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I have table and sql (running on Oracle):

T (it's just an example, the table is huge)

a  b  c
-------
1  4  7
2  5  5
3  6  8

sql:

SELECT a, b, c
FROM t

union all

SELECT 'R',b,c
FROM t
WHERE b = c AND (condition to another tables, etc)

It returns:

1  4  7
2  5  5
3  6  8
R  5  5

Is it possible to avoid UNION here (and don't add JOIN)? In other words - is it possible to optimize the query to avoid Oracle look into table T twice?

share|improve this question
    
what means "avoid UNION" ? What is the desired output? –  Florin Ghita Apr 1 '13 at 11:35
    
Aim is to reduce DB load. Actually, the table is huge and I want to avoid scan it twice. Join isn't an option here. –  Artsiom Apr 1 '13 at 11:40
    
Desired output - the same (in question after words 'It returns') –  Artsiom Apr 1 '13 at 11:42
    
What does condition to another tables, etc mean? –  Tim Apr 1 '13 at 11:54
1  
If your query is (pseudo-code) "Select name, condition from Fruit UNION select name, condition from fruit where condition = 'unripe'" your resultset is the entire set plus a subset. There is no way to get both parts of the resultset without scanning the entire set a second time to retrieve the subset from it. The full table will either be on disk or in a table-expression within your query, but either way, those tuples will have to be scanned again to apply the limiting condition (and then set your 'R' flag) for the subset. –  Tim Apr 1 '13 at 11:58
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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This will read your table once. The join is done with an auxiliary table which contains only two values(of course this in in memory - no I/O)

with t as(
  select '1' a,  '4' b,  '7' c from dual union all
  select '2',  '5',  '5' from dual union all
  select '3',  '6',  '8' from dual
)
select decode(aux.col,1,t.a,'R'), t.b, t.c 
from t
join (select '1' col from dual union all select '2' from dual) aux
on (aux.col='1' or t.b=t.c);

The query does not depend on '1' and '2'. It can be:

select decode(aux.col, 'bla', t.a,'R'), t.b, t.c 
from t
join (select 'bla' col from dual union all select 'otherbla' from dual) aux
on (aux.col='bla' or t.b=t.c);

UPDATE: Also, if number of b=c records is small, you can speed up your actual query creating an index:

 create index fbi on t (b-c);

and then replace in your query WHERE b = c with WHERE b - c = 0

UPDATE2 Just to get the ideea on how these queries are executed:

create table t(a varchar2(10), b varchar2(10), c varchar2(10));

insert into t 
select mod(dbms_random.random(),1000),
  mod(dbms_random.random(),1000),
  mod(dbms_random.random(),1000)
from dual
connect by level < 1000000;

exec DBMS_STATS.GATHER_TABLE_STATS('DEV','T');

--1
SELECT a, b, c
FROM t;
---------------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation         | Name | Rows  | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)|
---------------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT  |      |   999K|    11M|   700   (3)|
|   1 |  TABLE ACCESS FULL| T    |   999K|    11M|   700   (3)|
---------------------------------------------------------------

--2
SELECT a, b, c
FROM t
union all
SELECT 'R',b,c
FROM t
WHERE b = c;
----------------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation          | Name | Rows  | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)|
----------------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT   |      |  1009K|    11M|  1426  (53)|
|   1 |  UNION-ALL         |      |       |       |            |
|   2 |   TABLE ACCESS FULL| T    |   999K|    11M|   700   (3)|
|   3 |   TABLE ACCESS FULL| T    | 10000 |    97K|   726   (7)|
---------------------------------------------------------------- 


--3
select decode(aux.col, 'bla', t.a,'R'), t.b, t.c 
from t
join (select 'bla' col from dual union all select 'otherbla' from dual) aux
on (aux.col='bla' or t.b=t.c);


----------------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation          | Name | Rows  | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)|
----------------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT   |      | 20990 |   368K|  1402   (3)|
|   1 |  NESTED LOOPS      |      | 20990 |   368K|  1402   (3)|
|   2 |   VIEW             |      |     2 |    12 |     4   (0)|
|   3 |    UNION-ALL       |      |       |       |            |
|   4 |     FAST DUAL      |      |     1 |       |     2   (0)|
|   5 |     FAST DUAL      |      |     1 |       |     2   (0)|
|   6 |   TABLE ACCESS FULL| T    | 10495 |   122K|   699   (3)|
----------------------------------------------------------------
--if the leading table is dual, can be used an /*+ordered*/ hint 
--after select clause


--4
create index fbi on t (b-c);
SELECT a, b, c
FROM t
union all
SELECT 'R',b,c
FROM t
WHERE b - c = 0;
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation                    | Name | Rows  | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)|
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT             |      |  1009K|    11M|  1384  (51)|
|   1 |  UNION-ALL                   |      |       |       |            |
|   2 |   TABLE ACCESS FULL          | T    |   999K|    11M|   700   (3)|
|   3 |   TABLE ACCESS BY INDEX ROWID| T    | 10000 |   117K|   683   (1)|
|   4 |    INDEX RANGE SCAN          | FBI  |  4000 |       |     3   (0)|
--------------------------------------------------------------------------

Keep in mind that Oracle does not know to predict well on or join clauses like in 3, so better you force a desired execution path. You should test to choose between 2 and 3 and 4(with the back of the cost of the index).

share|improve this answer
    
1,2,3..etc are real data numbers. I don't know these numbers before executing an sql. –  Artsiom Apr 1 '13 at 11:46
    
You don't need to hardcode anything. The aux table is a soup. You can write it as is. –  Florin Ghita Apr 1 '13 at 11:49
    
This works perfectly for me. I'll look at the ex plan an tune somehow, but I believe it's the option. –  Artsiom Apr 1 '13 at 12:14
    
How do you know this is in memory -- no I/O? The OP said the table was 'huge'. You're scanning the full set twice in any case, once to get the full set, and then to get the subset based on a condition, assigning the 'R' flag to rows in the subset where b=c. So it is not possible to avoid Oracle look into table T twice. Those tuples ARE being evaluated a second time. Also, he wasn't selecting constants but column-values: OP said I don't know these numbers before executing an sql. –  Tim Apr 1 '13 at 13:46
    
@Tim Oh, no, the dual union dual is in memory, not the table t :) –  Florin Ghita Apr 2 '13 at 6:39
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