Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a little question about how ruby interprets de ensure clause in the code. As i know, ensure clause must always be enclosed by begin and end tokens.

For example, if i write this piece of code a kENSURE error will be raised (C:/Documents and Settings/jlomonaco/Desktop/borrar.rb:3: syntax error, unexpecte d kENSURE, expecting $end)

x=5
raise "ERROR!!!" if x==5
ensure
puts "some code has been executed"

However if I wrap this code between begin and end clauses no error will be raised:

begin
x=5
raise "ERROR!!!" if x==5
ensure
puts "some code has been executed"
end

So here comes my question:

I have discovered that inside a function definition isn't obligatory to wrap the ensure token between begin and end; for example i could just write this code and no errors will be raised:

def stackoverflow
 x=5
 raise "ERROR!!!" if x==5
ensure
 puts "some code has been executed"
end

stackoverflow

And if i write the begin and end tokens the code works well too. So where is it obligatory to put the BEGIN and END clauses?

Thanks!

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This behavior is documented in The Ruby Programming Language:

Throughout this discussion of exception handling, we have described the rescue, else, and ensure keywords as clauses of a begin statement. In fact, they can also be used as clauses of the def statement (defines a method), the class statement (defines a class), and the module statement (defines a module). Method definitions are covered in Chapter 6; class and module definitions are covered in Chapter 7.

I've found this to be a great reference book.

share|improve this answer

Based on a little experimentation, ensure seems to be valid in begin, def, class, and module blocks (i.e. definitions + begin), but not at the top level and not in loops, conditionals, or do blocks / { |args| ... }.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes i think my question is very subtle and the answer is on experimentation as u said! Thanks for that information! –  flyer88 Oct 15 '09 at 20:53
    
Good answers need facts and not speculation. –  johannes Oct 16 '09 at 9:23
1  
The results of experiments are facts. But I see your point; it's usually better to reference documentation (like Mark Westling does) than poke around with the interpreter, so I'll vote up Mark's answer. –  wdebeaum Oct 16 '09 at 12:52
    
Of course, i prefer a book reference rather than an answer based on expermintation; but as this question was too specific i doubt that it has a 'book' answer. Anyway your expermientations and conclusions were correct wdebeam, thanks a lot again :) –  flyer88 Oct 16 '09 at 13:37

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.