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I am writing Client/Server using java sockets. There is my code:

SERVER:

public void sendFile(File file) {
    BufferedOutputStreambufferedOutputStream = new BufferedOutputStream(socket.getOutputStream());
    int count;
    FileInputStream in;
    try {
        in = new FileInputStream(file);
        byte[] mybytearray = new byte[(int) file.length()];
        while ((count = in.read(mybytearray)) > 0) {
            bufferedOutputStream.write(mybytearray, 0, count);
        }
    } catch (IOException e) {
        // TODO Auto-generated catch block
        e.printStackTrace();
    }

}

CLIENT:

public void downloadFile() {
    BufferedInputStream bufferedInputStream = new BufferedInputStream(socket.getInputStream());
    byte[] aByte = new byte[8192];
    int count;
    FileOutputStream in;
    try {
        in = new FileOutputStream("C://fis.txt");
        while ((count = bufferedInputStream.read(aByte)) > 0) {
        System.out.println(count); // <- nothing happens
            in.write(aByte, 0, count);
        }
    } catch (IOException e) {
        // TODO Auto-generated catch block
        e.printStackTrace();
    }

}

Why bufferedInputStream in 2nd function is empty ?

share|improve this question
    
What does this program print out? Also, can you add surrounding test code to make the example complete? – phihag Apr 1 '13 at 14:57
up vote 3 down vote accepted

BufferedOutputStream will not write data until the buffer is full. You need to flush the OutputStream:

bufferedOutputStream.flush();
share|improve this answer
    
Thx. I didn't think about it. – jpos Apr 1 '13 at 15:01
    
flush pushes the bytes to OS buffers – Hamza Zafar Apr 1 '15 at 14:37

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