimeException("N is not a power of 2 : " + N); }

    // fft of even terms
    Complex[] even = new Complex[N/2];
    for (int k = 0; k < N/2; k++) {
        even[k] = x[2*k];
    }
    Complex[] q = fft(even);

    // fft of odd terms
    Complex[] odd  = even;  // reuse the array
    for (int k = 0; k < N/2; k++) {
        odd[k] = x[2*k + 1];
    }
    Complex[] r = fft(odd);

    // combine
    Complex[] y = new Complex[N];
    for (int k = 0; k < N/2; k++) {
        double kth = -2 * k * Math.PI / N;
        Complex wk = new Complex(Math.cos(kth), Math.sin(kth));
        y[k]       = q[k].plus(wk.times(r[k]));
        y[k + N/2] = q[k].minus(wk.times(r[k]));
    }

    return y;
}

public static float[][] fftf(float[][] x) {
    /**
     *  x[][0] = real part
     *  x[][1] = imaginary part
     */

    int N = x.length;

    // base case
    if (N == 1) return new float[][] { x[0] };

    // radix 2 Cooley-Tukey FFT
    if (N % 2 != 0) { throw new RuntimeException("N is not a power of 2 : " + N); }

    // fft of even terms
    float[][] even = new float[N/2][2];
    for (int k = 0; k < N/2; k++) {
        even[k] = x[2*k];
    }
    float[][] q = fftf(even);

    // fft of odd terms
    float[][] odd  = even;  // reuse the array
    for (int k = 0; k < N/2; k++) {
        odd[k] = x[2*k + 1];
    }
    float[][] r = fftf(odd);

    // combine
    float[][] y = new float[N][2];
    double kth, wkcos, wksin    ;
    for (int k = 0; k < N/2; k++) {
        kth = -2 * k * Math.PI / N;
        //Complex wk = new Complex(Math.cos(kth), Math.sin(kth));
        wkcos = Math.cos(kth)   ;   // real part
        wksin = Math.sin(kth)   ;   // imaginary part

        //  y[k]       = q[k].plus(wk.times(r[k]));
        y[k][0] = (float) (q[k][0] + wkcos * r[k][0] - wksin * r[k][1]);
        y[k][1] = (float) (q[k][1] + wkcos * r[k][1] + wksin * r[k][0]);

        //  y[k + N/2] = q[k].minus(wk.times(r[k]));
        y[k + N/2][0] = (float) (q[k][0] - (wkcos * r[k][0] - wksin * r[k][1]));
        y[k + N/2][1] = (float) (q[k][1] - (wkcos * r[k][1] + wksin * r[k][0]));
    }

    return y;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Math.cos(), Math.sin()... You're still computing the exponentials every time. Also (unless Java changed what '%' meant from what it means in C) N % 2 == 0 is not a test for being a power of 2, it's a test for being divisible by 2. Also I'm not sure you've embraced the spirit of Simon's original advice - I'm seeing a few = new around the code. And it still looks like you're bent on doing a complex FFT with the imaginary input set to zero. That's totally unnecessary if your input is strictly real (which your original showed to be the case) and doubles the compute time needlessly. Do a real FFT. –  bazza Apr 1 '13 at 19:41
    
damn my answers appears above, i dunno why... –  MrFlo Apr 2 '13 at 9:08

actually I think I don't understand everything.

  • First, about Math.cos and Math.sin : how do you want me not to compute it each time ? Do you mean that I should instanciate the whole values only once (e.g store it in an array) and use them for each compute ?
  • Second, about the N % 2, indeed it's not very useful, I could make the test before the call of the function.
  • Third, about Simon's advice : I mixed what he said and what you said, that's why I've replaced the Complex by a two-dimensional float[][]. If that was not what he suggested, then what was it ?
  • At least, I'm not a FFT expert, so what do you mean by making a "real FFT" ? Do you mean that my imaginary part is useless ? If so, I'm not sure, because later in my code, I compute the magnitude of each frequence, so sqrt(real[i]*real[i] + imag[i]*imag[i]). And I think that my imaginary part is not equal to zero...

thanks !

share|improve this answer
    
1st: yes! Sin & cos are slow, and if you precompute the whole lot and store you never have to again. 2nd: nothing wrong with test inside so long as it's right. N % 2 isn't. 3rd: you have a recursively called function, and every time you call it you allocate more memory and copy the input data. Have one copy of the data on the stack of the caller and calculate indexes into it. 4th: your input data is purely real. The first layer of the FFT thus becomes very simple (there's a lot of x 0 going on). Exploit that and a big chunk of the work goes away. The output will still be complex. –  bazza Apr 2 '13 at 22:13
    
1st and 2nd are done, it saves a little bit time. 3rd : I have to work on it, dunno how for the moment. 4th : what do you mean by "the first layer" ? :( I tried to simplify but don't know how to do it... will my result still me the same if I simplify, or will I lose some information ? –  MrFlo Apr 3 '13 at 8:25
    
3rd: it would be much easier if instead of having a recursively called function you just had two loops in a single function. 4th: at the moment your function recurses almost immediately, stopping only when N==1. When that returns, you then do a lot of maths like q[k][1] + wkcos * r[k][1] + wksin * r[k][0]. If your original input is purely real, then for the first go at this sort of maths q[k][1] and r[k][1] are zero, so a big chunk of that arithmetic * or + zero. Try stepping through your code with a debugger to see. Losing the recursion and having two loops will make it clearer. Good luck! –  bazza Apr 3 '13 at 19:29
    
ok i'll try that, i keep you posted. Thanks ! –  MrFlo Apr 4 '13 at 13:21

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