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I have a sentence which needs to replaced after certain modifications.

However, the sentence does not replace in my original file as it contains round brackets. How do i make sure it replaces because the presence of round brackets is not always necessary in a sentence.

eg. $table=~s/<table-wrap-foot>($foot1)<\/table-wrap-foot>/$foot/sg; Here, the $foot may or may not have round brackets present. I have even tried using \Q$foot\E, but it fails to work.!!

Any help would be appreciated

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Round brackets? Do you mean parentheses? –  doublesharp Apr 1 '13 at 5:36
    
Yes!! I mean parantheses... –  Nikita Apr 1 '13 at 5:49
    
Infamous perldoc.perl.org/functions/quotemeta.html might also help here. –  Dfr Mar 28 at 11:44
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5 Answers 5

Couldnt find a way out.. so did a trick.. Replaced the parantheses with self-made entities before starting to manipulate the file and later replaced it with the same before printing the results to the file back...

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Trying to do this via regular expressions for arbitrary inputs will lead to madness. Using XML::Twig:

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use 5.012;
use strict;
use warnings;

use XML::Twig;

my $xml = <<EO_XML;
<table-wrap-foot>
translocations or inversions: t(8;21), inv(16) or
t(16;16), t(15;17), t(9;11), t(v;11)(v;q23),
t(6;9), inv(3) or t(3;3)
</table-wrap-foot>
EO_XML

my $t = XML::Twig->new;
$t->parse($xml);

say $t->root->first_child_text;
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If you want to have parens in your search value, you need to escape the backslash that escapes the paren. Parentheses in your replacement will not be an issue, but it will be in the matching as they are used for grouping in regex.

Assuming you have a value assigned to $table you want to only pass the text you want to search for and replace.

The following example will replace (hello) with hi in the string <table-wrap-foot>(hello)</table-wrap-foot>:

#!/usr/bin/perl

$foot = "(hello)";
print $foot . "\n";                     # $foot = (hello)
# replace all ( and ) with \( and \)
$foot =~ s/(\(|\))/\\$1/sg;             # $foot = \(hello\)
print $foot . "\n";

# replace with "hi"
$table = "<table-wrap-foot>(hello)</table-wrap-foot>";
print $table . "\n";
$table =~ s/<table-wrap-foot>($foot)</table-wrap-foot>/hi/sg;
print $table;

Outputs:

> perl test.pl 
(hello)
\(hello\)
<table-wrap-foot>(hello)</table-wrap-foot>
hi
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I dont know how may times a parens may appear in the search value. How do i handle this? –  Nikita Apr 1 '13 at 6:07
    
You will need to replace them in your example to escape them, I updated the example. –  doublesharp Apr 1 '13 at 6:12
    
It's a bit different to replace the parens in a variable rather than doing it all inline. In both cases you want to end up with \( or \) but if you are doing it with a variable you escape once, so \\( for example, but inline you need to double escape, like \\\( –  doublesharp Apr 1 '13 at 6:16
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In regular expressions, ( and ) are special characters (used for grouping). To match them literally, escape them like \( and \).

To optionally match something, use the ? quantifier.

So your regular expression becomes:

$table=~s/<table-wrap-foot>\(?$foot1\)?<\/table-wrap-foot>/$foot/sg;

Or with extended syntax, for more readability:

$table =~ s{
  <table-wrap-foot>      # beginning marker
  \(?                    # optional opening paren
  $foot1                 # the original sentence
  \)?                    # optional clonsing paren
  </table-wrap-foot>     # closing marker
}{$foot}xsg;

Note that the x at the end of the regex means you can use comments in your expression, and normal whitespace is ignored (use \s or [ ] to match it). Also, if you use s{}{} as delimiters, you don't need to escape the / in the closing marker anymore.

More at perldoc perlop : Regexp Quote-Like Operators.

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$foot here is sumthing like this translocations or inversions: t(8;21), inv(16) or t(16;16), t(15;17), t(9;11), t(v;11)(v;q23), t(6;9), inv(3) or t(3;3) and i'm not sure of how many times a parantheses may appear –  Nikita Apr 1 '13 at 6:04
    
Ah, then matching \Q$foot1\E should work – I thought from the variable name that you had tried it in the right hand side of the substitution. –  Ben Deutsch Apr 1 '13 at 6:10
    
It doesnt work for me! –  Nikita Apr 1 '13 at 7:27
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Try this:

$table=~s/<table-wrap-foot>[\(]*$foot1[\)]*<\/table-wrap-foot>/$foot/sg;

That way you treat parenthesis as plain characters and you ask for 0 or 1 coincidences of them.

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Thanks! But it dint work for me.. My sentence in $foot is sumthing like this translocations or inversions: t(8;21), inv(16) or t(16;16), t(15;17), t(9;11), t(v;11)(v;q23), t(6;9), inv(3) or t(3;3) –  Nikita Apr 1 '13 at 6:00
    
Ok. Please give me a more detailed example. What is an example of the original string, what would you like to capture there and what do you want to replace it with. Since you're just giving us $foot1 and $foot, we cannot see what's behind that. –  Francisco Zarabozo Apr 1 '13 at 6:57
    
$foot1 = translocations or inversions: t(8;21), inv(16) or t(16;16), t(15;17), t(9;11), t(v;11)(v;q23), t(6;9), inv(3) or t(3;3) i want to replace $foot1 to $foot which is $foot=<p>translocations or inversions: t(8;21), inv(16) or t(16;16), t(15;17), t(9;11), t(v;11)(v;q23), t(6;9), inv(3) or t(3;3) $foot is to replaced in a string which contains my entire file –  Nikita Apr 1 '13 at 7:14
2  
I think there might be a misunderstanding here. Please write here a) The original string - b) The string as you want it with a successful modification. For example, explain like this: a) Original: <table>123</table> b) After sustitution: <table>one two three</table> –  Francisco Zarabozo Apr 1 '13 at 12:32
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