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Current application serves as a audiencing tool where in the documents and products that needs to be visible to the users in the portal is checked against certain rules in runtime based on the user who has signed in. For example the checks include if the user who has logged in belongs to a particular country for which the document is assigned to. If the document is assigned to country US and language English, then the login user's country and language is checked against these attributes of document. If it matches then the document will be shown to the user. Here comparison is between 2 objects - User object passed via session. The document related information(country, language) are retrieved from the database and stored as cache currently.

Question is 1. Will Drools be able to handle this complex logic? 2. Can the document attributes data(have amny document attributes) be stored in cache and used in Drools? 3. How to pass a user session object in Drools? 4. Will the performance be good to handle 100 million records approximately?

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1) Yes. Easily. In fact Drools is probably overkill, for such a comparatively simple set of (static) rules (which could be handled by a Query language). 2) I'm not quite sure what you mean here. 3) You can't (at least not in any meaningful way). Drools isn't magic. 4) Drools is not a database. It does not handle records. It handles rules. You give it a set or rules, and a set of parameters against which to test those rules, and Drools tells you whether the data complies to those rules or not.

Generally speaking you don't really need Drools for what you have in mind, any correctly designed RDBMS can handle these rules using relational data and queries. You should use that instead.

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