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I'm a Backbone, Javascript, jQuery noob and trying to figure things out. In my Backbone view, I have this method:

    setError: function (selection, text) {
        console.log("set error");
        this.$el.find(selection).html(text);
        this.$el.find(selection).show();
    },

I want to call this method, from another method that populates the error field, and also append other messages in the div. So I try calling setError like this:

     populateErrors: function (sampleErrors) {
       console.log("populateErrors");
        _.each(sampleErrors, function (sample) {
            // Set the error
            this.setError('#sample-error', 'test');
            $('#sample-validation-form').append('<p>testing</p>');
        }, this);
    }

What I don't understand is how to call setError. So If I call it outside of the _.each statement, I can do this.setError. That makes sense to me since I'm calling setError with this Backbone object. At least that's how I'm interpreting it. Please let me know if that is incorrect.

But then in the _.each statement, I thought since I am binding the statement with this as the last parameter, I thought I would not need this in front of setError. But when I try that, I get setError is undefined. So then I try this.setError as seen above, but I do not get my 'test' output like I do when I call this.setError outside of the _.each loop. Can someone please explain to me how this function context works in this example. I'm thoroughly confused! thanks in advance!

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You say this code is form a model, but it seems to be a view's code (a view has a property $el, not a model). As for each, when you pass an object foo as the third argument, you are saying: within the anonymous function, this should be foo. So yes, you need to use this.setError. You are sure it works outside the each statement? –  Paul Hoenecke Apr 1 '13 at 5:04
    
@PaulHoenecke Oh right, sorry, yes I meant view! –  Crystal Apr 1 '13 at 15:05
    
@PaulHoenecke Can you put your description of how the each,this statement work. I relooked at my setError and it does work afterall. But your description helped me understand it as well and I'd like to mark the question closed. Thanks! –  Crystal Apr 1 '13 at 15:11
    
What is sampleErrors, did you call the loop on an empty array maybe? It would be nice if you could show us your invocation of populateErrors on the sample instance. –  Bergi Apr 1 '13 at 15:12
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

When you pass an object foo as the third argument, you are saying: within the anonymous function, this should be foo.

populateErrors: function (sampleErrors) {
    // `this` is the Backbone view here
    this.setError('#sample-error', 'test');

    _.each(sampleErrors, function (sample) {
        // since you passed the view (this) to `each`
        // `this` is the Backbone view here also
        this.setError('#sample-error', 'test');
    }, this);
}
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The third parameter to _.each is the context. The context of the javascript function is the reference to what "this" will be in the function. By passing "this", you get to keep your current context.

For Example:

populateErrors: function (sampleErrors) {
   var x = {
          blah: "x context"
       };

   this.blah = "orig context";

   console.log("populateErrors");

    _.each(sampleErrors, function (sample) {
        // Here, your current context is the same context as 
        // when you called populate Errors
        // this.blah === "orig context";
    }, this);

    _.each(sampleErrors, function (sample) {
        // Here, you've defined a different context.
        // this.blah === "x context";
    }, x);
}

The only time you can avoid using "this." in front of your expression is when you use the "with" key word. See https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/JavaScript/Reference/Statements/with

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