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I have some code that loops through a list of records, starts an export task for each one, and increases a progress counter by 1 each time a task finishes so the user knows how far along the process is.

But depending on the timing of my loops, I often see the output showing a higher number before a lower number.

For example, I would expect to see output like this:

Exporting A
Exporting B
Exporting C
Exporting D
Exporting E
Finished 1 / 5
Finished 2 / 5
Finished 3 / 5
Finished 4 / 5
Finished 5 / 5

But instead I get output like this

Exporting A
Exporting B
Exporting C
Exporting D
Exporting E
Finished 1 / 5
Finished 2 / 5
Finished 5 / 5
Finished 4 / 5
Finished 3 / 5

I don't expect the output to be exact since I'm not locking the value when I update/use it (sometimes it outputs the same number twice, or skips a number), however I wouldn't expect it to go backwards.

My test data set is 72 values, and the relevant code looks like this:

var tasks = new List<Task>();
int counter = 0;

StatusMessage = string.Format("Exporting 0 / {0}", count);

foreach (var value in myValues)
{
    var valueParam = value;

    // Create async task, start it, and store the task in a list
    // so we can wait for all tasks to finish at the end
    tasks.Add(
        Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
        {
            Debug.WriteLine("Exporting " + valueParam );

            System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(500);
            counter++;
            StatusMessage = string.Format("Exporting {0} / {1}", counter, count);

            Debug.WriteLine("Finished " + counter.ToString());
        })
    );
}

// Begin async task to wait for all tasks to finish and update output
Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
{
    Task.WaitAll(tasks.ToArray());
    StatusMessage = "Finished";
});

The output can appear backwards in both the debug statements and the StatusMessage output.

What's the correct way to keep count of how many async tasks in a loop are completed so that this problem doesn't occur?

share|improve this question
1  
Are you sure that the Async Prcess is guaranteed to output in the an Ascending Order Based on what I am seeing I don't think it will unless you perhaps do a Sort on the List<Task> –  DJ KRAZE Apr 1 '13 at 14:48
    
Since you're starting all tasks at essentially the same time, they will finish in a random order. Even if you use Interlocked.Increment "Finished n/5" won't be monotonic. –  Phil Apr 1 '13 at 15:04
    
@DJKRAZE The counter variable should not actually get increased until the export completes (Replaced by Thread.Sleep for test purposes). Different exports take different amounts of time to complete depending how much data they contain, so I don't want the value predefined at the start of the async task. Instead, I'm attempting to use a shared variable that is increased by 1 anytime any export task completes. –  Rachel Apr 1 '13 at 15:14
    
Your code doesn't match with the sample outputs. I think it would help if you explained where are you getting that output from (the console? or is StatusMessage a bound property?) and made that clear in your code (I don't see any reason to use both StatucMessage and Debug.WriteLine() in your example). –  svick Apr 1 '13 at 15:15
    
@svick I only need the StatusMessage update (which yes, is a property bound to the UI), but added the Debug statements in there for testing when I started getting unexpected results. I added the " / 5" to the end of my sample output because I thought it would be a bit easier to understand, but never bothered to update my Debug lines the same way. –  Rachel Apr 1 '13 at 15:18

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You get mixed output, because counter is not incremented in the same order as Debug.WriteLine(...) method is executed.

To get a consistent progress report, you can introduce a reporting lock into the task

tasks.Add(
    Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
    {
        Debug.WriteLine("Exporting " + valueParam );

        System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(500);
        lock(progressReportLock)
        {
           counter++;
           StatusMessage = string.Format("Exporting {0} / {1}", counter, count);
           Debug.WriteLine("Finished " + counter.ToString());
        }
    })
);
share|improve this answer
    
@svick Yikes, you're totally right. –  IdeaHat Apr 1 '13 at 15:21
    
I suspected this might have been the case, thank you. I ran a few tests using a lock and it seems to be outputting correctly now –  Rachel Apr 1 '13 at 15:29

In this sample the counter variable represents shared state among several threads. Using the ++ operator on shared state is simply unsafe and will give you incorrect results. It essentially boils down to the following instructions

  1. push counter to stack
  2. push 1 to stack
  3. add values on the stack
  4. store into counter

Because multiple threads are executing this statement it's possible for one to interrupt the other partway through completing the above sequence. This would cause the incorrect value to end up in counter.

Instead of ++ use the following statement

Interlocked.Increment(ref counter);

This operation is specifically designed to update state which may be shared among several threads. The interlocked will happen atomically and won't suffer from the race conditions I outlined

The actual out of order display of values suffers from a similar problem even after my suggested fix. The increment and display operation aren't atomic and hence one thread can interrupt the other in between the increment and display. If you want the operations to be un-interruptable by other threads then you will need to use a lock.

object lockTarget = new object();
int counter = 0; 

...

lock (lockTarget) {
  counter++;
  StatusMessage = string.Format("Exporting {0} / {1}", counter, count);
  Debug.WriteLine("Finished " + counter.ToString());
}

Note that because the increment of counter now occurs inside the lock there is no longer a need to use Interlocked.Increment

share|improve this answer
2  
Look like using Interlocked.Increment would not help with out-of-order status reports that she got. –  alex Apr 1 '13 at 15:16
    
@alex is correct, using Interlocked.Increment still results in output in the wrong order –  Rachel Apr 1 '13 at 15:21
    
@alex updated to correct that part –  JaredPar Apr 1 '13 at 15:22
    
@Rachel updated to correct that part –  JaredPar Apr 1 '13 at 15:56

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