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I am having a confusion regarding the following code,

#include<stdio.h>

int main()
{
 char buf[100]={'\0'};
 int data=0;
 scanf("%d",&data);
 read(stdin,buf,4);         //attaching to stdin
 printf("buffer is %s\n",buf);

 return 1;
 }

suppose on runtime I provided with the input 10abcd so as per my understanding following should happen:

  1. scanf should place 10 in data
  2. and abcd will still be on the stdin buffer
  3. when read tries to read the stdin (already abcd is there) it should place the abcd into the buf
  4. so printf should print abcd

but it is not happening ,printf showing no o/p

am I missing something here?

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3 Answers 3

First of all read (stdin, ...) should give warnings (if you have them enabled) which you would be wise to heed. read() takes an integer as the first parameter specifying which channel to read from. stdin is of type FILE *.

Even if you changed it to read(0,..., this is not recommended practice. scanf is reading from FILE *stdin which is buffered from file handle 0. read (0, ...) reads directly from the underlying file handle and ignore any characters which were buffered. This will cause strange results unless stdin is set unbuffered.

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yes you are right even when I use with 0 instead of stdin it still gives me strange result. so is there any way to set stdin unbuffered? –  Deepak Apr 1 '13 at 6:12
1  
@Deepak: Yes there is, setvbuf (stdin, NULL, _IONBF, 0) –  wallyk Apr 1 '13 at 6:17

Ignoring mechanical issues related to the syntax of the read() function call, there are two cases to consider:

  1. Input is from a terminal.
  2. Input is from a file.

Terminal

No data will be available for reading until the user hits return. At that point, the standard I/O library will read all the available data into the buffer associated with stdin (that would be "10abcd\n"). It will then parse the number, leaving the a in the buffer to be read later by other standard I/O functions.

When the read() occurs, it will also wait for the user to provide some input. It has no clue about the data in the stdin buffer. It will hang until the user hits return, and will then read the next lot of data, returning up to 4 bytes in the buffer (no null termination unless it so happens that the fourth character is an ASCII NUL '\0').

File

Actually, this isn't all that much different, except that instead of reading a line of data into the buffer, the standard I/O library will probably read an entire buffer full, (BUFSIZ bytes, which might be 512 or larger). It will then convert the 10 and leave the a for later use. (If the file is shorter than the buffer size, it will all be read into the stdin buffer.)

The read will then collect the next 4 bytes from the file. If the whole file was read already, then it will return nothing — 0 bytes read.


You need to record and check the return value from read(). You should also check the return value from scanf() to ensure it did actually read a number.

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try... man read first.

read is declared as ssize_t read(int fd, void *buf, size_t count);

and stdin is declared as FILE *. thats the issue. use fread() instead and you will be sorted.

int main()
{
 char buf[100]={'\0'};
 int data=0;
 scanf("%d",&data);

 fread(buf, 1, 4, stdin);
 printf("buffer is %s\n",buf);

 return 1;
}

EDIT: Your understanding is almost correct but not totally. To address your question properly, i will agree with Jonathen Laffer.

how your code works,

1) scanf should place 10 in data.

2) abcd will still be on the stdin buffer when you press ENTER.

3) then read() will again wait for entry and you have to again press ENTER to run program further.

4)now if you have entered anything before pressing ENTER for 2nd time the printf should print it else you will not get anything on output other than your printf statement.

Thats why i asked you to use fread instead. hope it helps.

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instead of stdin if you specify a 0 then also the same problem comes. –  Deepak Apr 1 '13 at 6:18
1  
refer my edits.... –  Kinjal Patel Apr 1 '13 at 7:35
    
thanks a lot I got my answer now –  Deepak Apr 1 '13 at 9:49

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