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I have to write unit test on ASP.NET MVC Web API Controller with Rhino.Mock I have a handler named AHandler.cs with inherts from System.Net.Http.HttpClientHandler class. The singnature SendAsync method of AHandler.cs is like followings :

protected override Task<HttpResponseMessage> SendAsync(HttpRequestMessage request, CancellationToken cancellationToken)
{
.....
 var response = base.SendAsync(request, cancellationToken).Result; 
 if (response.IsSuccessStatusCode)
 {
   .....
 }
}

the base keyword above means HttpClientHandler and its SendAsync() method is "protected"!!! Now I try to mock the object "base.SendAsync(request, cancellationToken).Result" and got the hand-made response result I wanted. But it seems that Rhino mocks can't see the "base" keyword when I wrote the followings code :

var mockbase = MockRepository.GenerateMock<AHandler>;
mockbase.Stub(x => x.base <=== can't see base keyword
                 ^^^^^

So I change another way and try to mock the HttpClientHandler class

var mockbase = MockRepository.GenerateMockHttpClientHandler>;
mockbase.Stub(x => x.  <== I can't see SendAsync() method, becase it is protected !!

Now I really suffer in it !! Can anybody give me some advice that how to made a custom response in MVC handler ?! very thanks !!

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1 Answer 1

Why do you want to mock a handler in first place ? You can inject an specific dummy implementation for your tests. That handler will return a new HttpResponse message expected by your tests.

public class MyDummyHttpHandler : DelegatingHandler
{
  HttpResponseMessage response;

  public MyDummyHttpHandler(HttpResponseMessage response)
  {
    this.response = response;
  }

  protected override Task<HttpResponseMessage> SendAsync(HttpRequestMessage request,    CancellationToken cancellationToken)
  {
    .....
    TaskCompletionSource<HttpResponseMessage> tsc = new TaskCompletionSource<HttpResponseMessage>();
    tsc.SetResult(this.response);

    return tsc.Task;
  }
}
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