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I am trying to calculate the total time user logged into the database using a trigger my table structure is seen below:

create table stats$user_log
(
   user_id           varchar2(30),
   session_id           number(8),
   host              varchar2(30),
   logon_day                 date,
   logon_time        varchar2(10),
   logoff_day                date,
   logoff_time       varchar2(10),
   elapsed_minutes       varchar2(32)
);

My trigger for logon is as follows:

create or replace trigger
   logon_audit_trigger
AFTER LOGON ON DATABASE
BEGIN
insert into stats$user_log values(
   user,
   sys_context('USERENV','SESSIONID'),
   sys_context('USERENV','HOST'),
   sysdate,
   to_char(sysdate, 'hh24:mi:ss'),
   null,
   null,
   null
);
END;
/

My trigger for logoff is as follows:

create or replace trigger
   logoff_audit_trigger
BEFORE LOGOFF ON DATABASE
BEGIN
UPDATE
    stats$user_log
set

      logoff_day = sysdate,
      logoff_time = to_char(sysdate, 'hh24:mi:ss'),
      elapsed_minutes = round((logoff_day - logon_day)*1440,2)

  WHERE
   sys_context('USERENV','SESSIONID') = session_id;
END;
/

When the user logs out everything is captured except the elapse_minutes column it remains as null.

Can anyone tell me where i'm going wrong please and thanks

share|improve this question
    
Why are you storing the time seperately in a varchar2 field, when it's included in the date fields anyway? Can't see how that's ever going to be useful. Or even really why you're storing the elapsed time, since that can be calculated when needed, including as a virtual column in 11g. – Alex Poole Mar 31 '13 at 22:24

At the time you do the update, the logoff_day you refer to in the right-hand side of the set expression is still null, so the expression evaluates to null.

Any column values you refer to have to be the pre-update values, or changing the order that the columns are assigned within the set clause would change how the update worked, which at best be confusing. An update that sets a column based on its old value - e.g. set salary = salary * 1.1 - would be particularly problematic.

You can refer to sysdate a second time instead:

  logoff_day = sysdate,
  logoff_time = to_char(sysdate, 'hh24:mi:ss'),
  elapsed_minutes = round((sysdate - logon_day)*1440,2)
share|improve this answer

If session auditing is enabled, the database already does this for you. Why create that for yourself? Check dba_audit_session for the results. You might need to talk to your dba / security staff to get access but it might be worth it.

share|improve this answer

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