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I am very new to socket programming and I have troubles with it. I want to implement a server that answers depending on a certain client request. In my case, either GET, HEAD or an error else. Consider following code

If I print the answer before calling send() (see server side code below), the message is correct. But let's say from the client I send

  1. GET
  2. HEAD
  3. GET
  4. test
  5. GET

, the answer printed from the client side is

You want GET
You want HEAD
You want GETD
HTTP/1.1 400 Bad Request
You want GET Bad Request

So it seems like that the message sent from the server is kind of 'overwritten', but how is this avoidable? Is it possible to 'clear the server buffer' if that is the problem at all?

Here is the full server side code

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/socket.h>
#include <netinet/in.h>
#include <arpa/inet.h>
#include <netdb.h>

#define BUFSIZE         1024
#define MAXPENDING      100

int main(){

    char get[] = "GET";
    char head[] = "HEAD";
    int serverSocket = socket(PF_INET, SOCK_STREAM, 0);

    struct sockaddr_in serverAddress;
    serverAddress.sin_family = AF_INET;
    serverAddress.sin_port = htons(8080);
    serverAddress.sin_addr.s_addr = htonl(INADDR_ANY);
    memset(&serverAddress.sin_zero, '\0', 8);

    bind(serverSocket, (struct sockaddr*)&serverAddress, sizeof(serverAddress));

    listen(serverSocket, MAXPENDING);

    for(;;){
        struct sockaddr_in clientAddress;
        int clientAddressLength = sizeof(clientAddress);
        int clientSocket;

        clientSocket = accept(serverSocket, (struct sockaddr*)&clientAddress, &clientAddressLength);

        char buf[BUFSIZE];
        int bytesRec;

        bytesRec = recv(clientSocket, buf, BUFSIZE, 0);
        while(bytesRec > 0){

            char *result;
            result = strtok(buf, " ");

            printf("result %s\n", result);

            if(strcmp(&buf, &get) == 0){
                char answer[] = "You want GET";
                send(clientSocket, answer, strlen(answer), 0);
            }else{
                if(strcmp(&buf, &head) == 0){
                    char answer[] = "You want HEAD";
                    send(clientSocket, answer, strlen(answer), 0);
                }else{
                    char answer[] = "HTTP/1.1 400 Bad Request";
                    send(clientSocket, answer, strlen(answer), 0); 
                }
            }

            bytesRec = recv(clientSocket, buf, BUFSIZE, 0);
        }

    return 0;
}

and the client side

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/socket.h>
#include <netinet/in.h>
#include <arpa/inet.h>
#include <netdb.h>

int main(){

    int clientSocket = socket(PF_INET, SOCK_STREAM, 0);

    struct sockaddr_in clientAddress;
    clientAddress.sin_family = AF_INET;
    clientAddress.sin_port = 0;
    clientAddress.sin_addr.s_addr = htonl(INADDR_ANY);
    memset(&clientAddress.sin_zero, '\0', 8/*sizeof(clientAddress.sin_zero)*/);

    bind(clientSocket, (struct sockaddr*)&clientAddress, sizeof(clientAddress));

    struct sockaddr_in serverAddress;
    serverAddress.sin_family = AF_INET;
    serverAddress.sin_port = htons(8080);
    serverAddress.sin_addr.s_addr = inet_addr("127.0.0.1");
    memset(&serverAddress.sin_zero, '\0', 8);

    if(connect(clientSocket, (struct sockaddr*)&serverAddress, sizeof(serverAddress)) == -1){
        printf("error in connecting!\n");
        return 0;
    }

    char* serverReply[1024];

    for(;;){
        char request[100];
        printf("Enter your request: ");
        scanf("%s", &request);
        send(clientSocket, request, strlen(msg), 0);
        if(recv(clientSocket, serverReply, strlen(serverReply), 0) < 0){
            printf("failure in receiving from server!\n");
        }else{
            printf("%s\n", serverReply);
        }
    }

    close(clientSocket);

    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
2  
Can you please remove the duplicate code from your question and post some client side code? – Vaibhav Desai Apr 1 '13 at 16:37
    
What does printf("result %s\n", result); prints on server side ? – Grijesh Chauhan Apr 1 '13 at 16:40
    
I'm sorry, I tested it again, and assuming I send "GET aa bb", it prints "result GET", "result aa", result "bb". This is obviously a further problem, but even sending only "GET" or "HEAD" results in above described behaviour – Valentino Ru Apr 1 '13 at 16:41
    
Are you sending a c-style string, ie terminated with a null? Are you actually sending the null char? Even if you are, you do not seem to be following any sort of protocol that checks that the null has actually been received - if you send 4 chars, 'bytesRec' may come back as 1,2,3 or 4. - you have to loop until the null appears somewhere in the buffer, then parse out your message until that null. – Martin James Apr 1 '13 at 16:44
up vote 3 down vote accepted
send(clientSocket, request, strlen(msg), 0);

This sends only the string characters and does not include the terminating NULL. The receive buffer does not terminate the received string on the server side.

This is why you are still seeing the 'D' character from the previous message.

You want GETD <-- 'D' is from the previous 'HEAD'

Either terminate the received string on the server,

buf[bytesRec] = '\0';

or send the NULL terminator from the client.

send(clientSocket, request, strlen(msg) + 1, 0);
share|improve this answer

Your strcmp() in if are wrong

(1) instead of buf you need to compare with result as I can understand from you question, do like: (you says in comment that result printed as GET)

if(strcmp(result, get) == 0){

(2) As @phihag answered it should be

if(strcmp(buf, get) == 0){
          ^   ^remove &

similar error you have on every strcmp(), because buf, get, head all are charter arrays.

(3) recv() doesn't terminates the read buffer so its better to add null (\0) before you work with it (as i can notice you are using buff as string)

do like:

bytesRec = recv(clientSocket, buf, BUFSIZE, 0);
buf[bytesRec] = '\0'

infect you should read only BUFSIZE-1 bytes left one for null '\0' symbol like:

ytesRec = recv(clientSocket, buf, BUFSIZE-1, 0);
buf[bytesRec] = '\0' 
share|improve this answer
    
Does the strcmp issue really matter? Doesn't the second one decay to pointer anyways? – jsn Apr 1 '13 at 17:24
    
@jsn do you means implicit typecase words can convert char(*)[] to char* in strcmp() then yes you are correct. – Grijesh Chauhan Apr 1 '13 at 17:29
1  
@jsn I would suggest that the strcmp issue matters. It may not be immediately obvious at first, but confusion of types needs to be cleared up before students begin using printf, scanf and friends. Passing the wrong type of pointer to scanf is undefined behaviour, because there is no implicit conversion from char (*)[BUFLEN] to char * in variadic argument lists. char (*)[BUFLEN] isn't required to have the same representation as a char *... – Seb Apr 3 '13 at 9:33

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