Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Consider the following code, which provokes CA2104: Do not declare read only mutable reference types.

public class Test
{
    // This provokes CA2104: "Do not declare read only mutable reference types".
    protected readonly ImmutableClass ImmutableMember;
}

public class ImmutableClass
{
}

Does anyone know of a way to mark a class as immutable in a way that would suppress warning CA2104?

I tried decorating MutableClass with [ImmutableObject(true)] with no hope of success (since that attribute is pretty clearly for the Form Editor to use), and sure enough it doesn't work.

I assume that Code Analysis is using a list of known immutable types when determining whether to emit CA2104, so we can't use the same approach.

I guess that even if you could mark a class as immutable, there'd be no way for the compiler to actually check if it was true, but at least it could be a useful indicator.

Anyway, are there any attributes I'm overlooking? If not, suppression will have to do.

[EDIT] Changed "Mutable" to "Immutable" to better express my meaning.

[EDIT2]

So the answer is: There is no alternative way to do this at the moment.

I did find an interesting blog from Joe Duffy (author of "Concurrent Programming On Windows") about this kind of thing.

He starts off with "Imagine we had an ImmutableAttribute."... :)

It's quite interesting - he went to the trouble of writing some new FxCop rules to do some analysis of types attributed as immutable.


Follow Up

Using Peter Richie's suggestion, I have modified the code to look like this, which works fine for my intents and purposes:

public class Test
{
    protected ImmutableClass ImmutableMember
    {
        get
        {
            return _immutableMember;
        }
    }

    private readonly ImmutableClass _immutableMember = new ImmutableClass();
}

public class ImmutableClass
{
}
share|improve this question
    
Why mark it as readonly? –  Davin Tryon Apr 1 '13 at 8:26
    
@Davin Tryon: Because the property must be initialised in construction and thereafter never changed, just like readonly is always used. Surely the same reason as you'd mark anything readonly? –  Matthew Watson Apr 1 '13 at 8:32
    
Thought so, you just didn't mention. It looks like a one-off suppression to me. –  Davin Tryon Apr 1 '13 at 8:34
    
Yeah, looks like it. I'm not overly fussed, I just wish there was a proper attribute to express my intent. There's a [Pure] attribute for "pure" functions (for Code Contracts); you'd think Microsoft would have introduced something for Immutable. Maybe I should go and suggest it... –  Matthew Watson Apr 1 '13 at 8:39
1  
Have you tried protected ImmutableClass ImmutableMember { get; private set;} then allowed initialization of ImmutableMember only through a base constructor? –  Peter Ritchie Apr 1 '13 at 14:46

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

A protected readonly field isn't really that clear. As protected, you might expect that a derived class can initialize the field:

public class Test
{
    protected readonly ImmutableClass ImmutableMember;
}

public class SpecialTest : Test
{
    public SpecialTest() { ImmutableMember = new ImmutableClass; }
}

But, that's not the case--you will get a compile error (CS0191).

I don't know the exact impetus behind CA2104, but you can get the same result without readonly via:

public class Test
{
    protected ImmutableClass ImmutableMember {get; private set;}

    public Test()
        :this(new ImmutableClasse())
    {
    }

    public Test(ImmutableClass immutableClass)
    {
        ImmutableMember = new ImmutableClasse();
    }
}

and avoid the CA2104.

Update:

w.r.t. to the comments (and to future readers), as you say you could use a backing field to get the read-only and provide a protected getter to get at it in derived classes:

public class Test
{
    private readonly ImmutableClass immutableMember;

    protected ImmutableClass ImmutableMember { get { return immutableMember; } }

    public Test(ImmutableClass immutableMember)
    {
        this.immutableMember = immutableMember;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks - I'm thinking that the way to go with this is somewhat similar. In fact, I'll make the readonly field private and expose it to the derived classes via a protected property. I'll mark this as the answer and add the code I finally used to my original question. –  Matthew Watson Apr 1 '13 at 15:24

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.