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I'm having problem with returning string outside function. Is there some sort of convertion that should be done before ?

I'm using public const int val_int[ ] and const char* val_rom[ ] outside class.

And inside class:

private:
    char* roman;

public:
    char arab2rzym(int arabic) throw (RzymArabException){
        if( arabic < 0){
            throw RzymArabException(arabic + " is too small");
        }
        else if(arabic > 3999){
            throw new RzymArabException(arabic + " is too big");
        }
        std::string roman;

        for(int i=12; i>=0; i--){
            while(arabic>=val_int[i]){
                roman.append(val_int[i]);
                arabic-=val_int[i];
            }
        }
        return roman;

    }
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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Would it be possible for you to change signature of the method to:

std::string arab2rzym(int arabic)

if so, you can work with the string where you actually need it.

Anyway, I suggest you look into std::string reference, especially operator[] and method c_str().

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Logically, a char is something like 'a' or '1', whereas a string would be "a11a". If you expect this to work, what do you expect it to do? What would the char corresponding to "a11a" be? So, a single char corresponding to an array of chars?

To answer the question - you get the error because you can't convert a string to a char. How you fix it depend entirely on what you want to accomplish - most likely you don't want to return a char, but a string.

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Actually yes, I want to return whole string. –  wojteo Mar 31 '13 at 20:44
    
@wojteo so then, why did you attempt to return a char in the first place? –  Luchian Grigore Mar 31 '13 at 21:01
    
Because I'm a beggining programmer... My idea was to return char[] –  wojteo Mar 31 '13 at 21:03
    
@wojteo if you're just staring with C++, do so with a book. –  Luchian Grigore Mar 31 '13 at 21:44

I think you should change the signature of the method to:

std::string arab2rzym(int arabic)

Also, you are shadowing the private char *roman class variable with the std::string definition in your method, I don't know whether that's the intention here?

By the way, declaring which exceptions a method throws is generally not a good idea in c++, as if you later modify the code to throw a different exception, and forget to update the "throws" declaration then it calls the default unexpected exception handler which terminates the program. One convention is to write the throws declaration at the end of the method definition but then comment it out. That way people using your method know what it throws, but your program wont fall over if you forget to update the definition with the declaration.

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if you insist on return char, there are two solution to do that

first, declare a private std::string variable and return it through c_str

private :
   std::string roman;

char const* arab2rzym(int arabic){
        if( arabic < 0){                
            throw RzymArabException(std::to_string(arabic) + " is too small");
        }
        else if(arabic > 3999){
            throw new RzymArabException(std::to_string(arabic) + " is too big");
        }        

        roman.clear();
        for(int i=12; i>=0; i--){
            while(arabic>=val_int[i]){
                roman.append(val_int[i]);
                arabic-=val_int[i];
            }
        }
        return roman.c_str();

    }

second, declare roman as static variable

    char const* arab2rzym(int arabic){
    if( arabic < 0){
        throw RzymArabException(std::to_string(arabic) + " is too small");
    }
    else if(arabic > 3999){
        throw new RzymArabException(std::to_string(arabic) + " is too big");
    }
    static std::string roman;
    roman.clear();

    for(int i=12; i>=0; i--){
        while(arabic>=val_int[i]){
            roman.append(val_int[i]);
            arabic-=val_int[i];
        }
    }
    return roman.c_str();

}

last thing to mention, I don't think RzymArabException(arabic + " is too big"); could do what you want, you should transform arabic to string before you do that

if your compiler support c++11

RzymArabException(std::to_string(arabic) + " is too big");

if not

RzymArabException((char)(((int)'0')+arabic) + std::string("is too big"));

better use reinterpret_cast to cast it

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