Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I executed the below C program which prints a the primes below the given N (N < 4294967295). It went fine when executed in SunOS, but I'm getting Segmentation fault (core dumped) when running in Ubuntu(compiled it with gcc compilter). Can anyone please let me know where I went wrong. Mentioned below the compiler versions of SunOS and Ubuntu 12.10

cc -V

cc: Sun C 5.9 SunOS_sparc Patch 124867-01 2007/07/12

gcc -v

Using built-in specs. COLLECT_GCC=gcc COLLECT_LTO_WRAPPER=/usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-linux-gnu/4.7/lto-wrapper Target: x86_64-linux-gnu Configured with: ../src/configure -v --with-pkgversion='Ubuntu/Linaro 4.7.2-2ubuntu1' --with-bugurl=file:///usr/share/doc/gcc-4.7/README.Bugs --enable-languages=c,c++,go,fortran,objc,obj-c++ --prefix=/usr --program-suffix=-4.7 --enable-shared --enable-linker-build-id --with-system-zlib --libexecdir=/usr/lib --without-included-gettext --enable-threads=posix --with-gxx-include-dir=/usr/include/c++/4.7 --libdir=/usr/lib --enable-nls --with-sysroot=/ --enable-clocale=gnu --enable-libstdcxx-debug --enable-libstdcxx-time=yes --enable-gnu-unique-object --enable-plugin --enable-objc-gc --disable-werror --with-arch-32=i686 --with-tune=generic --enable-checking=release --build=x86_64-linux-gnu --host=x86_64-linux-gnu --target=x86_64-linux-gnu Thread model: posix gcc version 4.7.2 (Ubuntu/Linaro 4.7.2-2ubuntu1)

#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>
#include<string.h>
#include<inttypes.h>

int main()
{
FILE *fpin,*fpout;
char ch[11], file_name[100];
long long int num1=0,i,tmp=0;
long long int *arr;

printf("enter file name:: ");
gets(file_name);

fpin = fopen(file_name,"r");
fpout = fopen("/home/code/output.c","w");

while(1)
{
 fgets(ch,11,fpin);
 if (!feof(fpin))
 {
   num1=atoll(ch);

   arr = prime_number(num1);

   for(i=0;*(arr+i)!='\0';i++)
      {
         fprintf(fpout,"%llu",*(arr+i));
         if(*(arr+i+1) == '\0')
             fputc('.',fpout);
         else
             fputc(',',fpout);
      }

 }
 else 
 {
   fclose(fpin);
   fclose(fpout);
   break;
 }
}

}

prime_number(long long int n)
{
  long long int i,j,total=0,a[200];
  int count=0;

  printf("\n%llu \n",n);

  for (j=2;j<=n;j++)
  {
     count = 0;
     for (i=1;i<=j;i++)
       {`enter code here`
         if ((j%i) == 0)
           count++;

         if (count > 2)
            break;
        }
     if (count==2)
        {
          a[total] = j; 
          total++; 
        }
  } 
return(&a[0]);
}
share|improve this question
    
In addition to returning the address of a local variable, a[200] is a bit small to store the primes in any nontrivial range. And your prime testing is woefully inefficient (though you break as soon as you found the third divisor, that's a good start). Divide only to the square root, the smallest prime divisor of a composite number cannot exceed the square root. –  Daniel Fischer Apr 1 '13 at 19:04
    
Hi @DanielFischer tried as you suggested and the execution time reduced by half. Thanks –  Hitendra Valluri Apr 5 '13 at 5:24
add comment

2 Answers

At the end of your prime_number funciton, you are returning a pointer to a variable which is defined in (the stack of) the prime_number function itself. Since when the function exists, the contents of its stack are effectivley vaporized, you are returning an invalid pointer.

Of course, depending on what system, OS, etc you are running, the contents of the stack may have not been immediatley overwritten and would APPEAR valid for a short period of time, but this is just luck.

Try either mallocing a return result (and freeing with your caller), or passing the array TO the prime_number function. This way, the contents will remain valid for the caller.

share|improve this answer
    
May be that is the reason when I ran on solaris machines I was getting some junk values in between. I will try mallocing. Thanks. –  Hitendra Valluri Apr 1 '13 at 20:45
add comment
return(&a[0]);

You're returning a pointer to a local variable, which doesn't exist after your function returns.

If you run gcc with warnings, your compiler should tell you this.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.