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I noticed that while practicing by doing a simple console-based quiz app. When I'm using rand() it gives me the same value several times in a row. The smaller number range, the bigger the problem is.

For example

for (i=0; i<10; i++) {
    x = rand() % 20 + 1;
    cout << x << ", ";
}

Will give me 1, 1, 1, 2, 1, 1, 1, 1, 14, - there are definetely too much ones, right? I usually got from none to 4 odd numbers (rest is just the same, it can also be 11, 11, 11, 4, 11 ...)

Am I doing something wrong? Or rand() is not so random that I thought it is?
(Or is it just some habit from C#/Java that I'm not aware of? It happens a lot to me, too...)

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2  
something % 1 always gives 0. Was it rand() % 20 + 1? –  Daniel Fischer Mar 31 '13 at 20:19
5  
You need to seed your random. Look into srand. People frequently use time() as a seed (although this is not necessarily good practice). –  RageD Mar 31 '13 at 20:19
1  
@RageD: And you need to call srand() exactly once before any calls to rand(). –  Keith Thompson Mar 31 '13 at 20:19
    
try this before for loop: srand(time(NULL)); –  ogzd Mar 31 '13 at 20:19
    
The code in your question will not produce the output in your question; it will give 20, 20, 20, 20, .... Please copy-and-paste the code and the output from the same program. (Perhaps you meant rand() % 20 + 1?) –  Keith Thompson Mar 31 '13 at 20:21

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If I run that code a couple of times, I get different output. Sure, not as varied as I'd like, but seemingly not deterministic (although of course it is, since rand() only gives pseudo-random numbers...).

However, the way you treat your numbers isn't going to give you a uniform distribution over [1,20], which I guess is what you expect. To achieve that is rather more complicated, but in no way impossible. For an example, take a look at the documentation for <random> at cplusplus.com - at the bottom there's a showcase program that generates a uniform distribution over [0,1). To get that to [1,20), you simply change the input parameters to the generator - it can give you a uniform distribution over any range you like.

I did a quick test, and called rand() one million times. As you can see in the output below, even at very large sample sizes, there are some nonuniformities in the distribution. As the number of samples goes to infinity, the line will (probably) flatten out, using something like rand() % 20 + 1 gives you a distribution that takes very long time to do so. If you take something else (like the example above) your chances are better at achieving a uniform distribution even for quite small sample sizes.

1 million calls to rand()

Edit:
I see several others posting about using srand() to seed the random number generator before using it. This is good advice, but it won't solve your problem in this case. I repeat: seeding is not the problem in this case.

Seeds are mainly used to control the reproducibility of the output of your program. If you seed your random number with a constant value (e.g. 0), the program will give the same output every time, which is useful for testing that everything works the way it should. By seeding with something non-constant (the current time is a popular choice) you ensure that the results vary between different runs of the program.

Not calling srand() at all is the same as calling srand(1), by the C++ standard. Thus, you'll get the same results every time you run the program, but you'll have a perfectly valid series of pseudo-random numbers within each run.

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I note that while the scaling approach is a lot better than rand() % 20, it's still slightly non-uniform because the number of values that multiply up to each is going to be slightly different. To see why consider the case where you are multiple up to a range similar in size to the number of bits in the mantissa of your [0,1) ranged representation. –  Jack Aidley Mar 31 '13 at 21:17
1  
@JackAidley: Sure - but the scaling approach is usually "good enough" (i.e. it's really only scientific computations, or algorithms that heavily depend on the numbers being as random as possible that can't make do with it). However, you could just as well use the uniform distribution I linked to without scaling - and then it'd actually be uniform =). I'll update my answer to reflect this. –  Tomas Lycken Mar 31 '13 at 21:24
    
One of the major purposes of srand is to allow you to be able to replicate results for troubleshooting unexpected results, which is the point of this particular question. The SO saw an unexpected pattern. –  Jeff Wolski Mar 31 '13 at 21:48
    
@TomasLycken - I was doing the same thing, but running the loop 10kk times and the chart generated using output of my code was far away from being a straight line. I have done this loop for combination between using modulo, rand() parameters, different seeds, running it 10, 1k times, etc... Over 4GB of output data was processed (now let someone show me anyone who thinks that SSD is just a fancy gadget). I may elaborate the results more and then post them on demand, but there are two lessons learned: rand() is not so random than I thought, and if something seems easy - it's definetely not. –  Lemurr Apr 1 '13 at 21:22
    
@PabloLemurr: No, as stated elsewhere in this Q/A-thread, rand() is not a good choice if you need high-quality randomness =) I'm no expert on pseudo-random number generators (trying to learn as much as I can, though) but the random C++ library does seem to have a lot of good choices - and it gives enough to start with for further investigations. And oh, Google Scholar is also your friend =) –  Tomas Lycken Apr 1 '13 at 23:12

Sounds like you're hitting modulo bias.

Scaling your random numbers to a range by using % is not a good idea. It's just about passable if your reducing it to a range that is a power of 2, but still pretty poor. It is primarily influenced by the smaller bits which are frequently less random with many algorithms (and rand() in particular), and it contracts to the smaller range in a non-uniform fashion because the range your reducing to will not equally divide the range of your random number generator. To reduce the range you should be using a division and loop, like so:

// generate a number from 0 to range-1
int divisor = MAX_RAND/(range+1);
int result;
do
{
    result = rand()/divisor;
} while (result >= range);

This is not as inefficient as it looks because the loop is nearly always passed through only once. Also if you're ever going to use your generator for numbers that approach MAX_RAND you'll need a more complex equation for divisor which I can't remember off-hand.

Also, rand() is a very poor random number generator, consider using something like a Mersenne Twister if you care about the quality of your results.

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You need to call srand() first and give it the time for parameter for better pseudorandom values.

Example:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <vector>
#include "stdlib.h"
#include "time.h"

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    srand(time(0));
    int x,i;
    for (i=0; i<10; i++) {
        x = rand() % 20 + 1;
        cout << x << ", ";
    }
    system("pause");
    return 0;
}

If you don't want any of the generated numbers to repeat and memory isn't a concern you can use a vector of ints, shuffle it randomly and then get the values of the first N ints.

Example:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    //Get 5 random numbers between 1 and 20
    vector<int> v;
    for(int i=1; i<=20; i++)
        v.push_back(i);
    random_shuffle(v.begin(),v.end());
    for(int i=0; i<5; i++)
        cout << v[i] << endl;
    system("pause");
    return 0;
}
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1  
Actually, seeding is irrelevant here. Not calling srand() at all is equivalent to calling srand(1), which will give the same output between different runs, but it will be no less random within the same run of the program than seeding with any other number. –  Tomas Lycken Mar 31 '13 at 20:50
    
Well, it will give the same values every run so that`s why I suggested using time for seeding. –  Johnny Mnemonic Mar 31 '13 at 20:57
1  
Sure - but that's not the problem the OP is talking about :P The question is about why the same pseudo-random number series has so low variation. Seeding has nothing to do with that. –  Tomas Lycken Mar 31 '13 at 20:58
    
You are right, I`ve made an edit. I hope this answers the OP's question. :) –  Johnny Mnemonic Mar 31 '13 at 21:18

The likely problems are that you are using the same "random" numbers each time and that any int mod 1 is zero. In other words (myInt % 1 == 0) is always true. Instead of %1, use % theBiggestNumberDesired.

Also, seed your random numbers with srand. Use a constant seed to verify that you are getting good results. Then change the seed to make sure you are still getting good results. Then use a more random seed like the clock to teat further. Release with the random seed.

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Actually, seeding is irrelevant here. Not calling srand() at all is equivalent to calling srand(1), which will give the same output between different runs, but it will be no less random within the same run of the program than seeding with any other number. –  Tomas Lycken Mar 31 '13 at 20:48
    
Actually, seeding is relevant. The SO noticed an unexpected pattern when the default seed was used. Using a different seed allows you to check if any patterns that you are seeing are by random chance or actually due to a systemic bias. –  Jeff Wolski Mar 31 '13 at 21:43
    
Well, seeding might be relevant as a means of troubleshooting, but it does not explain the pattern, and it does not "make sure that you are getting good results" - the results will be just as good (or bad) without calling srand(), but it might be easier to find out why they're bad if you do... –  Tomas Lycken Mar 31 '13 at 22:30
    
It helps you verify your results. –  Jeff Wolski Apr 1 '13 at 0:37

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