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Here is my regex so far

/^((((0?[1-9]|[12]\d|3[01])[\-\/](0?[13578]|1[02])[\-\/]((1[6-9]|[2-9]\d)?\d{2}))|((0?[1-9]|[12]\d|30)[\-\/](0?[13456789]|1[012])[\-\/]((1[6-9]|[2-9]\d)?\d{2}))|((0?[1-9]|1\d|2[0-8])[\-\/]0?2[\-\/]((1[6-9]|[2-9]\d)?\d{2}))|(29[\-\/]0?2[\-\/]((1[6-9]|[2-9]\d)?(0[48]|[2468][048]|[13579][26])|((16|[2468][048]|[3579][26])00)|00)))|(((0[1-9]|[12]\d|3[01])(0[13578]|1[02])((1[6-9]|[2-9]\d)?\d{2}))|((0[1-9]|[12]\d|30)(0[13456789]|1[012])((1[6-9]|[2-9]\d)?\d{2}))|((0[1-9]|1\d|2[0-8])02((1[6-9]|[2-9]\d)?\d{2}))|(2902((1[6-9]|[2-9]\d)?(0[48]|[2468][048]|[13579][26])|((16|[2468][048]|[3579][26])00)|00))))$/i

It does date validation perfectly including leap years, but the format it accepts is dd-mm-yyyy and I want mm-dd-yyyy. Also it accepts two digits for the year which I don't want.

share|improve this question
1  
Err... I really doubt that a regex is the way to go for validating dates with support for leap years... – thejh Mar 31 '13 at 21:14
    
What's the 2902 doing in there? – thejh Mar 31 '13 at 21:19
    
To be honest I got this from a friend. It does work though, I have tested it out. – SoxFan9298 Mar 31 '13 at 21:22
1  
Please tell your friend that his regex skills are cool. :) – thejh Mar 31 '13 at 21:23
3  
You can do anything in any language. That doesn't mean you should. This is a great example of a bad idea. Every language has a way of parsing dates - use what's there. – Bohemian Mar 31 '13 at 21:38
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Wow. I really doubt that a regex is the way to go here... but well, let's try it.

First reformat the regex to be more readable. As you can see, it consists of many alternatives. Add comments:

/^
 (
  (
   ((0?[1-9]|[12]\d|3[01])-/-/)    # dd-/-/
   |
   ((0?[1-9]|[12]\d|30)-/-/)       # dd-/-/ (uh, this seems redundant?)
   |
   ((0?[1-9]|1\d|2[0-8])[-/]0?2-/) # dd-/-/ (february)
   |
   (29[-/]0?2-/)
  )
  |
  (
   (
    (0[1-9]|[12]\d|3[01])     # day
    (0[13578]|1[02])          # month
    ((1[6-9]|[2-9]\d)?\d{2})  # year
   )
   |
   (
    (0[1-9]|[12]\d|30)        # day
    (0[13456789]|1[012])      # month
    ((1[6-9]|[2-9]\d)?\d{2})  # year
   )
   |
   (
    (0[1-9]|1\d|2[0-8])       # day
    02                        # month
    ((1[6-9]|[2-9]\d)?\d{2})  # year
   )
   |
   (
    2902                      # day and month
    (                         # year in which there's a 29-02-xxxx
     (1[6-9]|[2-9]\d)?
     (0[48]|[2468][048]|[13579][26])
     |
     ((16|[2468][048]|[3579][26])00)
     |
     00
    )
   )
  )
 )
$/i

Next, reorder the regex to change it from ddmmyyyy to mmddyyyy:

/^
 (
  (
   (-/(0?[1-9]|[12]\d|3[01])-/)    # -/dd-/
   |
   (-/(0?[1-9]|[12]\d|30)-/)       # -/dd-/ (uh, this seems redundant?)
   |
   ([-/]0?2(0?[1-9]|1\d|2[0-8])-/) # -/dd-/ (february) (I don't really get this one...)
   |
   ([-/]0?229-/) # really confused... what kind of date format is this?
  )
  |
  (
   (
    (0[13578]|1[02])          # month
    (0[1-9]|[12]\d|3[01])     # day
    ((1[6-9]|[2-9]\d)?\d{2})  # year
   )
   |
   (
    (0[13456789]|1[012])      # month
    (0[1-9]|[12]\d|30)        # day
    ((1[6-9]|[2-9]\d)?\d{2})  # year
   )
   |
   (
    02                        # month
    (0[1-9]|1\d|2[0-8])       # day
    ((1[6-9]|[2-9]\d)?\d{2})  # year
   )
   |
   (
    0229                      # day and month
    (                         # year in which there's a 29-02-xxxx
     (1[6-9]|[2-9]\d)?
     (0[48]|[2468][048]|[13579][26])
     |
     ((16|[2468][048]|[3579][26])00)
     |
     00
    )
   )
  )
 )
$/i

Please note that I am thoroughly confused by the date formats containing -/ and therefore maybe was unable to rewrite them correctly.

And then put it in your code. And if you don't want someone to die from a lethal dose of unreadable regex, keep the comments (if your programming language allows this).

share|improve this answer
    
This is great thank you so much. My problem was that I couldn't read it well either....ahah but the -/ you are concerned with is actually \-\/ which allows either - or / – SoxFan9298 Mar 31 '13 at 21:41
    
Hey, I tried to put this onto my page without the comments but it doesn't work. Part of the code is commented out for some reason. I also tried to enter in the code piece by piece but to no avail. Any ideas? – SoxFan9298 Mar 31 '13 at 23:08
    
@SoxFan9298 Did you put the backslashes and other stuff back in that were missing in your original post because it wasn't formatted as code? – thejh Apr 1 '13 at 12:48
    
Sorry for not noticing that the regex was rendered garbled when you first posted, but if you take the correct regex and redo this (break it up into multiple lines and add comments, then reorder it), it should be easy to do. I'm kind of lazy right now. – thejh Apr 1 '13 at 12:55

The easiest way to develop a complex regex from examples is to use the regular expression generator at http://txt2re.com

share|improve this answer
    
Too bad someone downvoted this one. The free web service offers direct support complex date regexes; it gives worked-out examples with tests; and it allows experimentation with alternative formulations. In short, it is the easiest way to attack a regex problem of this complexity. – Raymond Hettinger Mar 31 '13 at 21:53
1  
I did try this site and entered in my format but the responses weren't what I was looking for. Sorry about the downvote, it wasn't me. – SoxFan9298 Mar 31 '13 at 22:09
    
+1 for the link. Doesn't solve this specific problem, but really useful for real-life programming ) – Alex Shesterov Mar 31 '13 at 22:16
    
Sorry for the downvote. I voted before actually trying it because I didn't think that there would be special-case code in that service for handling dates. Now my vote is locked in. :( – thejh Mar 31 '13 at 22:43
    
@thejh You can change it now :-) – Raymond Hettinger Mar 31 '13 at 23:07

// you may vote down or flag this as "not an answer", but i can't resist posting this...

Omg, why are you hating yourself so much?

Regular expressions is a powerful and useful tool, but it can't solve every problem in this world. Over and over again, I see attempts of parsing dates like this - respecting leap years, or to parse XML/HTML with regex.

This is just wrong.

Your regular expression is unreadable, and unmaintainable (which you have proven by this question). It may be good to construct such monster-regexps as an exercise, but you should not even think of using it in production environment.

The reasons are (to name a few!):

  • Correctness: you are not sure this even works. You will spend hours on analyzing and testing it.

  • Performance: A regular expression of such size may take a long time to execute.

  • Error output: a regular expression gives you just the "matches / does not match" result. You have no chance to tell the user whether the date he entered is syntactically invalid or February 29th does not exist in this year.

Learn to choose a right tool for a specific purpose. A universal "I-can-do-everything-good" tool does not exist.

share|improve this answer
    
Dont worry I am not gonna flag or vote down. I appreciate the insight and, like I said, I am bad at this. But, besides just telling me whats wrong, what would you suggest? – SoxFan9298 Mar 31 '13 at 22:02
    
I suggest you accept the thejh's answer :) – Alex Shesterov Mar 31 '13 at 22:29
    
"You have no chance to tell the user whether the date he entered is syntactically invalid or February 29th does not exist in this year." Wrong, the regex actually takes care of leap years. Didn't you read the whole question? :D "It does date validation perfectly including leap years" – thejh Mar 31 '13 at 22:40
    
@thejh: no, I've meant - the result of evaluating the expression is a boolean. So you get "the date is fully ok" or "something wrong" - as opposed to "date format invalid"/"date invalid with respect to leap years"/"date ok". – Alex Shesterov Mar 31 '13 at 22:49
    
@alex-shesterov Ah, ok, right. – thejh Mar 31 '13 at 22:50

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