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I have a simple dependency property. I have a user control with a button. I want the caller to set a property called MyName to "Hello". I want the dependency property code to append the string " World" to the end. Here's my code that attempts this:

#region MyNAME DEPENDENCY PROPERTY
private string _myName;
public string MyName
{
    get { return this._myName; } //a breakpoint here never trips
    set
    {
        this._myName = value;
        this.OnPropertyChanged("MyName");
    }
}

public string MyName2 { get { return this._myName; } } //a breakpoint here will trip

public static readonly DependencyProperty MyNameProperty = DependencyProperty.Register("MyName", typeof(string), typeof(MyTabControl), new PropertyMetadata("", OnMyNamePropertyChanged));

private static void OnMyNamePropertyChanged(DependencyObject dependencyObject, DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs e)
{
    MyTabControl myUserControl = dependencyObject as MyTabControl;
    myUserControl.OnMyNamePropertyChanged(e);
    myUserControl.OnPropertyChanged("MyName");
}
private void OnMyNamePropertyChanged(DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs e)
{
    this.MyName = (string)e.NewValue + " World";
}
#endregion //end MyNAME

And my button XAML code looks like:

<Button Content="{Binding Path=MyName, Mode=OneWay}" />

When I load a page that has this control like this:

<local:MyTabControl MyName="Hello" />

I get a button that says "Hello" rather than a button that says "Hello World". The strange part is if I change my button XAML code to use MyName2 like so:

<Button Content="{Binding Path=MyName2, Mode=OneWay}" />

it works. The getter code is the same (I included it above). I'm guessing that the code that gets _myName is getting called earlier than I expect. What I also don't expect is that the MyName getter never seems to get called. When I put a breakpoint there, it doesn't trip. When I change the button binding path to use MyName2 however, a breakpoint put on that getter will trip.

What am I doing wrong here? How can I use the MyName property and have my button show "Hello World" (without using a second getter of course)

EDIT: Adding new code.

I took both of your suggestions and changed my C# code to simply this:

public string MyName
{
    get { return (string)GetValue(MyNameCustomProperty); }
    set { SetValue(MyNameCustomProperty, value + " World"); }
}
public static DependencyProperty MyNameCustomProperty = DependencyProperty.Register("MyName", typeof(string), typeof(MyTabControl));

(I'm still new to depency properties) I am still having the same problem as I had with my previous code. Can I do something with this code?

share|improve this question
    
I assume, you have a custom OnPropertyChanged function? The default one doesnt take string it takes PropertyChangedEventArgs –  jacob aloysious Apr 1 '13 at 15:09
    
My class MyTabControl implements INotifyPropertyChanged. I have a simple OnPropertyChanged event handler that calls this.PropertyChanged(...). I takes a string. I see that I left that out of the code I pasted in. –  user2023861 Apr 1 '13 at 15:16

3 Answers 3

Part of the problem here is that you're not using a real dependency property. In order to use a dependency property you need to use the actual dependency property storage and not a field. This backing storage is where items like binding go to for their values. Change your code to the following and delete the backing field

public string MyName
{
    get { return (string)this.GetValue(MyNameProperty); }
    set { this.SetValue(MyNameProperty, value); }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I tried to use this code instead, and I am still having the same problem. You can see my code at the bottom of my original post. I append " World" to value in the setter, but the button still shows only "Hello". Did I paste in the code wrong? –  user2023861 Apr 1 '13 at 15:07
up vote 0 down vote accepted

It looks like I need to coerce the value. Here is how I do that:

public string MyName
{
    get { return (string)GetValue(MyNameCustomProperty); }
    set { SetValue(MyNameCustomProperty, value); }
}
public static DependencyProperty MyNameCustomProperty = DependencyProperty.Register("MyName", typeof(string), typeof(MyTabControl), new PropertyMetadata("", MyPropertyChanged, CoerceCurrentReading));

private static void MyPropertyChanged(DependencyObject d, DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs e)
{
    //contains coerced value
}

private static object CoerceCurrentReading(DependencyObject d, object value)
{
    MyTabControl tab = (MyTabControl)d;
    return (string)value + " World";
}

This looks like the cleanest way to change the value entered by the XAML code from "Hello" to "Hello World".

share|improve this answer

You want to change what value is set before the notification occurs. The simplest solution is to set the value of the backing field to what you want, then notify:

public string MyName
{
    get { return this._myName; } //a breakpoint here never trips
    set
    {
        this._myName = (string)value + "World!";
        this.OnPropertyChanged("MyName");
    }
}

The problem you are having is that you set the backing field. Then you notify, which tells the UI to update, as well as triggering OnNotifyPropertyChanged. OnNotifyPropertyChanged is called after the property has changed, where you try to change the backing field.

share|improve this answer
    
That is not working for me. That is similar to my first attempt. Look at the line this.MyName = (string)e.NewValue + " World"; in the method OnMyNamePropertyChanged. It appends the " World" string. This does what you suggest, except it happens one step earlier in the call stack. –  user2023861 Apr 1 '13 at 17:17

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