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I am unsure what I am doing wrong; or why this is the case.

I've the following code:

class Expression (Node):
  """
  ...
  """

  def __init__ (self):
    self.__expressionType = None


  def expressionType (self):
    return self.__expressionType


class Number (Expression):
  """
  Number .
  """

  def __init__ (self, value):
    """
    Value is an entry of type Constant.
    """
    Expression.__init__(self)
    assert isinstance (value, KST.Constant)
    self.__constant = value
    self.__expressionType = value.elementType()

For a number object say n = Number(KST.Constant(..)), I am always returned None for the following statement—

 n.expressionType()

Now if I change the double underscores to single ones, it all works. I understand the difference between private and semi-private variables but why this is happening — I've no idea. Also, I've used "__" in a number of other places and it all seems to work fine.

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this would work if you defined expressionType on Number as well. but from code-duplication perspective, you would want to use a single underscore. –  dnozay Apr 1 '13 at 5:45

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Attribute names with double underscores are "mangled" to make it harder to have conflicting name in subclasses.

So use single underscores.

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I got it. I understood the issue. What I now do is — Expression.__init__(self, value.elementType()). Do you think this is a better way of doing it? Obviously, I've added the expressionType to the constructor of Expression. –  p0lAris Apr 1 '13 at 5:33
    
@flippex17_ Yes, call it element_type(). python.org/dev/peps/pep-0008 ;-) –  Lennart Regebro Apr 1 '13 at 5:35
    
I am sorry I didn't get that. My question was— 'should I use a single underscore or end up changing the way I call the constructor for the super class'? I am not concerned with variable naming as I use the Camel naming convention. –  p0lAris Apr 1 '13 at 5:38
    
Yes, use single underscores. I think my answer was perfectly clear in that and very hard to misunderstand. –  Lennart Regebro Apr 1 '13 at 5:42

This is because name mangling is happening.

  • expressionType is defined in Expression.
  • n.__expressionType will translate to n._Expression__expressionType.
  • if you copy-paste the same expressionType method to the class Number, then because of method resolution order, it would go the the definition that appears in Number where self.__expressionType would mean self._Number__expressionType.

n._Expression__expressionType != n._Number__expressionType.

This would actually work:

class Expression(Node):
  def __init__(self):
    self.__expressionType = None
  def expressionType(self):
    return self.__expressionType

class Number(Expression):
  def __init__ (self, value):
    Expression.__init__(self)
    assert isinstance (value, KST.Constant)
    self.__constant = value
    self.__expressionType = value.elementType()
  def expressionType (self):
    return self.__expressionType

However, there is code duplication, so using a single underscore is better because it won't mangle the name of the attribute.

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As the others have pointed out, "namemangling" occurs. But what the hell is that? Let's see with an example.

Create an instance of A:

class A():
  var1=10
  __var2=20

a=A()

Access the first variable of A:

>>> a.var1
10

Access the second variable of A:

>>> a.__var2
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
AttributeError: A instance has no attribute '__var2'

Notice the error A instance has no attribute '__var2'. However you can can access it fine with:

>>> a._A__var2
20

So simply put, whenever you have two doublescores (or more) infront of a method or a variable, Python changes the name of that method or variable by appending an underscore and the classname to it. This a sort of trick so programmers don't screw up things by mistakenly changing values.

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