Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I couldnt understand the why we are using *&first (pointer and address operator together). What does it mean? And when should i use it?

void splitArray (int *A, int size, int ind1, int ind2, int *&first, int &firstSize,int *&second, int &secondSize)
{
    firstSize = ind2 - ind1 + 1;
    secondSize = size - firstSize;

    first = new int[firstSize];
    second = new int[secondSize];

    int cnt1 = 0, cnt2 = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < size; i++)
    {
        if ((i >= ind1) && (i <= ind2)){
        first[cnt1] = A[i]; 
        cnt1++;
    }
    else 
        {
    second[cnt2] = A[i]; 
    cnt2++;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

What does it mean? And when should i use it?

The & symbol appearing after a type defines a reference to that type. Thus, for instance, int& is a reference to an int, my_object& is a reference to my_object, and int *& is a reference to an int* (i.e. a reference to a pointer to an int).

When it appears in a function signature, that means the corresponding argument will be passed by reference rather than by value: when passing by value, the function receives a copy of the argument; when passing by reference, on the other hand, the function operates directly on the argument being passed.

Therefore, passing a pointer by reference means that changes done by the function to the value of that pointer will affect the original argument being passed.

In particular, these two instructions:

first = new int[firstSize];
second = new int[secondSize];

Will assign a dynamically allocated array to first and second. Therefore, in the following code snippet (ellipses represent other arguments):

int* myfirst = NULL;
int* mysecond = NULL;
splitArray(..., myfirst, ..., mysecond, ...);

When returning from splitArray(), myfirst and mysecond will point to the arrays allocated inside the functions and assigned to first and second, respectively.

If you weren't passing those pointers by reference, then the value of myfirst and mysecond would still be NULL after splitArray() returns (because splitArray() would be working on a copy of those pointers).

share|improve this answer

It is a pointer that is being passed by reference. This means that when first is changed:

first = new int[firstSize];

the change propagates back to the caller.

Fundamentally, this is no different to how firstSize is being passed around, except that first happens to be a pointer.

share|improve this answer

& considers everything in front of it as type to reference. Sometimes you need to pass pointer itself not the copy of it. For example, you may need to allocate memory in a function that will be used out of it. So you pass pointer as reference to be able to handle it but not the address it points.

share|improve this answer

Sometimes, programmers use references to be sure that the pointer object exist at the moment to initialize the object, before the rest of the implementation of the object included constructor instructions.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.