Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm relatively new in TCL, in TCL prompt, when we invoke a proc with some return value, the proc's return value is echoed back by tcl. Is there a way to stop it (without affecting puts or similar functionality) as an example

bash$ tclsh
% proc a {} { puts  "hello"; return 34; }
% a
hello
34
%

Now how do i suppress the 34 coming to the screen? Any help is appreciated.

Update: Actually the proc is a part of another tool, earlier it did not have any return value, but now conditionally it can return a value. it can be called from a script and there won't be any problem (as Bryan pointed out). and it can be called from interactive prompt, then after all the necessary outputs, the return value is getting printed unnecessarily. So 1) I don't have the facility of changing a user's tclshrc 2) existing scripts should continue to work. And it seems strange that every time the proc is called, after all the necessary outputs, a number gets printed. To a user, this is a needless information unless he has caught the value and wants to do something. So i wanted the value to be delivered to user, but without getting printed to prompt/UI (hope i'm clear )

share|improve this question
    
I dont think there is a way to do that. Why do you want to disable it? –  bzjywhjm Apr 1 '13 at 12:38
1  
Why is this important? Are you aware this is a feature of the interactive shell and not something you would notice when running a file-based script? –  Bryan Oakley Apr 1 '13 at 13:45
    
That's how tclsh works. Change the C source code, build a tclsh without this behaviour and offer it to your users as an alternative tclsh. –  potrzebie Apr 1 '13 at 16:33
    
A chameleon question. You just disqualified most of the answers. –  Johannes Kuhn Apr 1 '13 at 17:42
1  
the result of the set command is the new value. set a [set b [set c 34]] sets a, b and c to 34. With some tricks (trace) it can return a different value than the result from a –  Johannes Kuhn Apr 2 '13 at 6:54

3 Answers 3

The interactive shell code in tclsh and wish will print any non-empty result. To get nothing printed, you have to have the last command on the “line” produce an empty result. But which command to use?

Many commands will produce an empty result:

if 1 {}
subst ""
format ""

However, the shortest is probably:

list

Thus, you could write your code like:

a;list

Of course, this only really becomes useful when your command actually produces a large result that you don't want to see. In those cases, I often find that it is most useful to use something that measures the size of the result, such as:

set tmp [something_which_produces a_gigantic result]; string length $tmp

The most useful commands I find for that are string length, llength and dict size.


If you absolutely must not print the result of the command, you have to write your own interactive loop. There are two ways to do this, depending on whether you are running inside the event loop or not:

Without the event loop

This simplistic version just checks to see if the command name is in what the user typed. It's probably not a good idea to arbitrarily throw away results otherwise!

set accum ""
while {[gets stdin line] >= 0} {
    append accum $line "\n"
    if {[info complete $accum]} {
        if {[catch $accum msg]} {
            puts stderr $msg
        } elseif {$msg ne "" && ![string match *TheSpecialCommand* $accum]} {
            puts $msg
        }
        set accum ""
    }
}

With the event loop

This is just handling the blocking IO case; that's the correct thing when input is from a cooked terminal (i.e., the default)

fileevent stdin readable handleInput
set accum ""
proc handleInput {} {
    global accum
    if {[gets stdin line] < 0} {
        exit; # Or whatever
    }
    append accum $line "\n"
    if {[info complete $accum]} {
        if {[catch {uplevel "#0" $accum} msg]} {
            puts stderr $msg
        } elseif {$msg ne "" && ![string match *TheSpecialCommand* $accum]} {
            puts $msg
        }
        set accum ""
    }
}
vwait forever; # Assuming you're not in wish or have some other event loop...

How to detect the command is being executed

The code above uses ![string match *TheSpecialCommand* $accum] to decide whether to throw away the command results, but this is very ugly. A more elegant approach that leverages Tcl's own built-in hooks is to use an execution trace to detect whether the command has been called (I'll just show the non-event-loop version here, for brevity). The other advantage of this is that it is simple to extend to suppressing the output from multiple commands: just add the trace to each of them.

trace add execution TheSpecialCommand enter SuppressOutput
proc SuppressOutput args {
    # Important; do not suppress when it is called inside another command
    if {[info level] == 1} {
        set ::SuppressTheOutput 1
    }
}

# Mostly very similar from here on
set accum ""
while {[gets stdin line] >= 0} {
    append accum $line "\n"
    if {[info complete $accum]} {
        set SuppressTheOutput 0;                       # <<<<<< Note this!
        if {[catch $accum msg]} {
            puts stderr $msg
        } elseif {$msg ne "" && !$SuppressTheOutput} { # <<<<<< Note this!
            puts $msg
        }
        set accum ""
    }
}

To be clear, I wouldn't ever do this in my own code! I'd just suppress the output manually if it mattered.

share|improve this answer
1  
You can also write your own read-eval-print-loop (without the print part) if you want. That's more work than is usually justified. –  Donal Fellows Apr 1 '13 at 13:46
    
as per my update, i have to deliver the return value silently. So even i write a wrapper around the original proc, it defeats the purpose. –  abasu Apr 1 '13 at 15:01
1  
@abasu It's not nice to change the requirements so substantially on people (ask another question instead!) but I hope my extended answer addresses how to do it. Note that you have to use your own interaction loop to do this sort of trick. (Execution traces can't change the output of a command other than by throwing an error, which you probably don't want to do!) –  Donal Fellows Apr 2 '13 at 8:49
    
I understand initial problem description was inadequate. Actually i thought this would be simple setting some verbosity level. After the first barrage of posts, i understood the mistake and updated the description. Anyway, thanks for your post. It seems to be the best/only approach for me (unless i change the c code and build another tclsh :) ) –  abasu Apr 3 '13 at 13:22

You could make an empty procedure in .tclshrc...

proc void {} {}

...and when you don't need a return value, end the line with ;void.

share|improve this answer

Use tcl_interactive variable to enable the return of of the value, although I'm not sure where this would be useful...

proc a {} {
    puts "hello"
    if { [info exist tcl_interactive] } {
        return {};
    } else {
        return 34;
    }
} 
share|improve this answer
    
you should not only check if the variable exist. tcl_interactive is in his case always 1. Consider using info level too. –  Johannes Kuhn Apr 2 '13 at 15:35
    
well as per my update, i need the return value to be delivered silently. So even if it is interactive mode, i need a return value, what i don't want is to tcl prompt echoing back that value –  abasu Apr 3 '13 at 16:42
    
@abasu: Ok, I thought you only needed the return value if you used it non-interactively. So using the tcl prompt is part of your standard work procedure... –  Roalt Apr 4 '13 at 7:32
    
@Kuhn: I've checked this with running it in either a shell (with #!/usr/bin/tclsh on top) and running it as part of a source-command. For that purpose, it works. –  Roalt Apr 4 '13 at 7:34

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.