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I think I understand why variables exist outside of the function they were declared in, because you're returning another function:

myFunction = function() {
    var closure = 'closure scope'
    return function() {
        return closure;
    }
}
A = myFunction(); // myFunction returns a function, not a value
B = A(); // A is a function, which when run, returns:
console.log(B); // 'closure scope'

The way that it's written now, calling A() is like a getter.

Q: How can I write myFunction so that calling A(123) is a setter?

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Saying "not a value" is a little misleading; a function is a value. –  icktoofay Apr 1 '13 at 0:07

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Try the following:

myFunction = function() {
    var closure = 'closure scope'

    // value is optional
    return function(value) {
        // if it will be omitted
        if(arguments.length == 0) {
            // the method is a getter
            return closure;
        } else {
            // otherwise a setter
            closure = value;
            // with fluid interface ;)
            return this;
        }
    }
}
A = myFunction(); // myFunction returns a function, not a value
A(123); // set value
B = A(); // A is a function, which when run, returns:
console.log(B); // '123'
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Thanks Thorsten! I didn't think about using the length property to determine if there was an argument or not. This is good. –  Phillip Mar 31 '13 at 23:52
    
Using it you can set the property to null or false as well. For a long time I've not really coded js but remembered there is something :) –  hek2mgl Mar 31 '13 at 23:54

You could do something like this if you want both getter and setter for example:

var func = function() {
  var closure = 'foo';

  return {
    get: function() { return closure; },
    set: function(value) { closure = value; }
  }
};

var A = func();

A.set('foobar');
console.log(A.get()); //=> "foobar"
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Thanks elclanrs. I looked at JavaScript getters and setters, but I think I want to use jQuery style getters and setters where calling the function without parameters is considered a getter and calling it with a parameter is considered a setter. –  Phillip Mar 31 '13 at 23:51

Should be as simple as:

myFunction = function() {
    var closure = 'closure scope'
    return function(setTo) {
        if (typeof setTo !== "undefined") {
            closure = setTo;
            return this; //support call chaining, good idea hek2mgl
        } else {
            return closure;
        }
    }
}

Since the closure variable is within the closure of the function's scope, you should be able to assign to it the same way you can read from it.

See jsFiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/WF4VT/1/

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What if setTo is 0? ;) –  Felix Kling Mar 31 '13 at 23:53
    
@FelixKling good point, guess I was being too lazy! Updated. –  metadept Mar 31 '13 at 23:58

Another alternative would be to use a class and define getters and setters:

function MyClass(p){
    this._prop = p;
}
MyClass.prototype = {
    constructor: MyClass,
    get prop(){
        return this._prop;
    },
    set prop(p){
        this._prop = p;
    }
}

var myObject = new MyClass("TEST");
console.log(myObject.prop);
myObject.prop = "test";
console.log(myObject.prop);

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/louisbros/bMkbE/

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jsFiddle Demo

Have your returned function accept an argument. Use it as a setter:

myFunction = function() {
 var closure = 'closure scope';
 return function(val) {
    closure = val;
    return closure;
 }
}
A = myFunction(); // myFunction returns a function, not a value
B = A(123); // A is a function, which when run, returns:
console.log(B); // 'closure scope'
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