Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a set of stored procedures that I am using to populate an ASP.Net CheckBoxList. When running this procedure from code as { CALL ProcedureName(params); } with the type set as stored procedure, I only seem to be getting a partial result back (i.e. many columns from the actual result are missing.)

If I copy the CommandText from the query (having used a breakpoint to get the exact text sent) and run it directly in Navicat (or any other MySQL GUI), I get all of the expected columns.

Here is the code that is not working:

using (OdbcCommand command = OdbcConnection.CreateCommand())
{
    command.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;
    command.CommandText = "{ " + string.Format(StoredProcedureCall, foundationId, fpids, "", "", "NULL", "2001/01/02", "2001/01/01", "*") +
                          " }";
    using (OdbcDataReader reader = command.ExecuteReader())
    {

        for (int i = 0; i < reader.FieldCount; i++)
        {
            columns.Add(reader.GetName(i));
        }
    }
}

If I change the code to the following however it starts to work (only adding the other using):

using (OdbcConnection)
using (OdbcCommand command = OdbcConnection.CreateCommand())
{
    command.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;
    command.CommandText = "{ " + string.Format(StoredProcedureCall, foundationId, fpids, "", "", "NULL", "2001/01/02", "2001/01/01", "*") +
                          " }";
    using (OdbcDataReader reader = command.ExecuteReader())
    {

        for (int i = 0; i < reader.FieldCount; i++)
        {
            columns.Add(reader.GetName(i));
        }
    }
}

What is going on here?

For reference here is the OdbcConnection property:

public static OdbcConnection OdbcConnection
{
    get
    {
        // If we have no connection or our connection isn't open
        if (null == odbcConnection || ConnectionState.Open != odbcConnection.State)
        {
            odbcConnection = new OdbcConnection(BaseAccess.DBConnectionString);
            odbcConnection.Open();
        }

        return odbcConnection;
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
If your application using the same login credentials as Navicat? –  Sonny Boy Oct 15 '09 at 19:59
    
Yes, they are running with the same user/password –  mikeschuld Oct 15 '09 at 20:03
    
how did you find out that columns are missing? what are you using to store the data sent by the SP? –  manji Oct 15 '09 at 20:31
    
The result in the ODBC reader in the C# code is read into a list. This list is where many columns are missing (and what is used as the datasource for the CheckBoxList) –  mikeschuld Oct 15 '09 at 20:40
    
this can be a bug in ODBC/MySql. Do the missing columns have the same type? or something else in common? can you use ADO.NET Driver for MySQL instead of ODBC and see the results? –  manji Oct 15 '09 at 21:21
show 1 more comment

3 Answers

This could be a bug in the Odbc MySql driver. Try using the ADO.NET driver. Also I would advice you against handling the connections manually inside static properties. Leave this task to ADO.NET which will effectively handle a connection pool:

using (var conn = new MySqlConnection(DBConnectionString))
using (var cmd = conn.CreateCommand())
{
    conn.Open();
    cmd.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;
    cmd.CommandText = "sp_name";

    cmd.Parameters.Add(new SqlParameter("@foundationId", foundationId));
    cmd.Parameters.Add(new SqlParameter("@fpids", fpids));
    ...

    using (var reader = cmd.ExecuteReader())
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < reader.FieldCount; i++)
        {
            columns.Add(reader.GetName(i));
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
ADO.Net driver actually makes the problem worse. It doesn't return all the columns with OR without the extra using statement. –  mikeschuld Feb 22 '11 at 22:12
add comment

make sure your columns all have unique names.

share|improve this answer
    
Non uniquely named columns would throw a MySQL Exception. There is no such exception. Not to mention that the procedure forces unique column names as part of the code because they are all numbered (q1: blah, q2: blah, etc.) –  mikeschuld Oct 19 '09 at 17:00
add comment
up vote 0 down vote accepted

This was somehow related to connections being reused and some of the @ variables in stored procedures not being reset between runs. Changing to pooled connections that are closed/disposed of correctly is what fixed my issue.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.