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I'm trying to achieve an overloaded interface method. I know that this does not work in Java, but how could I rewrite the following to have the implementation type in my action() methods, and not the Base type?

class Base;
class Foo extends Base;
class Bar extends Base;

interface IService {
   void action(Base base);
}

class FooService implements IService {
   void action(Foo foo) {
     //executes specific foo action
   }
}

class BarService implements IService {
   void action(Bar bar) {
     //executes specific Bar action
   }
}

usage:

Base base; //may be foo or bar
anyService.action(bar);

You get the idea. How could I do this?

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3  
You are violating SOLID principles? –  Jayan Apr 1 '13 at 11:03
    
you are doing it right. Whats the problem you are getting? –  Azodious Apr 1 '13 at 11:04
    
No I'm not: anyService.action(bar) is telling me te change the implementation of the service that is used (FooService or BarService) to action(Base base). But I need the implementation instances there, and don't want to use typecasting. –  membersound Apr 1 '13 at 11:14
1  
Interfaces are designed to prevent such situations. –  martini Apr 1 '13 at 11:40

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Define an interface that both Foo and Bar should implement, so you can do like:

interface Actionable{
    public void action;
}

class Base;
class Foo extends Base implements Actionable;
class Bar extends Base implements Actionable;

interface IService {
   void action(Actionable a);
}

class FooService implements IService {
   void action(Actionable a) {
    ...
   }
}

class BarService implements IService {
   void action(Actionable a) {
    ...
   }
}

Anyway interfaces should make your code more robust and reusable - if you are looking into hacks to make them work, consider designing your application better.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes this shows exactly my problem: I want to have the implementation instance of my objects in the action() methods. Using it as you suggested, I'd always have to make ugly typecast in each action... –  membersound Apr 1 '13 at 11:18
    
Why do you say it's a hack??? It seems to be a perfectly reasonable solution for some scenarios?! (anyway +1) –  Lisa Anne Oct 14 '14 at 10:49

This is not supported in Java and you are violating the OOP rules.

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Well could you suggest as refactoring how the same could be achieved respecting OOP rules? –  membersound Apr 1 '13 at 11:23

Depending on your intended usage, there are multiple things to try.

If your calls to the IService know which kinds of object they can take, you could try generics.

interface IService<T extends Base> {
   void action(T foo)
}

and usage:

IService<Foo> fooService = ...
fooService.action(fooObject);

If that's not the case, you could have some check in your ´Base´ class to allow differentiation for your IService interface.

class Base {
   boolean acceptsFoo();
   boolean acceptsBar();
}

and you could use it like:

class AnyService implements IService {
   void action(Base base) {
     if (base.acceptsFoo()) {
        ((FooService) base).foo();
     }
}

However, this seems like a strange design. An interface is aimed at providing uniform access, and if you need to differentiate between the arguments, this is almost always a sign of an interface that can be split up into several parts...

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The generic approach looks promising , BUT: I want to supply the parameter to the action() as a Base type, like coming from List<Base> that contains both Foos and Bars. If I just call fooService.action(list.get(0)) I will get an error that action(T) should be changed to action(Base), or that I must supply a Foo object directly. But as I do not know if the object coming from the list is a Foo object, I'd first again would have to use instanceof check. Vicious circle... –  membersound Apr 1 '13 at 11:23

You can always typecast to a specific type to execute that action.

void action(Base base) 
{
    if(base instanceof Foo)
    {
         Foo foo = (Foo) base;
         //executes specific foo action
    }
    else
    {
        // handle the edge case where the wrong type was sent to you
    } 
}
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1  
This is far from ideal - more of a hack than a solution. –  Boris the Spider Apr 1 '13 at 11:06
    
The way the interface is right now, I dont see any other solution. The impl must implement "public void action(Base base)". There is no way around it. If foo / bar specific information is necessary on the impl, you will need to reconsider the interface itself. –  Deepak Bala Apr 1 '13 at 11:10
    
Indeed - generics for example. –  Boris the Spider Apr 1 '13 at 11:11

any way if you are passing objects of sub class

then behavior (instance methods) will be called of object(subclass) passed(polymorphism)

ie.overloaded method

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1  
instanceof is never a solution to an OO problem. It's a quick and dirty hack to avoid implementing things in OO. –  Boris the Spider Apr 1 '13 at 11:16
    
yaa you are right . . but any way methods will be overloaded here. use instance of just to make sure –  Nirbhay Mishra Apr 1 '13 at 11:18

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