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i made a simple sorting program in which i initialized array like below.

int a[]={9,4,7,8,5,2,6,1,0,3};

but my sorting function sorts array a[0] to a[7] and treats 0 like '\0' and stops. if i put 0 at some other place it is sorting just up to 0 and ignores rest of the array. Is C is treating 0 and '\0' same here?

My Bubble Sort Program is as below.

#include<stdio.h>
#include<conio.h>

int main()
{
int a[]={9,4,7,8,5,2,6,1,0,3};

void bubble_sort(int *a);
void print(int *a);

bubble_sort(a);

print(a);

getch();

return 0;
}

void bubble_sort(int *a)
{
int i=0,j,t,n;
for(i=0;a[i]!='\0';i++)
{
    n=0;
    for(j=1;a[j]!='\0';j++)
    {
        if(a[j-1]>a[j])
        {
            t=a[j-1];
            a[j-1]=a[j];
            a[j]=t;
            n++;
        }
    }
    if(n==0)
    {
         break;
    }
}
}

void print(int a[])
{
int i=0;

for(i=0;a[i]!='\0';i++)
{
    printf("%d ",a[i]);
}

printf("\n");
}
share|improve this question
1  
I wonder whether its a good idea to write function prototypes inside main function... –  Recker Apr 1 '13 at 4:04
    
pass the length of the array to bubble_sort. no guarantee array will end in `\0' (=0). –  gongzhitaao Apr 1 '13 at 4:06
    
"Is C is treating 0 and '\0' same here?" -- By definition. '\0' only conventionally signals the end of an array of char ... it isn't some sort of generic end-of-array sentinel. –  Jim Balter Apr 1 '13 at 4:16

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

'\0' is 0 by definition. You need to pass the length of your array to your sorting function, or else choose a different integer value as a terminator and make sure you never use that value for anything else.

share|improve this answer

The character '\0' is exactly equal to 0. You will want to pass an array length into your sorting algorithm, then use that.

share|improve this answer
    
Huh, beaten by 50 seconds, with (almost) exactly the same answer. –  lxop Apr 1 '13 at 4:04

'\0' is NULL character.ASCII code of NULL Character is 0.

a[i]!='\0' is equivalent to a[i]!=0

since '\0' is type casted to its ASCII value(Integer).

Thus the loop stops when ever current element is zero.

In order to fix it,pass an extra argument : array size

bubble_sort(a,sizeof(a)/sizeof(int));
print(a,sizeof(a)/sizeof(int));

Change the bubble_sort function to:

void bubble_sort(int *a,int sz)
{
    int i=0,j,t,n;
    for(i=0;i<sz;i++)
    {
        n=0;
        for(j=1;j<sz;j++)
        {
        ...................................

Change the print function to:

void print(int a[],int sz)
{
    int i=0;
    for(i=0;i<sz;i++)
    {
                 .......................

Please note:

in C++ it is nearly impossible to calculate the size of array from decaying pointer(int *a or int a[]). Therefore, always an extra argument : size of array is passed along with array.

However, whenever character array is passed to a function, simply iterating the array until NULL character is encountered works as in C/C++, a string of characters is stored in successive elements of a character array and terminated by the NULL character.

share|improve this answer

Is C is treating 0 and '\0' same here?

Yes. It's because both are zero. As others mentioned,or you pass the length of your array to function or use chose another delimiter for your array where you need to ensure that it will not contains in your array.

EDIT: @Jim Balter,thanks for clarification.

share|improve this answer
    
That '\0' == 0 doesn't have anything to do with the fact that numbers beginning with 0 are in octal, and there is no \O notation in C. –  Jim Balter Apr 1 '13 at 4:20
    
@JimBalter: I mean \0,sorry. –  Jack Apr 1 '13 at 4:21
    
@Jim Balter: What if C handle 0 as decimal base will 0 == \0 be true? –  Jack Apr 1 '13 at 4:23
    
Of course it would; 0 is 0 in any base. '\0' is a char constant with value 0, and char constants in C (not C++) have type int, so it not only equals 0 but it has the same type. –  Jim Balter Apr 1 '13 at 4:23
    
@JimBalter:Ok,I edited ans. Thanks :) –  Jack Apr 1 '13 at 4:28

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