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I am using numpy.matrix. If I add a 3x3 matrix with a 1x3, or 3x1, vector. I get a 3x3 matrix back. Should this not be 'undefined'? And if not, what is the explanation to this?

Example

a = np.matrix('1 1 1; 1 1 1; 1 1 1')
b = np.matrix('1 1 1')
a + b #or a + np.transpose(b)

Output:

matrix([[2, 2, 2],
        [2, 2, 2],
        [2, 2, 2]])
share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

This is called "broadcasting". From the manual:

The term broadcasting describes how numpy treats arrays with different shapes during arithmetic operations. Subject to certain constraints, the smaller array is “broadcast” across the larger array so that they have compatible shapes. Broadcasting provides a means of vectorizing array operations so that looping occurs in C instead of Python. It does this without making needless copies of data and usually leads to efficient algorithm implementations. There are, however, cases where broadcasting is a bad idea because it leads to inefficient use of memory that slows computation.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks that explains it. Had not understood that concept yet, eventhough the error message already pointed me to it: "ValueError: operands could not be broadcast together with shapes ..." – andershqst Apr 1 '13 at 13:56

If you do wish to add a vector to a matrix, you can do so by selecting where it should go:

In [155]: ma = np.matrix(
     ...:     [[ 1.,  1.,  1.],
     ...:      [ 1.,  1.,  1.],
     ...:      [ 1.,  1.,  1.]])

In [156]: mb = np.matrix([[1,2,3]])

In [157]: ma[1] += mb # second row

In [158]: ma
Out[158]: 
matrix([[ 1.,  1.,  1.],
        [ 2.,  3.,  4.],
        [ 1.,  1.,  1.]])

In [159]: ma[:,1] += mb.T # second column

In [160]: ma
Out[160]: 
matrix([[ 1.,  2.,  1.],
        [ 2.,  5.,  4.],
        [ 1.,  4.,  1.]])

But I'd like to warn that you are not using numpy.matrix as stated. In fact, you are using numpy.ndarray because np.ones returns an ndarray and not a matrix.

The adding is still the same, but create some matrices, and you'll find that they behave differently:

In [161]: ma*mb
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
ValueError                                Traceback (most recent call last)

ValueError: matrices are not aligned

In [162]: mb*ma
Out[162]: matrix([[ 6.,  6.,  6.]])

In [163]: ma*mb.T
Out[163]: 
matrix([[ 6.],
        [ 6.],
        [ 6.]])

In [164]: aa = np.ones((3,3))

In [165]: ab = np.arange(1,4)

In [166]: aa*ab
Out[166]: 
array([[ 1.,  2.,  3.],
       [ 1.,  2.,  3.],
       [ 1.,  2.,  3.]])

In [167]: ab*aa
Out[167]: 
array([[ 1.,  2.,  3.],
       [ 1.,  2.,  3.],
       [ 1.,  2.,  3.]])
share|improve this answer
    
Arh yes you are right about the matrices. I will correct my question. However, my question is for addition, where broadcast seems to work as pointed to in the accepted answer. – andershqst Apr 1 '13 at 14:03
    
Yes, please do; I just wanted to warn you about possibly unexpected behavior. – askewchan Apr 1 '13 at 14:04
    
Yes, thank you. – andershqst Apr 1 '13 at 14:09

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